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Old 8th May 2015, 12:30 PM   #151
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by E.B. Erickson
Ibrahim,
That's not a statement of mine that you mentioned a few posts up the page, but I don't remember right now who said it! I guess I'll have to head over to MyArmoury and track it down. And anyway, I'm just a collector, and would hardly consider myself a leading light of baskethilt lore.

I am, however, in total agreement with the idea that the various basket types developed independently of each other. This idea was also expressed by Jasper.
One thing that I have been doing the last week or so is developing a visual lineage of the various basket types. I'll post it when I have a rough draft that I'm happy with.

Regarding those baskets with the slotted elements, one turned up in Virginia, apparently from an early colonial site, but unfortunately the site itself and information about it is lost. See the attached photo.


Salaams E.B. Erickson, Please see http://jamesdjulia.com/item/lot-231...virginia-44160/ where there are 3 weapons discovered of which your illustration is one. The site is an old auction site 2011 therefor the items were probably sold 4 or 5 years back....

My apologies on the quote which I only meant I had applied from the website which had mentioned your name....rather than you having been the originator of the words I showed...

Excellent news that you are working on the lineage document.

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.

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Old 9th May 2015, 03:41 AM   #152
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Ibrahim,
Yes, that old Julia auction is where I found the sword. The other two items weren't surprising to find in an American colonial context, but that Germanic/Dutch basket was! I guess it shouldn't have been too much of a surprise, because England and Europe had a lot of trade going on in the 1600s (when they weren't fighting each other!).

No need to apologize for the confusion about the quotation. Whoever said that is a much better writer than I am, and I just wanted to make sure that I didn't get the credit.

--ElJay
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Old 9th May 2015, 12:49 PM   #153
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Quote:
Originally Posted by E.B. Erickson
First, glad to see photos of the blade on Mark's sword, even though it negated my prediction that it would have a narrow and wide fuller!

Second, please see the attached photos.This went through eBay several years ago, and was advertised as being a Dutch baskethilt. Can any of you that have access to European museums verify this? The pommel does not appear to be original. The photos of a page from a book were included as aprt of the auction description.


From the National Museum Copenhagen Denmark, Danish, Dutch , north European ?
Kind regards
Ulfberth
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Old 10th May 2015, 09:26 AM   #154
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Default Glasgow Scottish Basket Hilted Backsword

Hi Guys

As I mentioned, Rex and I went to Melbourne for an Arms and Armour Auction last weekend. Apart from a number of nice Georgian swords I had targeted an early Basket hilt which I was fortunate enough to secure. The hilt is reasonably early, probably around 1707, however the blade marked with a Fox with a H over the forelegs is probably latter.

This brings me back to the old question which Harvey used just the H over the forelegs on the familiar fox marking. I have seen plenty with SH for Samuel Harvey and have begun to wonder it the absence of the S represents an earlier Harvey such as Joseph.

Glasgow Scottish Basket Hilted Backsword
Date: Hilt Circa 1707, blade may be latter
Maker/Retailer: Blade made by Harvey
Overall Length: 39 1/4” 99.7 cm fuller 24 3/8” 62 cm
Blade length: 33” 84 cm
Blade widest point: 1 ½” 3.7 cm
Hilt widest point: 4 ½” 11.2 cm
Inside grip length: 4 ¼” 10.7 cm
Marks, etc.: Stamped with a fox with H over the forelegs.

Description
Glasgow hilt with Cone shaped Pommel, Shields and Guards have bracket cut with central lobes to the edge, Shield and Guard piercings include darts mounted by two circles, other circles and engraved lines. The two shields are pierced by a central star of four points, surrounded by darts mounted by two circles. There is no wrist guard or horseman’s ring. The grip is wood with brass wire. The backsword blade is stamped with a fox with H over the forelegs.

General Remarks
No Horseman’s ring in the guard

References:
MAZANSKY (C.) BRITISH BASKET-HILTED SWORDS: A TYPOLOGY OF BASKET-TYPE SWORD HILTS pp102 F5c, 109 F13b, 113 F15

Cheers Cathey and Rex
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Old 11th May 2015, 01:14 AM   #155
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Another outstanding sword!

Most interesting that the indeed old question of the SH running wolf (fox) on these Harvey blades comes up. This discussion has gone on for many years now, and interesting situation that there were three Samuel Harvey's, senior b. 1698; his son Jr. and grandson III. The grandson died in 1810.

I had actually never heard of a Joseph, so curious as to where he would fall into the range of this dynasty.

It seems there was no particular chronology or documented evidence of these marks used by the Harvey's at a particular time. I recall having one of the horsemans swords with HARVEY in blocks letters across the forte many years ago.
Some blades are marked S HARVEY without the fox; on a slotted guard hilt c. 1780 the blade is stamped H/VEY below a crown.

