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Old 11th March 2012, 08:16 PM   #1
Dimasalang
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Default Anyone here win this one[Talibong/Garab]?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/16074924558...984.m1438.l2649

Very nice piece. Was hoping someone here grabbed it.
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Old 11th March 2012, 10:10 PM   #2
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Good news for us Talibon/Garab owners !
No one noticed the damage ?
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Old 11th March 2012, 10:26 PM   #3
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Rick, are you talking about the damage to the scabbard or the damage to the buyers wallet??? I have never seem one of these command this kind of price before.
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Old 11th March 2012, 10:54 PM   #4
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I noticed the damage to the hilt.
Didn't think it would command such a pretty penny. Good news indeed.
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Old 12th March 2012, 03:06 AM   #5
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Not great news for those of us just getting into Visayan blades


Nice piece though.
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Old 12th March 2012, 03:16 AM   #6
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Amazing how in the last 5 years prices have begun rising a lot. Or maybe that's just my impression. I guess that's good news for those sitting on large collections, and bad news for those who wish they could. But that's how things usually go when prices rise.

Talibong are nice blades... I don't see them making them like that no more

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Old 12th March 2012, 04:13 AM   #7
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Wowza, thats five times more than I'd expect! Interesting looking flaw on the blade. I've had some blades form circular cracks like that during the quench, but only a few times. I can't tell what the dark spot is? Is that just an aspect of the lighting?
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Old 12th March 2012, 04:31 AM   #8
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I would say for a very long time most people(general public) just assumed a Philippine sword was either a Moro Barong, Kris, or Kampilan. With a few Luzon regular Bolos thrown in. I believe that is now changing with the sharing of knowledge and the internet; which helps others connect, research, and document(and is all made public). And with that comes easy access of information to these weapons that most never even knew about. These Visayan weapons are an entirely whole new world. It is about time these swords get recognized for their craftsmanship as well as historical value. Realistically, anyone can go out and find a quality Barong, Kris, or Kampilan very easily. And if money is no object, you can pick and choice. I believe people are now realizing certain Visayan pieces, like the Talibong/Garab, are more rare and exclusive then the Moros weapons(even if they aren't made of higher quality materials). And this quality Talibong that sold on eBay is one of the higher end weapons to come out of the Visayan area even with the damage. You almost can not pick and choose when it comes to the Visayan area of weapons; just wait for them to appear and fight everyone else off who now wants one. The increased demand is now significantly out weighting the limited supply for Visayan weapons. There is far less supply of Visayan weapons compared to Moro weapons...and the demand is not dropping but growing. Everyone is just now realizing that. Well... thats just my take on it.
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Old 12th March 2012, 08:04 AM   #9
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I agree, and I personally feel the growing interest worldwide in Filipino Martial arts has something to do with it as well. Now you have people from around the world learning fighting styles from Luzon and Visaya and searching for the "native blades" of that style. Many start having more interest in blades considered exotic outside of PI such as the ginunting, the talibong, the pinute, the sansibar, etc. Also, as the fighting styles gain more exposure, weapon-aficionados begin learning more of the martial history of the Filipinos and the weaponry and well, you know what happens next. Of course, a lot of those people are also drawn to Moro weaponry but hey, with their charismatic history of resistance, even many Filipino martial artists like to claim their style being somehow descended from the Muslim Filipino styles..

While the price may reflect the increased demand and appreciation, ThePepperSkull makes a good point - it does make it harder for anyone to collect.
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Old 12th March 2012, 10:08 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KuKulzA28
...
Talibong are nice blades... I don't see them making them like that no more


i don't know, they still make nice blades, this one is in L6 by Jun Silva, late 20th c., also chisel ground edge. he could have spent a bit more effort on the woodwork i guess, which is not as decorative as the ebay one, but not worth $700 more... there is a site that sells some of the more exotic traditional filipino weapons at a blanket price of around $250. i covet one of their sansibars...
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Old 12th March 2012, 10:23 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kronckew
i don't know, they still make nice blades, this one is in L6 by Jun Silva, late 20th c., also chisel ground edge. he could have spent a bit more effort on the woodwork i guess, which is not as decorative as the ebay one, but not worth $700 more... there is a site that sells some of the more exotic traditional filipino weapons at a blanket price of around $250. i covet one of their sansibars...


