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Old 15th August 2006, 01:49 PM   #1
Valjhun
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Default good battle quality flyssa

One of the oldest. Verry nice massive thick and laminated blade. Should I etch it to see the pattern more clearly?

84 cm overall.

Not the usual thiny bladed hanger but an excellent combat quality sword.
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Old 15th August 2006, 02:56 PM   #2
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Were I you; I'd just leave it as it is .
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Old 15th August 2006, 06:12 PM   #3
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Do not touch it.
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Old 15th August 2006, 07:13 PM   #4
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Leave it as it is; it is currently in a stable state.

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Old 15th August 2006, 08:57 PM   #5
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It would be a shame to etch it IMHO......

The notch on the back before the false edge is interesting...is it there to relieve stress and shock to the blade ? Or has it another function?
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Old 16th August 2006, 04:59 AM   #6
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Puullleeese leave it as is!!!!! Outstanding worn old warrior.
Is the back edge of the blade sharpened up to that raised section? Check the discussion on 'Old 1900's Indian sword'...same type feature.
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Old 16th August 2006, 02:48 PM   #7
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Is this a flyssa, or a yatagan? It looks more like a Black Sea yatagan to me.

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Old 17th August 2006, 05:14 PM   #8
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JUDL!!!
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Old 17th August 2006, 05:18 PM   #9
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Actually I also thought the same thing - can be a Trabzon short sword, but I don't know much about flyssas, so if you say its flyssa, flyssa it is.
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Old 18th August 2006, 08:06 AM   #10
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It could be, actually the quality of the blade suggests so, BUT it is not a short sword (84 cm), the hilt is wooden and of totally different design and finally there should be fullers all over it if it were from Black Sea region.

So I still think that it is an archaic form flyssa, lets say around 1800.
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Old 18th August 2006, 08:16 AM   #11
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also looks like a batak kalasan, except for the hilting & integral bolster - the blade shape seems fairly universal. was there a scabbard with it? that could be diagnostic. (overall looks like an old undecorated flyssa to me)
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Old 19th August 2006, 10:10 PM   #12
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This sword of course is what appears a munitions grade or fighting example of the Kabyle flyssa (Algerian Berber tribe). While there remains interesting speculation and suggestions concerning the fundamental similarities between these and the Black Sea yataghan (Kurdish-Armenian or Transcaucasian yataghan in most resources), there are no established connections between the two. While Caucasian weapons are certainly known in Algerian armouries, likely from mercenaries for Ottomans, both the 'Black Sea' and the flyssa appear to be forms that evolved around second quarter of 19th c.

The earliest known flyssa is stated c.1827, and the earliest provenanced example I have found was 1857 (captured by French Foreign Legion in combat). Independantly, the Black Sea yataghan, as I have noted on the latest incarnation of that discussion has earliest provenanced examples c.1850 in Turkish regions.

I would love to find examples of either of these that might move back the origination of these forms, but as far as I know, no evidence exists prior to the dates I have mentioned.

Also a complete puzzle is the actual use of the flyssa, which to me (and again I emphasize I have only lay knowledge of martial arts) would be difficult at best as it is terribly balanced for slashing, the grip is inadequate in size and without guard or and support for the hand. To use it as a lance or thrusting weapon, there is again no hand support. I am not aware of any narrative describing these swords in use, but perhaps any of our readers who have access to French Foreign Legion narratives of combat with these Berber tribes may be able to help.

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Old 19th August 2006, 10:23 PM   #13
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I think the big knife type of Flyssa is held much in the same way as a great many of Indonesian knives with a small handle for Europeans, that is often held with a thumb and forefinger on the forte. The Flyssa then is a very keen blade, the thin ones very much a rib tickler .
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Old 20th August 2006, 06:29 PM   #14
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This is only a small one but I think you could go twice the length, which would make this 75cm overall. Very similar to the one starting the thread. Held in this fashion would be quite comfortable as they are a light fast weapon. Deadly, like all those thin daggers from around the Mediterranean.
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Old 20th August 2006, 10:12 PM   #15
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I could also see this blade working well with a kanjar (icepick) type grip.
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