One of these swords in Neumann (19.S) has a blade c.1750-68 with this same fox and letter H only. This seems the correct period for this blade which as indicated post dates the hilt.

I have always wondered what prompted the Harvey's to adopt the well known 'running wolf' of the expatriate Solingen smiths in England from Hounslow and Shotley Bridge, and when this occurred. It is curious as these were not used exclusively in either of these German 'arrangements', and the use of the mark in Solingen had expired during these times as well.
As far as I know no other English maker ever used the 'fox', and the inclination of its use seems inconsistent with the Harvey's.

It seems Eljay had come up with similar findings some years ago.
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Old 11th May 2015, 04:21 AM   #156
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Default Harveys

Hi Jim

Actually there are quite a few Harveys, according to my data base as follows:
Harvey, George: 1777 – 1780 21 Park St
Harvey, John: 1630 - 1645
Harvey, John: 1849 – 1854 40 High St, Deritend
Harvey, John: 1855 - Albert Works, Glover St
Harvey, John: 1860 - 27 Adderley St
Harvey, John: 1865 – 1882 123 Steelbouse Lane
Harvey, John: 1883 – 1897 Coleshill St
Harvey, Joseph: 1800 – 1814 16 Upper Priory
Harvey, Joseph: 1815 – 1820 Park St
Harvey, Mary: 1847 - High St, Deritend
Harvey, William: 1816 – 1820 High St

There is even a Mary for a short time. The earliest Harvey appears to be a John Harvey, but as you say I can find no records of when or who used what version of the fox. I guess we will never know unless we can accuratley date some blades, but as Baskets often had there blades updated, this is not much help either.

Cheers Cathey and Rex
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Old 11th May 2015, 06:33 AM   #157
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Thanks Cathey, very impressive genealogical grouping, and it of course makes sense that the family would have had other members. I used only Annis & May and Southwick which focus only on the recorded smiths I believe but I don't have them handy to recheck.
It does seem that the others listed here, and were of course smiths, fall outside the scope of the blade form, George was possible I suppose..but John in the 17th c. too early.

With John it is tempting to think that perhaps he had some dealings with the German smiths at Hounslow, and brought the running wolf notion into the family blades but this can only be a most tenuous supposition.

It does remain tempting to think that George might have left out the S, but seems odd as the Samuels were still at it concurrently. As Samuel Jr. died in 1778 during George's time of activity that is tempting thought.

I guess we will have to concede to there being notable variations in the Harvey's marks and rely on blade character for estimates.
It was apparently common for officers in Scottish regiments to use heirloom blades or for that matter hilts at their disgression so these kinds of pairings not unusual.

Wonderful swords!! Keep them coming please!

Best regards,
Jim
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Old 11th May 2015, 12:39 PM   #158
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Salaams All, I wonder if I can cut across several posts here and introduce the following article on Basket Hilts which as an introduction I Quote" With Open "S" Paneled Guards
Anthony D. Darling
The two swords illustrated and discussed in this
paper are of particular importance to students and
collectors of 18th century British military edged
weapons, primarily those in use prior to the first regulation
patterns of 1788.' One (1 A), having a brass
hilt, is a cavalry sword while the other (IB), with steel
hilt, is the weapon of an infantryman. Contemporary
pictorial evidence indicates that the latter was in use
as early as 1742 and, as the former's guard configuration
resembles its infantry counterpart so closely,
we can safely assume that both swords date from this
period. What is strange is that so fragile a metal as
brass would have been used for the hilt of a mounted
man's sword, his primary weapon, whereas swords
were rarely used by infantry, and, if so, only as a last
resort. In fact, swords were abolished for infantry
privates save for grenadier^,^ Highlanders and drummers
in 176€L3 Records indicate that many infantry
regiments had in fact stopped wearing swords during
the Seven Years' War (1756-1763).4
Infantry Sword
This sword, or "hanger," has a slightly curved,
single-edged 28-inch blade with one narrow fuller.
The blade is stamped with the remains of a "running
fox" mark which may indicate the work of the Birmingham
sword cutler, Samuel Ha r v e y....."
Unquote. For the entire document I reccommend http://americansocietyofarmscollect...049_Darling.pdf

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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Old 11th May 2015, 02:25 PM   #159
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Salaams....and heres another thing ! I didnt know that Mazanskys work was on the web ..free...and it is essential reading...please see the slightly incomplete but hugely informative work which goes in for Typology of this enormously morphed style of sword...This work certainly helps the reader balance the various weapons. Please see https://books.google.com.om/books?i...oration&f=false

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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Old 16th May 2015, 07:44 AM   #160
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Default Scottish Basket Hilt by Thomas Gemmill

Hi Guys

Just working through what I have and haven’t posted and realised I had not put my favourite up yet, so here goes.

