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Old 25th November 2017, 01:04 AM   #1
kahnjar1
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Default Flintlock Pistol for Comment and ID

It has taken quite some time, but at last I have this pistol in my collection.
Overall length approx 19" (480mm). Smooth bore of approx 14mm.
The barrel bears script similar to that which I have seen on Albanian Tanchika muskets, and the lock also is inscribed, but I can not decipher what it says. The barrel has a makers???stamp, again not familiar to me. I have not removed the barrel and do not intend to do so in case I damage the wirework by removing the 2 pins whichhold it in place.
The rammer is false and the back of the stock and butt are decorated with corals. The butt decoration may be a coloured stone of some sort or glass.
Any information or suggestions as to the origin of this piece would be appreciated.
Stu
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Old 25th November 2017, 01:05 AM   #2
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Old 25th November 2017, 03:23 PM   #3
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Hi Stu.

Congratulations !! That is a really nice pistol for your collection.
Looks to be unmolested, with a nice, even age patina throughout. Looks like about 99% of the wire inlay is still intact. And the coral stones really add to it. Yes, the butt cap looks to be glass. But a really nice touch. Overall, the gun looks entirely locally made. Probably from one of the many gunshops in the Balkans. Most of these pistols are unmarked. I hope someone can make an attempt at translating.
BARREL: You're right, that lettering on the barrel does look similar to Tanchika barrels I've seen. There does seem to be a makers stamp on the barrel. Of course the barrel could have been an import and stamped latter during assembly. Most of these pistols make the use of barrel bands. So it's interesting to see this one using pins to fasten. A possible clue to European barrel origin (?) But you would have to take the barrel off to see if the pin keepers were made at the same time as the barrel, or added later during assembly. I wouldn't bother in this case, as you mention.
LOCK: The lock looks typical, locally made Balkan lock, with a style you see on many of these pistols. I can't make out the lettering, but the bottom line looks like an attempt to spell: WARRENTED (?) The inside of the lock also looks typical Balkan. It looks like the mainspring was replaced at sometime. Note the empty hole where the original mainspring screw once resided. A similar, but not exact, mainspring was fitted and wedged at/under the pan. There is possibly a pin from the mainspring inside the hole that once held a screw. I've seen this fix on many locks. It would have been easier to do this with a spring that was readily available versus making a new, exact fir spring. Also, note the sear spring was replaced with a stiff piece of spring wire versus a flat, original style spring. I've seen this type of fix also. But as long as the lock is working, I wouldn't bother replacing anything.

Again, a very nice pistol Stu. Sure would not mind having it in my collection. Nice find.

Rick
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Old 26th November 2017, 09:24 AM   #4
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This is a really nice pistol in a very good condition. Its gunmaker tried to imitate the European style and I think he added a signature without any knowledge of what he had to write. He just lined up letters of the European alphabet without any sense.
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Old 26th November 2017, 11:17 AM   #5
fernando
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corrado26
...Its gunmaker tried to imitate the European style and I think he added a signature without any knowledge of what he had to write. He just lined up letters of the European alphabet without any sense ...

Apparently an usual procedure .
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Old 26th November 2017, 05:54 PM   #6
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That looks nice Stu. Congratulations!
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Old 26th November 2017, 08:54 PM   #7
Oliver Pinchot
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The unusual combination of dense lineal inlay of this type (usually in pewter wire,) and gems, glass or otherwise, is characteristic of Ottoman Syria in the second half of the 19th century.

There is a similar variant which is mounted with a spherical butt (occasionally a flattened sphere,) showing influence from the weapons of Circassians who were posted in the Ottoman provinces.
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Old 27th November 2017, 12:34 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fernando
Apparently an usual procedure .

Unfortunately, yes.
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Old 27th November 2017, 12:35 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oliver Pinchot
The unusual combination of dense lineal inlay of this type (usually in pewter wire,) and gems, glass or otherwise, is characteristic of Ottoman Syria in the second half of the 19th century.

There is a similar variant which is mounted with a spherical butt (occasionally a flattened sphere,) showing influence from the weapons of Circassians who were posted in the Ottoman provinces.

Thanks Oliver for the reply. Interesting.

Rick
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