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Old 2nd January 2017, 08:05 PM   #1
Ian
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Default The Dutch Maréchaussée Sword a.k.a. the Dutch Klewang

I have been much fascinated by the “Dutch klewang” as a hybrid of European and local Indonesian design. It was born out of the need to arm native police (the maréchaussée) with a suitable sword to use in Sumatra, notably in Aceh, when combating local insurgents. Over the winter break I have been reading an excellent account on the history of this sword (1), which prompted me to write some notes for my own reference. In looking over what I have written, it seemed some of this information might be of use to others who have an interest in these swords.

First, a word about the police and security forces who were termed marechaussee. The Corps de Maréchaussée was created by King William I in 1814 to replace the gendarmerie (a word with negative connotations at that time). The marechaussee was tasked with maintaining public order, law enforcement, and safeguarding the main roads. Although not specifically mentioned, this included police duties for the army. As such, the marechaussee was part of the national police (rijkspolitie). Similar groups were established in the Dutch colonies and were similarly titled the marechaussee. Today the Koninklijke Maréchaussée, the Royal Netherlands Maréchaussée, abbreviated to KMar (in English this translates to Royal Marshals, but commonly described as Royal Military Constabulary), is one of the four Services of the armed forces of the Netherlands. It is now a gendarmerie force performing military police and civil police duties. (2)

The Dutch klewang sword was initially developed for the Korps Mareschauuse in Atjet en Onderhoorigheden (Military Constabulary Corps in Atjeh and Dependencies). The Corps was founded in 1890 and administered as a division in the Netherlands East India (NEI) Army, and was regarded as an elite force. Aceh had been a problem area throughout the Dutch colonial period. The Acinese Wars began in 1873 and by the 1880s the area was so violent and the Dutch had so little control that they needed a special counter-guerilla group to address the violence. Between 1873 and 1891, the NEI Army had lost 235 officers and 6,039 other ranks.

The Mareschaussee were organized in brigades of 15-20 men led by a European sergeant who commanded a second sergeant, a corporal and 15 men, all non-Europeans (1). The natives were mostly from the Moluccas. The mareschaussee were initially issued a standard cavalry saber and military hacking knife (kapmes), and were permitted to carry an optional klewang and an optional keris, both of native manufacture. The regular issue sabers were found to be too heavy and cumbersome for the local natives to wield, so the optional klewang became an important weapon for them. These were mainly sikin panjang, peudeung, or rudus, essentially the same weapons thet were being used against them by the Acinese (1). The Acinese, for their part, relied heavily on surprise ambushes and their slashing swords which caused devastating wounds to their victims. The firearms of the NEI Army were rather basic and included single shot and repeating rifles, but the attacks occurred with such suddenness that there was barely time to get off a single shot let alone reload or chamber another round. Handguns were also found to be of limited value in close quarters fighting. Hence the need for a reliable sword with a decent handguard.

The first mareschaussee regulation sword was introduced in 1898. There were, however, pre-regulation patterns that were tested. The testing of these prototypes and subsequent models was documented in the Beknopte Overzichten (Concise Reviews), referred to as “BoPo.” The BoPo 1897 stated that the Marechaussee in Aceh “… were armed with a klewang with a steel blade taken from a number of Acinese blades fitted with the hilt of a cavalry sword.” Some of these makeshift swords have survived but are exceedingly rare. An example of a pre-regulation sword (Pattern I) is shown (A) in the attached Figure.

When the supply of Acinese blades proved insufficient, the NEI Army obtained further blades from a Sundanese swordsmith in Tjikeroeh. These were produced with more or less standardized blades forged at Tjikeroeh and the hilts were from NEI cavalry swords, M1846 or M 1875. An example of this pre-regulation sword (Pattern II) is shown in (B) in the attached Figure.

The sabel mareschaussee, M 1898—see (C) in the attached Figure.

The BoPo of 1897 also referred to a final prototype with a modified hilt (1):
“During a second extension of the Marechaussee Corps in 1896 the stock of cavalry sword hilts was not sufficient to manufacture a new supply of 120 klewangs. Since at that time trials were being carried out by the Inspection of Portable Arms to fit lighter hilts to the klewang blades, resulting in the weight being transferred more towards the point of the blade, it was decided to introduce these hilts in the Corps on a trial basis. The result of these trials will be published in a later report.”
[Note: This reference is the only time the word klewang is used in an official document until 1940; the sword is consistently termed the marechausseesabel during the period 1897–1940 (1).]