Scottish Basket Hilt by Thomas Gemmill
Date: Circa 1690-1720 (17-18th Century)
Nationality: Scottish (Glasgow)
Overall Length: 93.5 cm (36.8 inches)
Blade length: 79.7 cm (31.4 inches)
Blade widest point: 4.4 cm (1.7 inches)
Marks, etc: Blade marked "Andria Farara" in the centre.

Description
The Iron hilt has a broad flared wrist guard with fluted decoration. The edges of all the broad and narrow guards are cut with pairs of claws with bifurcated ends. The piercing includes hearts made up of three separate holes, a diamond one shaped to fit between the other two which are round. The central piercing on the broad guards is in the form of an X. The grip is stag horn. All other bars are broad and have deep fluted decoration. This is a full basket. The broad sword blade is marked “"Andria Farara" on both sides.

General Remarks
Provenance: sold by Philip Fialides of Impala Antiques to retired Victorian Superintendent of Police Noel Standfield, Noel then sold the sword on to Murray Gray. Noel had done considerable research on this sword and was the first to claim it is an unsigned Gemmill.

Sword has since been confirmed as an unsigned Thomas Gemmill by the Baron of Earlshall who will be featuring this sword in his book.

Thomas Gemmill (Kings Armourer in Glasgow, c. 1718-1737)


Cheers Cathey and Rex
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Old 16th May 2015, 05:40 PM   #161
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Salaams all...In support of the above post please see https://books.google.com/books?isbn=1899820795

Simply go to the page and select the required Illustration which is also loaded with script details...on page 13 ...Scottish Broadsword with Highland Dirk puts the reader in the middle of Swordmaker style, detail, makers names etc etc...Including some Andrea Ferara details.

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.

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Old 21st May 2015, 05:27 AM   #162
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Default Basket Hilted Back Sword (Irish Hilt)

Hi Guys

Just looking back at what I have and haven’t posted on this thread already and realised I missed the third of my Spiracle Pommel Swords, so here it is.

Basket Hilted Back Sword (Irish Hilt)
Date: Circa 1615-40
Nationality: British
Overall Length: 108.6 cm 42 ¾”
Blade length: 95.1 cm 37 5/8”
Blade widest point: 2.8 cm 1 1/8”
Hilt widest point: 11.3 cm 4 2/4”
Inside grip length: 8.5 cm 3 3/8”
Marks, etc.: Blade marked to both sides to a German, Solingen Swordsmith, “CLEMENS DINGER”.

With regards to marks, I flipped the picture of the two makes under the hilt upside down and what I first thought looked like some kind of snake now looks more like two swans. Sometimes I think the more you look at sword marks the more confusing they get.

Description
English Basket Hilt circa 1615-40
English basket hilt sword (Irish Hilt) of early form, approx. Staghorn grip (latter replacement), steel guard of early type with the feature of a loop in the nut that attaches the guard to the Spherical pommel. The backsword blade is attributed to Clemens Dingen (II) recorded as working 1630-1710 and marked with CLEMENS DINGER and the Orb and cross on both sides.

References:
MAZANSKY (C.) BRITISH BASKET-HILTED SWORDS: A TYPOLOGY OF BASKET-TYPE SWORD HILTS pp67
MOWBRAY, Stuart C BRITISH MILITARY SWORDS VOLUME ONE 1600-1660 The English Civil Wars and the Birth of the British Standing Army pp122
OAKESHOTT, Ewart EUROPEAN WEAPONS AND ARMOUR From the Renaissance to the Industrial Revolution pp176-178

Cheers Cathey and Rex
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Old 21st May 2015, 04:11 PM   #163
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cathey
The backsword blade is attributed to Clemens Dingen (II) recorded as working 1630-1710 and marked with CLEMENS DINGER and the Orb and cross on both sides.



WOW, he worked 80 years !

there is a famous Swedish sword known which can be dated to 1627 with a similar standing swan of Clemens Dinger.
I will check it later today.

best,
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Old 22nd May 2015, 09:08 AM   #164
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swan mark and "signature Clemens Deinger" on rapier of Gustav II. Adolf from Sweden carried at battle of Dirschau Poland in 1627.

Clemens Dinger worked for from <1627 to the 1650s, the swan mark (different) was also used by his son Heinrich and used by his grandson Wilhem in 1698 onwards.
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Old 23rd May 2015, 03:31 AM   #165
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Definitely a very nice blade! Apparently Clemens Dinger (the elder) worked in Solingen 1590-1620 and then listed (according to Bezdek p134) in Toledo from 1620-1677. There is another listed among the numerous members of this family as Clemens Dinger zu Wirsberg 1640-45 (not sure what the 'zu' means).
Whatever the case this blade of course probably aligns with earlier blades by the elder as the 1627 date was set as noted by the battle in Poland that year.

