Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > Ethnographic Weapons
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12th January 2018, 10:58 PM   #1
Ian
Vikingsword Staff
 
Ian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Little House on the Prairie
Posts: 2,324
Default Mandaya keping

The attached picture is of a Mandaya keping. It's a keping because that is what the label on the back of the sheath says.

I have never heard of this weapon before, and I can find nothing online about it or in any of my references. There are several pictures of the usual Mandaya bolo on this site, and this sword has some similarity, notably a fat bellied blade that looks a bit like a barung, but that's about all. The general condition suggests manufacture in the second half of the 20th C.

I'm wary of edged weapons in metal scabbards from Mindanao because these often turn out to be decorative items aimed at people who travel. However, this one caught my eye because the laminated blade is well forged and the overall quality seemed good. When I first saw it, I thought it was a tourist piece made in the Lake Lanao region by Maranao craftsmen--but the antique vendor insisted it was Mandayan and he had never misled me about other items. I bought it in 2002 because it was unusual and inexpensive.

Has anyone come across a similar large knife/small sword from the Mandaya? OAL out of the sheath is 16 inches.

Ian.

.
Attached Images
  
Ian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th January 2018, 07:46 PM   #2
Battara
EAAF Staff
 
Battara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 5,852
Default

I hate to say this Ian but to me the workmanship doesn't look Mandaya, never mind the form. In fact, the chasing work looks more Mindanao Moro and the form of course looks Sulu-ish. I see nothing Mandaya about it.

It is interesting though and I agree it looks late 20th century.
Battara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th January 2018, 08:13 PM   #3
Ian
Vikingsword Staff
 
Ian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Little House on the Prairie
Posts: 2,324
Default

Hi Jose. Yes, that was my strong feeling also when I first saw this piece--one of those tourist items from the Lake Lanao region that are mostly junk, with thin blades made of sheet metal. That's why this one was surprising.

Even if it is of Maranao origin and of that variety of items made for tourists, this is a very good knife and much better quality than most of what we see in that genre. The blade is solid to the hilt, is a quarter inch thick just in front of the hilt, and has a sharpened hardened edge--the brass work is reasonable too. For what I paid for it, I'm perfectly okay if it's not a Mandayan piece. The dealer who sold it to me has had many opportunities to sell me rubbish before and he has not tried to do so. I think he genuinely believed it was of Mandayan origin, but he could have been wrong.

That the Mandaya and other Lumad tribes borrow heavily from Moro weapons is well documented, and we have often discussed that here. It's possible that this piece was made by a Maranao craftsman for a Mandayan.

Thanks for taking the time to share your thoughts.

Cheers,

Ian
Ian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th January 2018, 08:18 PM   #4
Battara
EAAF Staff
 
Battara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 5,852
Default

I will also say that you and I both have seen good old quality blades reused and recycled for later use.

Your dealer may have just been ignorant of style and tribal origin, even going off of what the prior owner said mistakenly.
Battara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th January 2018, 08:57 PM   #5
Ian
Vikingsword Staff
 
Ian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Little House on the Prairie
Posts: 2,324
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Battara
I will also say that you and I both have seen good old quality blades reused and recycled for later use.

Your dealer may have just been ignorant of style and tribal origin, even going off of what the prior owner said mistakenly.
Yep. Good quality blades are often recycled when folks can get hold of them. This one looks as though it may have been a barung at one time.

Ian.
Ian is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT. The time now is 05:01 AM.


Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.