No mention was made in the BoPo 1897 of the development of the new blade, and Puype & de Stühler Boekwijt (1) found “… no evidence as to where it was developed, by whom and after which example, despite an intensive search of the records. For we are clearly dealing with an entirely new designed blade. The only official clue is the drawing added to BoPo 1898 … [which] shows the principal characteristics of the new marechausseesabel M 1898.”

For various reasons, the marechaussee M 1898 swords were supplied by German manufacturers (Lüneschloss, Solingen and Rheinische Metallwaaren- und Maschinefabrik [RMM], Sömmerda). Other Solingen companies, including August & Albert Schnitzler, were sub-contracted to provide separate sword blades. Most scabbards were made in the Construction Workshops of the Artillerie Inrichtingen, the Ordinance or Artillery Works at Surabaya (1).

Production of marechaussee sword M 1898
Lüneschoss....................... 800 complete swords
Lüneschoss and RMM... 2,800 sword blades
RMM.............................. 4,200 complete swords
.......................................... 150 separate hilts
.......................................... 650 grips
Puype & de Stühler Boekwijt (1) note that the size of these orders likely exceeded the needs of the marechaussee corps, and that from 1905 onward the NEI Army started to use the sword as well.

The mareschausseesabel, M 1905—see (D) in the attached Figure.

Complaints were soon forthcoming about the deficiencies of the M 1898 sword. Of particular concern was the relatively narrow tang of the blade, which was only riveted to the top of the backstrap, and its tendency to break under heavy use. This resulted in a modification whereby the backstrap was screwed to the end of the tang (replacing the prior use of rivet), which was a considerable improvement because the seating of the hilt could be tightened when the latter became loose with the wear and tear of heavy use.

Important changes were also occurring at this time in the NEI ordinance organization. The Artillerie Inrichtingen (State Ordinance or Artillery Works) did not have the drop forges needed to make these swords, hence the dependence on German manufacturers. In 1898 the Ordinance Works moved from Delft to new factories near the Hem Bridge across the North Sea Canal between Amsterdam and Zaandam. As a result, the Ordinance Works came to use the trade name HEMBRUG on all their products made there. It would be some time before the Ordinance Works acquired the necessary forges to produce their swords, and they were largely restricted to making grips, hilt baskets, backstraps, and grip ferrules. An important function was to rigorously test the sword blades coming from Germany, and many of these were found to be faulty, with hair cracks being detected in large numbers.

With improved quality control and a slightly modified hilt, the mareschausseesabel M 1905 was a better and more reliable sword than the original M 1898. In total, about 2,600 of the M 1905 were produced, and many of these found their way to non-rifle bearing soldiers in the NEI Army as well as to the colonial marechaussee (1).

The mareschausseesabel, M 1911—see (E) in the attached Figure.

The M 1905 was a small incremental improvement, but the M 1911 had a redesigned grip and a new blade-tang. The backstrap was removed from the grip and the tang was widened to the width of the blade. The screwed tang mounting was retained, two wooden scales were riveted to the tang, and the sheet-steel hilt basket of the M 1898 was retained. Most marechaussee swords M 1911 bear the maker’s name of HEMBRUG but a few unmarked blades are found and are presumed to be of German manufacture (1).

The M 1911 pattern also came with a newly designed scabbard (see attached Figure). Changes to the chape included a slight lengthening and straightening, and a further lengthening in 1932.

Production of the mareschausseesabel M 1911 at Hem Bridge continued until Holland was overrun by Germany in May 1940. Puype & de Stühler Boekwijt (1) report that 26,172 swords were produced at Hem Bridge in the period 1911–1940. In 1939 a total of 7,000 complete swords, plus 2,500 blades and 3,000 hilts were produced—of these about half were shipped to the Netherlands East Indies just before the German occupation in 1940.

The marechausseesabel, M 1940, M 1941—see (F) and (G) in the attached Figure

With the occupation of Holland by Germany in 1940, the supply of swords to the NEI Army and the Marechaussee Corps came to a halt. Alternative sources were needed for defense of the NEI, and to supply the expansion of defense forces in the event of a Pacific war. The colonial Artillery Works at Bandung, Java began to assemble swords in 1940, initially from parts sent from Holland and later from swords entirely produced in the NEI. The latter became known as the M 1940 (see (F) in attached figure) and differed from the M 1911 in several ways: the grip scales were made of black Bakelite instead of wood; the blade was of a different steel, with an entirely different shape of the edge; no maker’s mark; all of the brass scabbard mounts were blackened (see attached Figure).

