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Old 3rd June 2010, 08:12 PM   #1
CharlesS
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Default A Very Hefty Parang Lotok

This is the most heavy parang lotok I have ever handled....to the point of being downright uncomfortable to weld. It is a beautiful example with nice, crisp lines. The hilt is horn with a decorated silver sleeve. The fact that the forte is nearly a full inch thick speaks volumes regarding its heft!!
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Old 6th June 2010, 06:50 PM   #2
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Charles,

This is very nice.

I am most upset that you find it uncomfortable to handle. To alleviate the discomfort I suggest you send it straight to me

Regards

Roy
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Old 6th June 2010, 07:40 PM   #3
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A wonderfull piece!

I like thick blades, cause they will do their duty for what they are made for.
I also like the beautifull silverwork and scabbard.

Maurice
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Old 7th June 2010, 12:20 AM   #4
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Is this the one you got at Timonium?

Yes I too love the silver work.
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Old 7th June 2010, 10:25 AM   #5
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Charles

Were these combat weapons or just used for removing heads? They seem a bit awkward to use?

Lew
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Old 7th June 2010, 01:41 PM   #6
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Yes Battara, it's the one from Timonium.

Lew, my impression from Stone(though I do not have a copy with me at the moment) is that these are as much utilitarian as exclusively weapons.

I don't think I have ever seen an old photo with a Dayak carring either one of these or a parang pandit....would love to see them in some old photos.
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Old 7th June 2010, 04:27 PM   #7
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Charles

Shelford claims that these were largely for agricultural use.
This one must have been for a very rich farmer!

I have never seen one been carried or used in any of the old photos either.

Regards
Roy
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Old 7th June 2010, 09:42 PM   #8
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Here is a picture from Mjoeberg / Borneo that I just sold on the swap.
The 2nd from the left is carrying a parang latok imho.

Also intersting the 2 guys on the right are carying very rare betelnut/sirih knifes.
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Old 9th June 2010, 01:06 PM   #9
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A great pic...the first I have seen that even suggested a latok or pandit type.
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Old 9th June 2010, 03:34 PM   #10
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Your latok is probably Melanau, not Land dayak, based on the blade thickness, silver, motifs etc.
Here is another picture with what looks more like a buko.

Michael

PS I don't understand why the picture gets turned when I upload it?
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Old 9th June 2010, 05:17 PM   #11
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Hope it works!
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Old 14th August 2011, 09:12 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlesS

I don't think I have ever seen an old photo with a Dayak carring either one of these or a parang pandit....would love to see them in some old photos.
Charles, I recently found this fine image!
It looks like the same guy/boy in the photo that Michael showed earlier.
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Old 14th August 2011, 10:10 PM   #13
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Great picture Maurice! Still trying to figure out how they wielded the parang latok.
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Old 15th August 2011, 05:22 AM   #14
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I think you use it similarly to any type of long blade that has a backwards curve. The way the latok bends back is similar to how sabers and parangs tend to curve backwards, making a saber cut or a draw cut (or whatever) much easier to do. As the blade comes down, the geometry of it makes it easy to slide the blade edge at the same time. Thus proper form makes for a strike that has the percussion and momentum of the chop, and the sliding-through affect of the slice. Makes for a really wicked slash/cut. However, it is interesting that the Parang Latok seems so crudely built for this purpose, rather than curving to help achieve an excellent slicing geometry, it is simply bent back - like the Parang Pendat. It must be a little awkward to chop at something low to the ground (unless you adapt your posture and handling to the unique character of the Latok)...

Maybe it is also safer in some ways because of the longer blunt area just beyond the handle offers more room for your hand when doing precision chopping and the bend makes it harder for your hand to slip right onto the blade (unlike many other machetes and parangs). Also, because of the bend back, maybe it is also safer because it is harder to chop your own leg! You have no idea, I've had at least 3 or 4 close calls when out in the forest with a parang, golok, or machete and ALMOST chopping into my leg. Using such efficient tools/weapons is an exercise in focus.



They still use this style today... I saw these pictures on a website (not sure if I am allowed to link to it... ?) But yeah, the website/owner gets the credit. Just google "bidayuh cutting tools in semban" and you'll find the website.
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Old 17th May 2014, 06:36 AM   #15
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Default The basket he carried.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maurice
Charles, I recently found this fine image!
It looks like the same guy/boy in the photo that Michael showed earlier.



That is a Land dayak (bidayuh) Basket.
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Old 17th May 2014, 06:43 AM   #16
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Default On #12 , The basket the boy carried.

That is for sure a Land Dayak (Bidayuh) Basket he is carrying.
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Old 17th May 2014, 01:41 PM   #17
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Wonderful piece ; I like big chopping type blades.This sword is much too ornate for farm work ; also if one is swinging a farm implement all day long, they try to make the tool lighter, not heavier, as the 1 " thickness at the spine would indicate to the contrary .I think this sword belonged to an important man.
In regards to the shape of the weapon, could it originally have been designed to administer justice in the old "Sumerian code,if you steal, you lose a hand ?" The angle seems perfect for severing a prone,outstretched limb.The Germans of Old had "Justice Swords," for such purposes.
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Old 17th May 2014, 07:11 PM   #18
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I have always liked thick blades .................jimmy
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Old 18th May 2014, 04:00 AM   #19
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Could this have possibly been used for slaughtering purposes at festivals or other important gatherings? One good swing with this I imagine would remove the head of a water buffalo quite effectively. My congratulations to you Charles, wonderful workmanship and still retaining the original scabbard, this is an absolutely stunning piece.

Best,
Robert
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Old 18th May 2014, 05:22 AM   #20
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I HAVE ALWAYS LIKED THESE LARGE HEAVY EXAMPLES THEY KIND REMIND ME OF THE DAYAK VERSION OF THE MORO PANABAS AND MAY HAVE SERVED THE SAME PURPOSES. CONGRADULATIONS ON A TOP QUALITY EXAMPLE OF THE LARGE HEAVY FORM.
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