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Old 9th October 2008, 07:17 PM   #1
Michael Blalock
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Default Mameluke Sword

This sword just sold on Hermann Historica www.hermann-historica.com, Lot Nr.406. Sorry, no link to the page, nor can I copy the image.
That gavel price converts to $56,000 US plus a 20% buyer's fee I think. Quite a price in these troubled times for a plain piece, but a very interesting sword.
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Old 10th October 2008, 12:32 AM   #2
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I think linking like this should work: http://www.hermann-historica.de/auk...&db=kat56_p.txt
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Old 10th October 2008, 02:02 AM   #3
Jim McDougall
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Plain, yes......just plain magnificent!!!
It would seem that this broadsword might well represent the proto-kaskara.
Can anyone offer some insight on this piece....wish I had my trusty 'Yucel' with me
The pommel does seem to recall 'Viking' hilts.
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Old 10th October 2008, 02:08 AM   #4
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Well, here is the same type of fuller .
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Old 10th October 2008, 02:52 AM   #5
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Default MAMELUKE ???

I was of the impression that "mameluke" refered generally to the type of hilt on swords, similar in shape to the hilts on shamshirs.
Is this actually a "mameluke" sword?
Please educate me.
Regards Stuart
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Old 10th October 2008, 05:16 AM   #6
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Thank you Rick, that example does indeed show the similarity between these early Islamic broadswords and the famed Sudanese examples, emphasizing the blade.

You're right Stuart, the term 'mameluke' does apply to the Ottoman form hilts on military officers sabres of Great Britain and France. After the Napoleonic campaigns in Egypt at the end of the 18th century, the armies of these powers greatly impressed by the Mamluk horsemen of Egypt, adopted sabres of the style carried by them, thus the hilt form became known as 'mameluke'.

The Mamluks were a military caste who served Muslim Caliphs and Ayyubid Sultans during the middle ages, and in the Crusades. They became warrior rulers with the Mamluk Sultanate ruling in Egypt and Syria from 1250-1517.

The sword shown here is stated to be Mamluk of 14th century, of which a number of the swords that appear in the Yucel work include.

While Victorian writers perpetuated the romaticized idea that the 'kaskara' swords of the Sudan were either actual swords of the Crusaders or at least carrying thier blades, it is now generally held that these broadswords evolved from the swords of early Islam, such as these Mamluk forms.

All best regards,
Jim
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Old 10th October 2008, 05:59 AM   #7
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They had magnificent pieces ! None of them went for less that ~$3-4K, and some Islamic pieces went for $30-60K ( auction house premium not included).
Possibilities:
1. People still have money to spend on toys despite tough economic times.
2. Antique weapons are a good investment
3. Most likely one: I have heard that there is a world-wide run on Indian, Chinese and Russian (+ related areas) objects of art. There is a glut of "nuveau riches" there and they repatriate their historic weapons. This is similar to what happened in the 1980s with Nihonto. Interestingly, Nihonto this time around were much more restrained economically.
None of us, I reckon, are in the same league..... "If I were a rich man..."

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Old 10th October 2008, 06:05 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim McDougall
Thank you Rick, that example does indeed show the similarity between these early Islamic broadswords and the famed Sudanese examples, emphasizing the blade.

You're right Stuart, the term 'mameluke' does apply to the Ottoman form hilts on military officers sabres of Great Britain and France. After the Napoleonic campaigns in Egypt at the end of the 18th century, the armies of these powers greatly impressed by the Mamluk horsemen of Egypt, adopted sabres of the style carried by them, thus the hilt form became known as 'mameluke'.

The Mamluks were a military caste who served Muslim Caliphs and Ayyubid Sultans during the middle ages, and in the Crusades. They became warrior rulers with the Mamluk Sultanate ruling in Egypt and Syria from 1250-1517.

The sword shown here is stated to be Mamluk of 14th century, of which a number of the swords that appear in the Yucel work include.

While Victorian writers perpetuated the romaticized idea that the 'kaskara' swords of the Sudan were either actual swords of the Crusaders or at least carrying thier blades, it is now generally held that these broadswords evolved from the swords of early Islam, such as these Mamluk forms.

All best regards,
Jim

Thanks Jim for the clarification.
Regards Stu
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Old 10th October 2008, 10:48 PM   #9
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You bet Stu!! Thank you for the opportunity and good observation!!

Ariel, I'm glad you came in on this as I hoped you would, and I was also hoping you might offer comments and observations on this Mamluk sword...that is from a historical standpoint.

All best regards,
Jim
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Old 11th October 2008, 01:27 AM   #10
Gavin Nugent
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Default Don't dispair

Quote:
Originally Posted by ariel
They had magnificent pieces ! None of them went for less that ~$3-4K, and some Islamic pieces went for $30-60K ( auction house premium not included).
Possibilities:
1. People still have money to spend on toys despite tough economic times.
2. Antique weapons are a good investment
3. Most likely one: I have heard that there is a world-wide run on Indian, Chinese and Russian (+ related areas) objects of art. There is a glut of "nuveau riches" there and they repatriate their historic weapons. This is similar to what happened in the 1980s with Nihonto. Interestingly, Nihonto this time around were much more restrained economically.
None of us, I reckon, are in the same league..... "If I were a rich man..."




Yeah but where the fun be in being able to buy anything you want at the drop of a hat.....oh what am I saying...it would be fun...but you know as well as the next man that the sleepers are still to be found....Awaken Sleeper!!!

Gav
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