Supplies produced in the NEI could not keep up with the local demand. The only potential source for these was the USA. The U.S. Naval Cutlass Model 1917 was derived from the marechausseesabel M 1911 but the hilt and scabbard differed. It had a solid cup guard instead of a basket, blackened checkered hand grips, and the blade was stamped “USN.” A variant of this sword, identified as the marechausseesabel M 1911, was produced by the US Navy in 1941 to equip its own ships (1).

In 1941, Dutch interests in New York were able to commission and send 2,950 swords and 500 sword blades to the NEI. These were provided by the VINCE Fencing Equipment Inc, NY and the blades were produced by Lilley-Ames. The marechausseesabel produced in the US for the NEI has been titled Klewang O.I., M 1941 (O.I. standing for Ost Indies)—see (G) in the attached Figure. This sword differed from the M 1911 in the apertures between the bars of the basket hilt—these are missing the characteristic “broken corners” found on the European hilts. The scabbards also differed in that they were heavier and more crudely finished than the M 1911 and M 1940.

The Military Saddlery Company (MILSCO), Milwaukee, Wisconsin produced at least 40,000 klewang starting in 1946, and supplied these to the Dutch East Indies until the time of Indonesian independence in 1949. Pupye & de Stühler Boekwijt (1) suspect that many of the 40,000 klewang ordered by the NEI Army in 1946 may not have reached the Dutch East Indies before Indonesian independence. This may explain the presence on the surplus market from 1950 onwards of a large number of MILSCO klewangs, many still wrapped in their factory-supplied greased paper. Some MILSCO klewangs also ended up with the US Army.

Because all of the MILSCO swords were produced from 1946, none of these saw action in WWII. They are the most common form of these swords seen on the market today and are often mistaken for the original Dutch sword.

Summary of distinguishing features of the major marechausseesabel models

Model 1898 Original model. Cavalry hilt with sheet steel basket and backstrap secured by rivet to the tang.

Model 1905 Same as original model but sheet steel basket modified with backstrap of guard secured with a screw. Quality control exercised by the Ordinance Office and blades stamped with HEMBRUG. Minor changes to scabbard.

Model 1911 Completely redesigned hilt-tang: hilt of two wood slabs riveted to the tang; full width tang; elimination of backstrap and securing of sheet metal basket with a screw to the end of the tang. Modified scabbard, further changed in 1932 by lengthening the chape.

Model 1940 Manufactured in Netherlands East Indies. No manufacturer’s markings. Blade made of different steel and edge grind different. Blackened scabbard fittings. Black Bakelite grip scales.

Model 1941 Entirely US made. Slightly different basket style. Heavier scabbards stitched along the edge rather than centrally on the back. Blued blade and basket hilt. Made by VINCE or MILSCO.

References

(1) Puype, JP & de Stürler Boekwijt, RJ. Klewang. Catalogus van het Legermuseum (Catalogue of the Dutch Army Museum). KNIL, Landmacht, Zeemacht, Marechaussee en Politie. Royal Netherlands Army and Arms Museum: Delft, 2001, pp 344.
[An excellent account of the Dutch Klewang. A must have reference for anyone interested in these swords. Copies can be purchased online from The Netherlands.]


(2) Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Marechaussee


Figure. Styles of marechausseesabel

A = Pre-regulation sword (Pattern I); B = Pre-regulation sword (Pattern II);
C = Model 1898; D = Model 1905; E = Model 1911;
F = Model 1940; G = Model 1941; H = Unidentified model
(from
Puype & de Stürler Boekwijt [1])
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Last edited by Ian : 24th January 2017 at 12:56 AM.
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Old 3rd January 2017, 04:24 AM   #2
Amuk Murugul
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Hullo Ian,

This link provides complementary info which may be of use:
http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...hlight=kalewang

Best,
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Old 5th January 2017, 04:57 AM   #3
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Amuk:

Thank you for the additional information and the link. I shall try to transport over some of those data to this thread, and then we can have it all in one place.

