Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > Ethnographic Weapons
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 8th November 2005, 05:11 PM   #1
Ki Jayamalelo
Member
 
Ki Jayamalelo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Germany
Posts: 18
Default For Kerislovers

You may have a look to:

http://www.museumkennis.nl/asp/page...nnis&id=i000024

Some important Kerisses from Dutch Musea. Search for KRIS.

Ki Jaya
Ki Jayamalelo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th November 2005, 01:03 AM   #2
Battara
EAAF Staff
 
Battara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 5,720
Default

Vielen dank, mein freund. Diese krisen sind shone (das tut mir leid, mein vortshaft ist nichts besonders gut ).

I especially like the state kris that is featured also in "Traditional Weapons of the Indonesian Archipelago" and one other kris that I think is dressed in swaasa that is featured in another book on keris.

Again, thank you for the link. I am a little surprised that they use "kris" instead of "keris".
Battara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th November 2005, 08:22 AM   #3
kai
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,886
Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by Battara
I am a little surprised that they use "kris" instead of "keris".

That's just the Dutch common name which stuck with these blades. You know that the early seafaring accounts use many different transliterations/corruptions of the local names and the spelling "kris" seems to have been adopted in several European languages, at least during the later parts of the colonial period.

Regards,
Kai
kai is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th November 2005, 01:41 PM   #4
Henk
Member
 
Henk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 1,172
Default

In the dutch musea are very nice keris present.

Battara and Kai, It is very simple that we use the word kris instead of keris. When you speak the word keris quickly and not very clear a dutch (and probably not only a dutch) will hear the word keris as kris. In many old dutch book about keris, keris is written as kris. It is very likely the authors heared the word kris and nobody made a correction. When you ask a dutch about kris a lot of them will refer to the Indonesian dagger. When you ask for keris a lot of us will look at you with incomprehension.
Henk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th November 2005, 03:53 PM   #5
BluErf
Member
 
BluErf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Singapore
Posts: 1,178
Default

Don't seem to see anything when I click on the link. Can't read Dutch too.
BluErf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th November 2005, 04:14 PM   #6
Alam Shah
Member
 
Alam Shah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Singapore
Posts: 1,248
Default Free translation service...

Blu,

When you see the underscores, type 'kris' and click 'Zeok'.
You'll get a list of related hits...enjoy...

For translations, I copy and paste the text
using Altavista Babel Fish Translations.
It's not perfect but can give an outline of what it means...
http://world.altavista.com/

Of course there are other such as SDL International
Free text translator.
http://www.freetranslation.com/
Alam Shah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th November 2005, 06:02 PM   #7
simatua
Member
 
simatua's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 69
Default another webside

Dear kerislovers,

The webside first mentioned contains photo's and decription from the database
from the "rijksmuseum Volkenkunde"

The database contains over 900 photo's from kerises( with or without text)
look at www.rmv.nl
I am sorry for people cannot read Dutch, because you have to make a choice
in the Home page Nederlands ===> collectie ===> database ===> zelf zoeken (=selfsearch) : KRIS ( not keris).

The Englisch part does not contain all the photo's.

For those who cannot read Dutch: Another language ( like German,Indonesian etc) never kept me away from study and learning from photo's

simatua is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th November 2005, 12:32 AM   #8
rahman
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Singapore
Posts: 84
Default

Quote:
I am a little surprised that they use "kris" instead of "keris".

Actually, when you read 19th and early 20th century English/British works the term "creese" was used. People got "creesed" in those days.
rahman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th November 2005, 04:01 AM   #9
nechesh
Member
 
nechesh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 940
Default

Ki and Martin, thanks for the links. Even not knowing Dutch i managed to stumble my way into both data bases. The first link is interesting due to the fact that many are state keris. It is also interesting to note that except for the so called Wllem IV keris all the others weren't collected until the late 19th or early 20th centuries. It is a shame that the site isn't properly managed so that the photos open up at a higher resolution. I can see some of these are very nice keris, but the pixelation makes it very difficult to make much use of them for any serious study.
I'm afraid i found Martin's link even more dissapointing. These are some really bad photos. Most of what i viewed were fairly common piece, many in rust and disrepair, though i must admit i gave up after a few pages. Even so, most of the photos i saw show very bad angles that barely show the blade, some are actually out of focus and these pics also open up badly pixelated. You would think that major museums would domore professional work.
nechesh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th November 2005, 08:06 AM   #10
kai
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,886
Red face

Quote:
Originally Posted by nechesh
It is a shame that the site isn't properly managed so that the photos open up at a higher resolution.

Hi Nechesh, clicking on the thumbs worked for me. Pics are about 100-300 KB.


Quote:
I'm afraid i found Martin's link even more dissapointing.

I was also going to give that NMV link, too. However, it really is a shame that many (most IIRC) pieces are without even the basic data (that hasn't changed for years AFAIK). Thumbs are minute and often the blade is sheathed but there are a few interesting tidbits. I haven't checked more popular parts of the collection in the database to see wether they are better managed but I'm afraid that funds are just too limited in most Musea to spend anything on side-projects which don't increase visitor statistics...

Regards,
Kai
kai is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th November 2005, 01:44 PM   #11
Ki Jayamalelo
Member
 
Ki Jayamalelo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Germany
Posts: 18
Default

Hi Kerislovers,

and here some more but important kerisses from the 17. cent. of the National Museum Danmark.

http://www.kunstkammer.dk/Ostindisk...keGB.asp?ID=203

http://www.kunstkammer.dk/Ostindisk...keGB.asp?ID=223

http://www.kunstkammer.dk/Ostindisk...keGB.asp?ID=224



Ki Jaya
Ki Jayamalelo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th November 2005, 02:57 PM   #12
BluErf
Member
 
BluErf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Singapore
Posts: 1,178
Default

Oh wow! 2 of the kerises in Karsten Jensen's book, and in colour! Plus the beautiful kerises from the Dutch Musea. Its really a lot of eye candy!

Thanks to Ki Jayamalelo for sharing!
BluErf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th November 2005, 03:52 PM   #13
nechesh
Member
 
nechesh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 940
Default

Thanks Ki. Those were certainly nice to see! They are also much better photographs and managed properly so they don't pixelate. Too bad they don't provide close-ups as well. Beautiful old keris, especially that last one.
Kai, i have no problem opening the thumb nails, but these photos weren't sized properly so that when they open they are digitally too big for their size. This causes pixelation of the image with great loss of detail . This is why the images look all grainy or pebbly. They open full screen but the fine details are lost. This is what i mean by poorly managed. I would have hoped that a major museum would have a better grasp of the technology involved in order to present these photos in the most informative manner.
nechesh is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT. The time now is 05:20 AM.


Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.