Ok, I hear ya, I think what I meant was the ornate carving... blade quality is definitely up there. Some of the stuff that the Filipino pandays are puttin' out these days is really quality steel.

I'm a big fan of Jun Silva... he makes good blades.
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Old 12th March 2012, 03:53 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Coleman
Rick, are you talking about the damage to the scabbard or the damage to the buyers wallet??? I have never seem one of these command this kind of price before.


The scabbard, Robert .
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Old 13th March 2012, 12:52 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kronckew
i don't know, they still make nice blades, this one is in L6 by Jun Silva, late 20th c., also chisel ground edge. he could have spent a bit more effort on the woodwork i guess, which is not as decorative as the ebay one, but not worth $700 more... there is a site that sells some of the more exotic traditional filipino weapons at a blanket price of around $250. i covet one of their sansibars...


Where can I buy one?
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Old 13th March 2012, 07:53 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dimasalang
Where can I buy one?


all the ones i have seen for sale have come from visits to jun's family shop in visaya. they pop up on ebay & in other knife/sword fora on occasion. i bought mine via ebay from a man who had bought them from jun's shop. i managed to shark a talibon, 2 small garab knives, a pinute and a ginunting in separate auctions, oddly i was the only bidder for all of them, and so paid next to nothing for them. the rest of the members were asleep that week. it pays to keep your eyes open. ebay.uk sadly will no longer list knives or swords for collectors.
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Old 19th March 2012, 07:01 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Coleman
Rick, are you talking about the damage to the scabbard or the damage to the buyers wallet??? I have never seem one of these command this kind of price before.



Agree with you Robert, extreme high price! You can buy them much cheaper, see my new thread!!

Have attached the pictures from the ebay auction for later reference!

Best regards,

Detlef
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Last edited by Sajen : 19th March 2012 at 07:37 PM.
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Old 12th May 2012, 02:37 PM   #16
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Short after this one was sold another one for 800$! Really nice looking piece!
Here the link: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...cvip=true&rt=nc

And some pictures for later reference.

Regards,

Detlef
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Old 12th May 2012, 07:25 PM   #17
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looks like the rare left handed version

more common right handed one:
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Old 14th May 2012, 09:32 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sajen
Short after this one was sold another one for 800$! Really nice looking piece!
Here the link: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...cvip=true&rt=nc

And some pictures for later reference.

Regards,

Detlef


Wow what a price! Nice piece also. Do you guys think it commanded so much because it was a left hand version?

Lookin at that price, now I don't feel so bad about buying this one.

Thought I almost paid to much, but not near $800.
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Old 14th May 2012, 09:43 PM   #19
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This might sound really dumb or I might be missing a joke. I do not understand this left or right hand stuff. The chisel edge should work what ever hand it is in, what ever side of the blade is bevelled. Left handed screw driver?
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Old 14th May 2012, 10:02 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dimasalang
Wow what a price! Nice piece also. Do you guys think it commanded so much because it was a left hand version?

Lookin at that price, now I don't feel so bad about buying this one.

Thought I almost paid to much, but not near $800.



Your one is also very very nice!

I don't think that it have to do something with that it is a left hand version (the one in up reach nearly the same price) but that good old talibon/garab are sought after and that the shown examples (incl. yours) are just beautiful swords.

Here another beautiful example which was sold from a german web site and was not cheap as well.

I think that you and I am just have had good luck to get our ones as bargain.

Regards,

Detlef
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Old 15th May 2012, 01:12 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Simmons
This might sound really dumb or I might be missing a joke. I do not understand this left or right hand stuff. The chisel edge should work what ever hand it is in, what ever side of the blade is bevelled. Left handed screw driver?


Hi Tim, if you look at the scabbard itself, it would also tell you if it is a right hand or left hand sword...as the scabbard can only be worn on the right side or left side(it can't be both). For instance, the one I own and posted a picture of...it can not be worn on the right hip(left hand draw), or else it would be upside down if done in that manner. The chiseled edge and carvings on the handle(which would show front side and rear side) follows this format.
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Old 15th May 2012, 01:18 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sajen
Your one is also very very nice!