Ian.
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Old 9th January 2017, 12:24 PM   #4
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Hi Ian, that's a great summary and an interesting read - thank you.
Yours as well Amuk - it would be good to combine the threads.

Apart from a Hembrug and an unmarked US Model I also have an H type which I will record here.

According to Puype this sword was made by shortening the NEI Cavalary sword M.1875 and forming a clipped point. Note that the fuller runs right through the point. The hilt was reduced in weight by thinning the plate, drilling two 1.5 cm holes in the bottom of the guard and removing 2 cm of guard where it protruded towards the wearer. All metal is blued and the handle is dark wood.

The sword was in use from 1904 to approx 1920 and issued mostly to 'mounted police servants' protecting plantations and Ministry of Finance police chasing opium runners.

This blade was made by PD Luneschloss and has an inspectors stamp on each individual piece of metal - the blade and the 3 parts of the hilt assembly. It is also stamped K 2.

CC
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Old 9th January 2017, 02:33 PM   #5
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Thanks CC. That's a very interesting pre-regulation marechaussee sword. Your suggestion of combining the two threads is a good one and I will look into how to do that in the next few days.

Thanks again for posting your sword.

Ian
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Old 9th January 2017, 09:59 PM   #6
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Ian,
I would like to thank you very much for posting this wonderfully detailed material on these swords, and how as regulation military and civil swords they often paralleled their ethnographic counterparts. It seems that often civil and para military or police swords present challenges in proper identification as they fall into grey areas of patterns and known forms.
I recall a paper titled something like klewang vs. the M1917 US Navy cutlass but cannot relocate.

Amuk and CC, thank you as well for your great input!

It is very much appreciated to have such material added into the ever growing archived resources here, which stand as important research material for study.

Jim
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Old 12th January 2017, 12:36 PM   #7
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This is a masterful thread...taking the reader on a detailed tour of the subject thus, it is educational and informative ... A thesis of detail and facts. Great notes on an otherwise not covered subject and placed on Forum for all to see and refer to in Library. Now that's what I call A Thread !

The reference at at #2 above is superb and I was redirected on a web search to http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=10287 an early thread back in 2009... now all in support and reflected in this fine thread..

An interesting detail exists on how to fight with this weapon at http://www.bruchius.com/docs/Fighti...%20by%20RvN.pdf

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.

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Old 21st January 2017, 08:27 PM   #8
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This thread is highly complemented by an earlier discussion here. Below is an important contribution from Amuk Marugul which started off that previous thread. I have copied over his post in its entirety, and reattached his pictures. As you can see, the summary of the material researched by Pupuye and de Stürler Boekwijt is skillfully elucidated upon in this post.

------------------------------

Hullo everybody!

ENJOY!

A selected representative sample, including data which may not be available elsewhere.

Developed in the field for use in close-combat and brush-clearing, thus combining the functions of golok and cutlass. It was mainly to counter the devastatingly effective blades of the Atjehans.
Optimised to suit indigenous personnel ( i.e. strength, length and weight ).
A cutlass-fencing regime was designed specifically for its use.
As demand for kalewangs far outstripped local production, production was transferred to Europe ( 1898 ); mainly Soemmerda and Solingen, as Hembrug was not yet ready for production-line operation ( 1912 ).
European-made blades of regulation-kalewangs were subjected to stringent bending-tests: they had to withstand a bending of 5cm. without breaking and then be able to resume their straight form.

*N.B. The alphanumeric: M....., denotes the European Model number.

Operation in the tropics necessitated protective/anti-corrosion coating on blades:

European blades:
Pre-M1905 - no bluing
M1905 onwards - 'browning' ( blue-black colour )

USA blades:
VINCE - 'parkerised' ( opaque grey )
LILLY-AMES - 'blued' ( blue )
MILSCO - 1946 - 'browning' ( blue-black )
- post-1946 - 'parkerised' ( opaque grey )


With reference to Fig.1, anti-clockwise:

1 Kalewang ( Pedang Marsose ) 1903 SOEMMERDA (M1898)
Blade: LxOALxWxT = 60x72x3.53x0.49cm
Beginning of sword handle
Back-slide fixed by hammered tang ( Fig.4 )


2 Kalewang ( Pedang Marsose ) 1909 SOLINGEN (M1905)
Blade: LxOALxWxT = 61.5x74.5x3.53x0.66cm
Beginning of back-slide fixed by tang-screw (Fig.4 )


