Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > Ethnographic Weapons
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 6th January 2009, 05:51 AM   #31
Andrew
Vikingsword Staff
 
Andrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 1,725
Default

We don't need any detailed episiotomy discussion here, thanks.

Let's get back on topic, shall we?
Andrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6th January 2009, 03:03 PM   #32
celtan
Member
 
celtan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: PR, USA
Posts: 679
Default

Sometime? Always!

I have successfully faced blades and firearms, yet have learned that the only predictably successful way of defense against feminine weapons is to run away like a scared rabbit.

I mean, unless you choose to be "attacked", or are frozen in place by the headlights...


. " )



Quote:
Originally Posted by migueldiaz
Sometimes, the woman's greatest "weapon" is intangible and subtle ...
Attached Images
 
celtan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6th January 2009, 03:34 PM   #33
celtan
Member
 
celtan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: PR, USA
Posts: 679
Default

I have shot the Spanish M 1752 fusil, very similar to the M 1728, and it is reasonably accurate and reliable.

Most probably they didn't even shoot at her, the spanish are inured from birth to women shouting abuse at us, throwing dishes etc...It's almost a church-sanctioned way of showing affection...

I still remember the beating I got in Galicia when I was 10 yrs. old, from a 11 yo blonde, blue eyed celtic she-devil, just out of a whim...

In WWII, a couple of my grand-uncles served in the Wehrmacht in Russia. They were supplied methamphetamine-laced chocolate while at the frontline, which made them alert, aggressive and "roaring to go"...

M



Quote:
Originally Posted by migueldiaz
That's an interesting photo, Jeff.

I wonder what the message of the symbolisms are -- we have a young lady who seems to be lactating mother, and who is either pregnant again or had just delivered one, and then she's holding that ceremonial sword.

Moving to another location, here's an account describing an Igorot "amazon priestess":
"On the 25th [June 1747], Don Cuarto began the attack, but was soon put out of action himself by two rocks which struck him in the head. Apparently directing the defense forces was a sort of amazon priestess in their midst, naked to the waist, who kept inciting the Ipituys to fever pitch with her shouts and taunting the enemy with her invective and challenging them to shoot her, and although she was a frequent target, no ball found its mark -- a circumstance analyzed in the friar report of the battle as a sure sign of direct covenant with the Devil. The Igorots fought with such fury and war cries they literally foamed at the mouth, causing their enemies to suspect they had chewed some narcotic root to provide a suicidal intoxication."
The account was taken from WH Scott's The Discovery of the Igorots: Spanish Contacts with the Pagans of Northern Luzon (1974).
celtan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th July 2011, 03:09 AM   #34
Gavin Nugent
Member
 
Gavin Nugent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,407
Default Back from the depths

I couldn't help but raise this ole thread again after reading these links this morning;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomyris

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nine_W...Female_Worthies

Enjoy the read.

Gav
Gavin Nugent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th July 2011, 03:23 AM   #35
laEspadaAncha
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 608
Default

Long live the necroposter! Thanks for dredging the forum to find this one, Gav... The thread might be two and a half years old, but it's new to me.

Anyway, as I didn't see this she-biscuit mentioned elsewhere in the thread, here is my wife's own "historical heroine," if you will, Jhansi Ki Rani:


laEspadaAncha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th July 2011, 04:19 AM   #36
aiontay
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 88
Default

Even today Kiowa women, when dressed in traditional dress, have a knife sheath on their belt. These days the sheath is empty as often as not, but back in the old days it wasn't. Knives obviously were mainly tools, but women also carried them for defense, and sometimes offense as well. If a grandmother thought her grand daughter was being mistreated by her husband, he might end up getting cut by his wife's grandmother.
aiontay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th July 2011, 01:17 PM   #37
tom hyle
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Houston, TX, USA
Posts: 1,254
Default

3. Woman's knife. Blade curved, designed for striking a slanting blow. Bagobo, southeastern Mindanao ..."[/I][/QUOTE]

This appears to be a cane-splitting knife; a typical work knife often associated with women.
tom hyle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th July 2011, 01:22 PM   #38
tom hyle
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Houston, TX, USA
Posts: 1,254
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Luc LEFEBVRE
Somes pics of african (Congo) women or young girls with knives, in ceremonial use.
Luc

Is that a tiny mambele with a disc on its tip? It certainly looks like one? although the disc seems all-white and could be a trick reflection....
tom hyle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th July 2011, 12:31 PM   #39
Atlantia
Member
 
Atlantia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: The Sharp end
Posts: 2,928
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by aiontay
Even today Kiowa women, when dressed in traditional dress, have a knife sheath on their belt. These days the sheath is empty as often as not, but back in the old days it wasn't. Knives obviously were mainly tools, but women also carried them for defense, and sometimes offense as well. If a grandmother thought her grand daughter was being mistreated by her husband, he might end up getting cut by his wife's grandmother.



I think that's an interesting point.
There is a HUGE cultural gulf in the attitudes towards knives and weapons use by women.

I've never met an English girl who had anything more than a passing appreciation of edged weapons and most don't like them at all.
As my lovely mrs occasionally reminds me "it's a boy thing really".

By contrast.... (and I know a single example is hardly a fair sample) a friend of mine is originally from the Phillipines and whenever her and her other half come over for a visit, she is absolutely enthralled by my weapons collection.
She loves small daggers and conealable weapons, she likes swords and happily inspects any new additons with a definate glint in her eye (making her partner most uncomfortable!).
She gleefully regales us with tales of her years in Manilla and the different knives she carried, her favourite sword that she kept in the bar she owned, how she would chase trouble makers out with it etc.
She's quite a character!

Doesn't seem too familiar with the diverse Phillipine types and isn't any help in identifications.
But a completely different view on weapons from western gal's for sure!

Gene

P.S.
Things my other half says on the subject of my weapons:
When I show her a new acquisition:

"I don't want to hold it, it looks dirty"

*sniff* "I don't want to touch it, it'll make my hands smell like pennies"


(on the subject of a new Kukri) "hmm, you've seen one, you've kind of seen them all haven't you?"

Last edited by Atlantia : 16th July 2011 at 12:45 PM.
Atlantia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th July 2011, 01:19 PM   #40
Berkley
Member
 
Berkley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Austin, Texas USA
Posts: 257
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Atlantia
There is a HUGE cultural gulf in the attitudes towards knives and weapons use by women....
Things my other half says on the subject of my weapons:
(on the subject of a new Kukri) "hmm, you've seen one, you've kind of seen them all haven't you?"

This is not a bad thing. It means that once the number of specimens in your collection reaches "critical mass", all new acquisitions become de facto invisible. Domestic harmony is the happy result.
Berkley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18th July 2011, 06:43 AM   #41
mohd
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 41
Default

Cut Nyak Dhien Of Aceh (i.e. "Cut" in Malay sounds like "chute" in English).
Click HERE to read about Cut Nyak Dhien.



mohd
mohd is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT. The time now is 12:40 PM.


Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.