Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > European Armoury
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 17th June 2012, 11:04 AM   #1
Cerjak
Member
 
Cerjak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: FRANCE
Posts: 406
Default cannonball ?

Hi everybody,

It is a present from a friend who have found it in his garden .
The weight is 12 Kilogrammes for a diameter around 15 cm.
It seems to be made from two parts.
So I would like to know if it is a cannonball .
Regards

Cerjak
Attached Images
    
Cerjak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th June 2012, 12:30 PM   #2
adrian
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 31
Default

It is most likely a cannon ball. The mould was in two parts & where they join a seam can be seen - which is why you have what appears to be two parts joined, but in fact is one solid piece. The small circle is the part were there was an opening in the mould for molten metal to be poured in, this is usually called the "sprue", the sprue metal is ground down level with the circumference but is usually still visible, as on this example. Some balls have two sprues, opposite each other, these have come from a "gang mould" whereby more than one ball is cast from a mould.
Adrian
adrian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th June 2012, 03:28 PM   #3
fernando
Lead Moderator European Armoury
 
fernando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal
Posts: 4,646
Default

Perfectly enlightened by a cannon lover, like Adrian .
Very nice and authentic 24 pounder .
fernando is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th June 2012, 04:58 PM   #4
Matchlock
Member
 
Matchlock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Bavaria, Germany - the center of 15th and 16th century gunmaking
Posts: 4,289
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerjak
Hi everybody,

It seems to be made from two parts.

Cerjak



They, just like smaller balls for guns, were cast in molds, hence the 'seam'.

m
Matchlock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th June 2012, 05:11 PM   #5
fernando
Lead Moderator European Armoury
 
fernando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal
Posts: 4,646
Default

Here Cerjak


.
Attached Images
  
fernando is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th June 2012, 06:12 PM   #6
Cerjak
Member
 
Cerjak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: FRANCE
Posts: 406
Default

Thank you all for your good explanation.
It had be found near ARRAS ( north of France) With the weight and diameter is it possible to learn more about this cannon ball .It was used still which periode ?
Regards

Cerjak
Cerjak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th June 2012, 06:19 PM   #7
Matchlock
Member
 
Matchlock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Bavaria, Germany - the center of 15th and 16th century gunmaking
Posts: 4,289
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerjak
Thank you all for your good explanation.
It was used still which periode ?
Cerjak


Hi Cerjak,


I am no expert in 19th c. items but I guess these balls were well still in use in the Napoleonic era, early 19th c., maybe even until the middle of the century.

And 'Nando: brilliant stuff about cannonball molds!


Best,
m
Matchlock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th June 2012, 06:22 PM   #8
Atlantia
Member
 
Atlantia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: The Sharp end
Posts: 2,928
Default

What a fantastic find! Can you borrow a metal detector for next time you visit your friend?
Atlantia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th June 2012, 06:23 PM   #9
fernando
Lead Moderator European Armoury
 
fernando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal
Posts: 4,646
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerjak
... It was used still which periode ? ...

Epoque Napoleonique, probablement.

Ah Michl, cross posts.
fernando is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th June 2012, 06:26 PM   #10
fernando
Lead Moderator European Armoury
 
fernando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal
Posts: 4,646
Default

... Although i heard that Napeoleonic cannonballs had an N mark on them. Probably only some .
fernando is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th June 2012, 06:43 PM   #11
Matchlock
Member
 
Matchlock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Bavaria, Germany - the center of 15th and 16th century gunmaking
Posts: 4,289
Default

Exactly, 'Nando,


That's why I said 'Napoleonic era, early 19th c.', not confining it to the French army.

And I found a lot more interesting stuff on the site of the Canadian Anglo-Boer War Museum, backing up my theory about the period:


http://angloboerwarmuseum.com/Boer1...annonballs.html


Btw, I underwent the toil and copied everything here, so enjoy.


Your ball looks very authentic, Cerjak! I do not think it is a modern Chinese copy.


m
Attached Images
            

Last edited by Matchlock : 17th June 2012 at 08:36 PM.
Matchlock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th June 2012, 06:44 PM   #12
Matchlock
Member
 
Matchlock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Bavaria, Germany - the center of 15th and 16th century gunmaking
Posts: 4,289
Default

And the rest.
m
Attached Images
  
Matchlock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th June 2012, 07:44 PM   #13
Cerjak
Member
 
Cerjak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: FRANCE
Posts: 406
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matchlock
And the rest.
m

Michael

I was not expecting so much information.
Thank you !
Cerjak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th June 2012, 07:46 PM   #14
Matchlock
Member
 
Matchlock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Bavaria, Germany - the center of 15th and 16th century gunmaking
Posts: 4,289
Default

Neither was I, Cerjak,

But in some cases the web provides useful information.

m
Matchlock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27th August 2012, 12:05 PM   #15
cannonmn
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 152
Default

re: post no. 12 above. Those shells are 15-inch. The photo is a fairly famous one from the "Miller Series" etc., and Battery Rogers is only a few miles from where I live, am quite sure it had 15-inch guns. Another way to verify this is to look at how tiny the fuze hole looks; at the time the US had somewhat standardized fuzes.

Michael knowing your expertise in many topics I will accept for now the notion that all of the projectiles you identify as such, are in fact such, but must express some wonderment that those with considerable jagged projections, not the result of age or damage, had been accepted into service in any country. Perhaps some could be foundry rejects discovered at the site of an old furnace?

In the US from at least the early 19th C, there was an exhaustive process of casting then hammering then gageing (sp?) cannon shot to ensure their surface regularity and integrity and acceptable diameter. One gauge was actually a tube the ball had to roll down, and would not pass if oversized. Another test for each had the ball dropped from something like 20 feet onto an iron anvil to ensure it would not break easily.

I am a bit hard-pressed to believe that the US was the only country that had such high standards for shot. Many of the balls identified above as shot, I doubt would have passed in the US even as grapeshot balls.

Last edited by cannonmn : 27th August 2012 at 12:55 PM.
cannonmn is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT. The time now is 05:38 AM.


Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.