3 Kalewang ( Pedang Marsose ) 1909 SOEMMERDA (M1905)
Blade: LxOALxWxT = 61x63x3.55x1.00cm
I.D.: P.A.L./389 = Pasoeroean, Malang & Probolinggo Regional Police

4 Kalewang ( Pedang Marsose ) 1910 HEMBRUG (M1905)
Blade:LxOALxWxT = 61x73.5x3.45x0.54cm
Finger-loop hole ( Fig.3 )

5 Kalewang ( Pedang Marsose ) 1918 SOLINGEN (M1911)
Blade: LxOALxWxT = 62.5x74.5x3.57x0.49cm
I.D.: P.A.K./406 = Kediri & Blitar Regional Police
Beginning of knife handle

6 Kalewang ( Pedang Marsose ) 1927 HEMBRUG (M1911)
Blade: LxOALxWxT = 62x74.5x3.53x0.45cm
I.D.: P.A.O./571 = Batavia Metropolitan Police

7 Kalewang ( Pedang Marsose ) 1940 HEMBRUG (M1911)
Blade:LxOALxWxT=62x73.5x3.54x0.1cm
I.D.: 2-Bar.III/156 = 2nd.Co., Soemenep Corps

8 Kalewang ( Pedang Marsose ) 1941 LILLEY-AMES (M1911)
Blade: LxOALxWxT=63X75.5x3.58x0.57cm
Bakelite scales
Acquired by US Army

9 Kalewang ( Pedang Marsose ) 1941 LILLEY-AMES (M1911)
Blade: LxOALxWxT=63.0x75.0x3.55x0.59cm
Bakelite scales
Acquired by US Navy

10 Kalewang ( Pedang Marsose) 1941 VINCE
Blade: LxOALxWxT=62x74.5x3.53x0.57cm
Beginning of hickory scales and
Beginning of rounded clip-point tips ( Fig.7 )

11 Kalewang ( Pedang Marsose ) 1946 VINCE
Blade: LxOALxWxT=63x75x3.59x0.45cm
Beginning of guard-holes with no 'broken corners' (Fig.5 )

12 Kalewang ( Pedang Marsose ) 1946A MILSCO
Blade: LxOALxWxT=61x73.5x3.6x0.45cm
Wrist-loop hole with rounded ends ( Fig.8 )
Larger fuller

13 Kalewang ( Pedang Marsose ) 1946A MILSCO
Blade: LxOALxWxT=62x74x3.55x0.49cm
Wrist-loop hole with rounded ends ( Fig.8 )

14 Kalewang ( Pedang Marsose ) 1946A VINCE
Blade:LxOALxWxT=62x74x3.55x0.46cm
Wrist-loop hole with rounded ends( Fig.8 )
Top portion of guard shaved off
ExTNI-AD Div.VI-Siliwangi HQ Bandoeng

15 Kalewang ( Pedang Marsose ) 1946A VINCE
Blade: LxOALxWxT=62x74x3.65x0.49cm
Began wrist-loop hole with rounded ends ( Fig.8 )


PRE-REGULATION EXAMPLES ( Fig.9 ):

1 Kalewang Djago ( De Haan ) 1875

2 Kalewang Atjeh 1880 ( Gliwang Ladieng with M1845/54 handle )

3 Kalewang Walanda 1895 GEVELSBERG ( El Gallito / De Haan )

4 Kalewang 1895 SOERABAIA ( based on M1876 sabre )

5 Kalewang Toemang 1898 TJIKEROEH ( based on M1876 sabre )


Best,


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Old 21st January 2017, 08:36 PM   #9
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Continuing with posts on the previous thread, here is an example posted by Wayne Kroncke.

------------------------------------

Mine, black Solingen blade, razor sharp & needle sharp point, no markings on guard or grips, guard perforations have 'broken' corners.

Blade 62.3 cm. loa 72.5, width at guard 35mm, 2.5 cm. from guard width is 30mm, width 5mm at forte. slotted screw pommel. 985 gm. with scabbard. 726 gm. w/o. - your 1911 no. 5/Kediri & Blitar Regional Police ?

Also shown: 1906 klewang in the form of a hunting sword, blade 26 in./66 cm.


