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Old 13th February 2018, 02:42 AM   #1
Rafngard
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Default Two 1940's(?) Gunongs

Hello All,

I've had these two for a little bit, but hadn't really posted photos of them.

I *think* these are from the 40s (+/- a few years).
They're also BIG. The blades are both diamond in cross section and they are massive wedges of steel. one has Aluminum fittings, the other might be silver.

Any and all opinions on these are welcome.

Thanks.
Leif
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Old 13th February 2018, 07:14 AM   #2
kronckew
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OOPs, It double posted...Mods - pls. remove this one.
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Old 13th February 2018, 07:21 AM   #3
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Cool gunongs. very similar to mine, i like the banded grip decoration too. The blade decor looks very close to mine; wonder if it was made by the same crew.

I did a light etch on mine, ithas a hamon-like hardened edge. your's may too.

discussed HERE
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Old 13th February 2018, 05:05 PM   #4
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Just beautiful examples! I like this style by gunongs very much and agree with your given time frame. The blades could also be laminated, my both examples from this time have laminated blades. Nice pieces you have posted today!

Regards,
Detlef
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Old 13th February 2018, 06:10 PM   #5
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I really like these gunongs especially with their almost "over the top" decorative hilts. Could you possibly post a close-up photo or two showing the hilt of the larger one (the one with the aluminum sheath fittings) that will give a more detailed view of its construction? Two very nice additions to your collection.

Best,
Robert
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Old 13th February 2018, 10:16 PM   #6
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Thank you for all the kind comments all!

As requested, here's a few more of the big one.

Thanks,
Leif
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Old 14th February 2018, 12:21 AM   #7
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I agree that these are WWII 40s. Yes one is aluminum which was in abundance from downed planes back then.

The other seems to have white metal (nickel/copper alloy) with one thin strip of silver on it. I would place this during the same time as well.
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Old 14th February 2018, 05:49 AM   #8
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Aluminum (just to be different they call it Aluminium here in the UK) prior to the start of commercial production around 1855, was considered a rare metal and was more costly than gold. A lady wore an Aluminum necklace with pride that her husband could afford it... late19c saw the hall process and swiftly aluminum was available for structural uses...The aircraft industry, especially after ww1 and duralumin alloys used it extensively, especially after all metal aircraft started being made. It also binds agressively with oxygen, forming a protective layer on the surface that essentially stops further oxidation, unlike iron, abrasion doesn't open up the metal to further oxidation as the surface oxide layer is essentially instantly replaced. It does tend to develop a whitish cast over time from other chemicals, such as salt...Anodizing with sulphuric or chromic acid produces a thicker oxide layer and increases corrosion resistance.

It's also used in other weapons systems, and industrial applications as 'Thermite', a mix of aluminum powder and iron oxide, which when ignited produces a ferocious reaction as the aluminum 'steals' the oxygen from the iron, plus a lot of heat, which melts the iron which can then cut thru a lot of stuff, or weld the ends of steel tracks....

In relation to it's use in edged weapon components, it is not a bad thing.
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