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Old 25th June 2007, 05:09 PM   #1
katana
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Default Indian Beheading sword axe, just finished on eBay

Not so certain whether this a 'genuine' execution sword.
Seems to have a Nepalese look about it, blade seems to have laminations and forging flaws.
Certainly has the dimensions and characteristics of this type of sword,
two handled hilt etc. I noticed a respected member of this Forum also bid ....I wondered what others have to say about it.

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI....:MEWA:IT&ih=018
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Old 25th June 2007, 05:38 PM   #2
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Its a Ram Dao used for beheading goats & buffalos.

Occur in Nepal, Common in Bengal.

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Old 25th June 2007, 06:04 PM   #3
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Thanks Spiral.....I suspected it was a form of Ram Dao, but I thought they tended to be 'shorter' and more ornate. Beheading animals....was this done just as a form of 'slaughter' (for food) or was this ceremonial ?
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Old 26th June 2007, 12:36 AM   #4
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They were used for ceremonial purposes and often the eye on these symbolized Durga on the big ones who slayed the bull. She is a consort of Shiva. This particular one is for beheading things like doves. They come in various sizes. Origins? - Nepal for the most part.
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Old 26th June 2007, 08:48 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katana
Thanks Spiral.....I suspected it was a form of Ram Dao, but I thought they tended to be 'shorter' and more ornate. Beheading animals....was this done just as a form of 'slaughter' (for food) or was this ceremonial ?


In the Hindu religion all animals killed should be cleany beheaded, rather than throat cut or shot.

So the short answer is Both. All death should be cerimonial. Thats the respect for what you kill.

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Old 26th June 2007, 10:01 PM   #6
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Thank you Spiral, that is why they are so heavy for the job - they need to do the job in one swing. As far as the sacrifice is concerned, they get liberated.
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Old 27th June 2007, 02:57 PM   #7
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Thankyou Spiral and Battara,
I was unaware that the Hindu religion necitated the beheading of animals as the only method of slaughter. Thank you, another piece of information learned

Regards David
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Old 27th June 2007, 03:07 PM   #8
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In India, in the early days, the young noblemen trained on wet clay, till they were sure that they could behead an ox in one stroke Ė anything else would be a disaster for the family and spoil the feast, being a bad omen.
In Nepal, many years ago, I have seen an offering, where the priest cut the throad of the birds, sprinkeled some blood on the alter, and gave the animal back to the ovner to take home to eat - after he had gotten paid, of course.
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Old 27th June 2007, 04:43 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jens Nordlunde
In Nepal, many years ago, I have seen an offering, where the priest cut the throad of the birds, sprinkeled some blood on the alter, and gave the animal back to the ovner to take home to eat - after he had gotten paid, of course.



Guess that shows not all Hindus are good Hindus, same as Christians, & same as priests & vicars.

What tribe was the priest from?

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Old 27th June 2007, 06:19 PM   #10
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I really donít know which tribe it was, as it was more than forty years ago, before I got interested in collecting. I do however still remember that he cut/beheaded the birds, getting the money in his blood stained hand, trying to shake the coins into his pocket. It is really strange, that memories like this can stay with you for decades without fading. I also remember the National Museum, which I found a disaster. You showed us a number of pictures some time ago.
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Old 28th June 2007, 01:10 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spiral
In the Hindu religion all animals killed should be cleany beheaded, rather than throat cut or shot.

So the short answer is Both. All death should be cerimonial. Thats the respect for what you kill.

Spiral


Though at least in some of the Hindu ritual texts, it is prescribed that the animals sacrificed be strangled or smothered to death -- so that the death is bloodless.

But in practice, I have only see the beheading method.
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Old 28th June 2007, 10:35 AM   #12
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Thanks for the correction Beo.

Jens, yes the museam is rather amauratish, but at least they still have many great speicimiens. I thouroughly enjyed spending 2 days in it. Next time I go i will visit it again.

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