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Old 21st January 2017, 08:38 PM   #10
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An important question from Ron de Ruiter on the previous thread:

--------------------------------

Hello Amuk Murugul,

Thanks for showing these klewangs (or Kelewangs) and the information. I collect klewangs for several years now and still I do not have all the inormation I would like to have. The book "Klewang" is very helpfull but is focussed on the museum collection. The book is not intended to be used to find out when or where your klewang is manufactured.

So, if you don't mind, I have a lot of questions.

- You have Hembrug klewangs in your collection and you have the year of manufacture. I have 6 Hembrug klewangs and I wondered how to determine their year of manufacture. For instance, I have a Hembrug M1911, marked with an "H" under a crown and has a brass plate on the basket stating P.A.N. 1499. The crown/H indicates inspector J.C.Harnas but I have no idea when this mark was used. I also found that the brass plate indicates it's use on Moerdara after 1931 by the Police forces. Is it possible to find out the year or period of manufacture?

- How do I recognize a Lilley-Ames klewang? Or is the klewang similar to the Vince but without the Vince mark? The one with the bakelite scales I know as the M1940 (based on the "Klewang" book)

- In fig 9, the pre-regulation Klewangs, you refer to the top one as Kalewang Djago ( De Haan ) 1875. Where does the "de Haan" come from? "Haan" is the Dutch word for "Rooster" and, according to the book "Klewang", de "Haan(-tjes)" klewang is the oldest type of klewang. Are there any marks on this Klewang?

Thanks and once again, nice collection!

Kind regards,
Ron de Ruiter
Netherlands

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Old 21st January 2017, 08:39 PM   #11
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And the replies to Ron's questions by Amuk.

--------------------------------

Hullo Ron,
Quote: Originally Posted by ruiter58 - You have Hembrug klewangs in your collection and you have the year of manufacture. I have 6 Hembrug klewangs and I wondered how to determine their year of manufacture. For instance, I have a Hembrug M1911, marked with an "H" under a crown and has a brass plate on the basket stating P.A.N. 1499. The crown/H indicates inspector J.C.Harnas but I have no idea when this mark was used. I also found that the brass plate indicates it's use on Moerdara after 1931 by the Police forces. Is it possible to find out the year or period of manufacture?
- P.A.N. = West & East- Madoera
1499 = Weapon number
You have to be sure the stamp belongs to the right person. Look closely at the type of crown and the font. There were many inspectors who had the same initial in their surname; there were at least two HARNASes; A.G and J.C.H. Once the right person has been determined, find find out when they were likely to have stamped the item. Any kalewang produced in HEMBRUG is unlikely to have been produced prior to 1912 and even then, only in insignificant ‘test’ numbers, as they didn’t have the capability. Other clues could be other signs/markings on the kalewang or sheath. Remember that 1931 was only when the directive was issued regarding the brass plates. In actual fact, many items prior to this were subsequently marked in compliance.
Quote: Originally Posted by ruiter58 - How do I recognize a Lilley-Ames klewang? Or is the klewang similar to the Vince but without the Vince mark? The one with the bakelite scales I know as the M1940 (based on the "Klewang" book)
- Lilley-Ames: similar to M1911, but no stamp on blade, sharp clip-point, blue blade, bakelite machete-handle ( I’ve haven't seen one with wooden scales), ‘uneven’ shaving/sharpening of cutting-edge. ( Unlikely to have been produced at ACW-Bdg, as they had no such facility other than to assemble/repair. )
Quote: Originally Posted by ruiter58 - In fig 9, the pre-regulation Klewangs, you refer to the top one as Kalewang Djago ( De Haan ) 1875. Where does the "de Haan" come from? "Haan" is the Dutch word for "Rooster" and, according to the book "Klewang", de "Haan(-tjes)" klewang is the oldest type of klewang. Are there any marks on this Klewang?
- If you go to the info again, you will see why items nos.1 & 3 shared the same nickname. These item were purchased privately by soldiers as part of their field equipment ( as, in many cases, issued items were deemed inappropriate/impractical when one’s life depended on it ).

Bottom line is: confidence and faith in one’s ‘best’ guesstimation and be prepared to be wrong.