I don't think that it have to do something with that it is a left hand version (the one in up reach nearly the same price) but that good old talibon/garab are sought after and that the shown examples (incl. yours) are just beautiful swords.

Here another beautiful example which was sold from a german web site and was not cheap as well.

I think that you and I am just have had good luck to get our ones as bargain.

Regards,

Detlef


Thanks. I mentioned before, it is nice to see these Visayan weapons finally getting some recognition, as I do believe the originals are more rare than Moro weapons, and are crafted just as well. BUT, I just wished I got in to this collecting game sooner, as I feel I don't have enough fine examples, and now the prices are going through the roof.


I don't think I ever looked in to what the shape of the handle represents. Is it a bulb? Now I am curious. I just have to add also, that when I grasp mine in my hand, it actually feels awkward, since the pointed downward edge of the wooden handle pokes against the meat of my thumb on my palm. The whole ergonomics of the sword and the canted edge would make you think there was a lot of thought that gone in to this sword to make it as natural feeling as possible. But that very pointy wooden handle against my palm...Can't image how they could fight like that with it being in the way. It does feel unnatural...or am I missing something here?
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Old 15th May 2012, 04:50 AM   #23
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JUDGING FROM THE SHAPE OF THE HANDLES AND ESPECIALLY THE SCABBARD TIP THESE MUST COME FROM THE SAME REGION OR TRIBE. WHICH ISLAND DO YOU GUYS THINK THEY COME FROM? I WILL MAKE A WILD GUESS SAMAR OR POSSIBLY CEBU AREA.
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Old 15th May 2012, 05:39 AM   #24
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in the 'hidden cities' series in history channel asia, the host [anthony morse] explains why the right-handed iban headhunter has to be equipped with a right-side beveled chisel-ground sword -- in this first screen capture, morse was saying:

" [the Iban's (Borneo) sword] is designed to separate, or cut off the head. Now you can't really see it on the camera, but this particular blade, there is a slight curvature on the top or outer part. And on the back side, it's complete flat. This sword was designed specifically for a warrior who is right-handed "
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Old 15th May 2012, 05:40 AM   #25
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" Now let's say I was a right-handed warrior, if I were coming to cut off his head, as I approach the neck, because of the curve in the outer side of the blade, as soon as I make contact, it would kind of swipe across, and then go upwards, ensuring a very clean cut."
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Old 15th May 2012, 05:41 AM   #26
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"Now if I were to use the same blade as a left-hander, what would happen is I would cut. And instead of going upward, the blade would actually go downwards. And then that would just not be good. Because then you would have a head that's still semi-attached to the body. And that would just not cut it, for building your reputation as a fierce headhunter."
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Old 15th May 2012, 05:44 AM   #27
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Click here to watch that short video.

So what do you guys think? Does Morse make sense, and was there something written or reported before, about the logic being explained by Morse? Thanks.
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Old 15th May 2012, 06:21 AM   #28
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on a less macabre note, this website explains why in certain situations, a chisel-ground blade makes more sense ...
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Old 15th May 2012, 07:19 AM   #29
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i did mean to hilite in my earlier post that sajen's original posted photo was likely 'flipped' digitally somewhere in either epray or elsewhen. my post above was the original poster's photo re-flipped to turn it back into a right-hander, which i assumed it really is.

i'm glad the topic of left/right handers was thus discussed as it is important in these eastern weapons (and sushi knives - i do in fact own a nice laminated japanese sushi knife, right handed of course. ).

i like miguel's posting just above, especially the very last sentence in the attachment starting 'finally'. after all, these were initially farm tools & only incidentally later weapons. a clean cut on a bush precedes but does negate a clean cut on a neck.
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Old 15th May 2012, 08:52 AM   #30
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Default This forum help increase garab prices

When prices of previously ignored items start to move up, nicer specimens begin turning up in the market. I think that's what is going on in the case of garabs. Info on this forum has also contributed in raising the prices. I recently acquired two fine garabs with dates on the scabbard. I was familiar with the existence of dated garabs because of previous posts in this form, so when this pair was offered, I did not hesitate.
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