Best,
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Old 21st January 2017, 11:45 PM   #12
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Here is another one of mine that I posted in an old thread back in 2005. This one is a M1940 Marechausseesabel, as evidenced by:
  • The typical cut out basket hilt with "shoulders"

  • The blued blade with varying thickness of edge grind
  • Bakelite grips to the hilt
  • Blackened scabbard and brass mounts
  • There are no makers' marks or armory marks on any part of the sword
According to Pupye and de Stürler Boekwijt, these swords were manufactured in the Netherlands East Indies when supplies of the M1911 Marechausseesabel were no longer available from The Netherlands. An alternative source is provided by Anuk in his post below—namely, these are unmarked Lilly Ames swords from the U.S.

Whatever may be the precise origin of these swords, the example shown fits all the criteria for a M1940 Marechaussesabel.

Also, shown below that are pictures of three swords from the same earlier thread: the M1940 Marechausseesabel, a rehilted version of an unmarked Marechausseesabel/Dutch klewang that may be Japanese work from WWII, and a dated (1922) Indonesian version of the Marechausseesabel made in Tjikeroeh and sporting a hilt of European design.

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Last edited by Ian : 30th January 2017 at 03:17 PM.
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Old 22nd January 2017, 07:09 PM   #13
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Recently, an interesting version of the marechaussee sabel appeared in an online auction. I started another thread specifically to discuss its unusual features and "royal" provenance. In the interests of compelteness of the archive for marachaussee sabels/Dutch klewangs on this site, I am posting the auction pictures again here; however, they should be viewed in conjunction with the discussion on the other thread.

[Note: In a subsequent post here, A. Maisey has suggested that this sword was assembled and etched in the Surakarta Kraton. In his view this is a genuine Surakarta Kraton sword used for ceremonial purposes.]

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Old 23rd January 2017, 04:32 AM   #14
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Default Another M1940

Another one to finish recently online is this M1940 marechaussee sabel. It was described as a M1942 Dutch klewang with the blade made by Lilly Ames. The handle scales are Bakelite and the blade shows a varying edge grind width but is unmarked. According to Puype and de Stürler Boekwijt, the unmarked M1940 versions were made in the NEI and had blackened brass fittings on the scabbard. This scabbard also lacks the two staples to secure the chape and may not be original to the sword. There appears to have been a break in the distal part of the blade that has been repaired.
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Old 30th January 2017, 04:15 AM   #15
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Default And another M1940

Typical Bakelite handle, variable edge grind, Dutch scabbard with blackened brass fittings.

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Last edited by Ian : 30th January 2017 at 05:03 PM.
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Old 30th January 2017, 02:43 PM   #16
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Default Field police

Hi Ian it is nice you like this stuf I do have an other one that came with the Uniform from the marchausse from Indie, they told me that p.v. was field police but I am not sure....


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Old 30th January 2017, 03:14 PM   #17
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Thanks Dajak. Nice M1911 example. I like that you have the field uniform jacket with all its patches and the owners medal ribbons. The shoulder patch clearly shows Marechaussee.

Perhaps Amuk can translate what PV and the numbers mean on the brass plate.

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Old 30th January 2017, 05:01 PM   #18
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Default Modified M1911 Marechausseesabel--Japanese heiho

This M1911 Marechaussee sabel has been modified during the Japanese occupation of the NEI by cutting down the blade, removing the basket hilt, and shortening the scabbard to create a heiho. This was used as a jungle knife or machete by the Japanese occupying army.

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Old 4th February 2017, 12:20 PM   #19
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Default Klewang

With an lot of marks on the scabbard.

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Old 4th February 2017, 08:30 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian
Thanks Dajak. Nice M1911 example. I like that you have the field uniform jacket with all its patches and the owners medal ribbons. The shoulder patch clearly shows Marechaussee.

Perhaps Amuk can translate what PV and the numbers mean on the brass plate.

Ian.


Hullo Ian,

P.V.= Soematera west-coast, regional police (veldpolitie)
445= weapon no.

Best,

P.S. BTW, I just noticed, on your post #15; to me the sheath looks USA-made under the Netherlands 1940 Contract (with limper leather and larger rivets) and the fittings blackened to meet USN(avy),BuOrd 10/10/41. My apologies for contradicting you.

Last edited by Amuk Murugul : 4th February 2017 at 09:21 PM. Reason: Additional info
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Old 4th February 2017, 09:48 PM   #21
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Thanks Amuk...



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Old 4th February 2017, 10:15 PM   #22
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Thank you all for this very intersting thread!


Here my Timor sword with a hembrug klewang blade: http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...highlight=timor

Last edited by Sajen : 4th February 2017 at 10:25 PM.
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