I am curious, in the name stamp, why are the 'N's backward (as in the Cyrillic letter 'I') ? Is this some sort of artistic license or deliberately set trademark? In many cases other letters as in Spanish names, inscriptions have uncharacteristic 'E's and other substitutions in various cases.

The swan stamp apparently survived in non 'Dinger' blades well through the 18th century as found in smallswords among other town marks and hallmarks (Dean, 1929). As always curious on other use of the swan markings.
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Old 23rd May 2015, 06:27 AM   #166
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Default Clemens Dinger

Upon cornelistromp advice I purchased copies of Solinger Schwertschmiede Des 16. Und 17. Jahrhundersts Und Ihre Erxeugenisse by ALber Weyersberg and Stephan Kinsman’s European Makers or Edges Weapons, the Marks a Handbook for Museums and Collections. These books arrived the other day and I have found both publications quite useful.

Given the earlier period dating for the sword in question I would attribute the time line to Clemens Dinger worked for from 1627 to the 1650s.

Cheers Cathey and Rex
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Old 25th May 2015, 03:43 AM   #167
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Cathey, interesting references you note that you obtained, can you suggest (via PM) where these might be obtained?

I am inclined to think, according to the referenced data I mentioned, that this blade was probably produced pre-1620, as Clemens Dinger apparently worked 1590-1620 in Germany, then to Toledo. The 1627 date is as I understand a date of provenance with his name rather than a working date reference. The earlier date seems to fit well with what seems a very early English hilt.

Best regards,
Jim
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Old 25th May 2015, 05:57 PM   #168
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim McDougall
Definitely a very nice blade! Apparently Clemens Dinger (the elder) worked in Solingen 1590-1620 and then listed (according to Bezdek p134) in Toledo from 1620-1677.


if he started working as a sword smith in Solingen at around the age of 20, then he stopped in Toledo at the age of 107! ???
This is obviously not the case.
if you could survive childhood and your teenage years you had a good chance of living to your 50s or your early 60s.

I think there are two Clemens mixed together here.

re Toldedo:
Wendelin Boeheim refers to one Spanish? dated blade of Clemente dinger,
CLEMETE DINGER ESPERADO MI SIGNAL PARAIO 1677,
but questioned whether there really has worked a Dinger in Toledo.
It was fashion to put in Solingen Spanish phrases and Toledo look a like marks in the blades.

I expect the career of clemens Dinger as suggested by Boeheim, before 1627 to mid 50s to be very likely.

best
jasper
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Old 25th May 2015, 10:03 PM   #169
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cornelistromp
if he started working as a sword smith in Solingen at around the age of 20, then he stopped in Toledo at the age of 107! ???
This is obviously not the case.
if you could survive childhood and your teenage years you had a good chance of living to your 50s or your early 60s.

I think there are two Clemens mixed together here.

re Toldedo:
Wendelin Boeheim refers to one Spanish? dated blade of Clemente dinger,
CLEMETE DINGER ESPERADO MI SIGNAL PARAIO 1677,
but questioned whether there really has worked a Dinger in Toledo.
It was fashion to put in Solingen Spanish phrases and Toledo look a like marks in the blades.

I expect the career of clemens Dinger as suggested by Boeheim, before 1627 to mid 50s to be very likely.

best
jasper


Well, Andrea Ferara produced thousands of blades over at least two centuries!!
Naturally there seems a disparity in records, and there were a number of smiths in the Dinger family over generations. Without any further thought needed toward the latter Clemens Dinger attribution nor Toledo, my point was primarily that the making of this blade seems to me likely the earlier (pre 1627) and I do agree the period suggested.
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Old 26th May 2015, 05:10 PM   #170
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim McDougall
Well, Andrea Ferara produced thousands of blades over at least two centuries!!
Naturally there seems a disparity in records, and there were a number of smiths in the Dinger family over generations. Without any further thought needed toward the latter Clemens Dinger attribution nor Toledo, my point was primarily that the making of this blade seems to me likely the earlier (pre 1627) and I do agree the period suggested.


Hi Jim, yes 1627 is a kind of Terminus post quem the earliest evidence of date, he must have worked.
.

very best wishes,
Jasper

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Old 30th May 2015, 05:30 AM   #171
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Default Reference books

H Jim,

I purchased both books from Ken Trotman, they are referenced as follows
M099.WEYERSBERG (A.) SOLINGER SCHWERTSCHMIEDE : 1 : 20.00
M009.KINMAN (S.) EUROPEAN MAKERS OF EDGED WEA : 1 : 45.00
Prices in pounds. deliver was very quick.

Cheers Cathey and Rex
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Old 31st May 2015, 02:24 AM   #172
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Default Scottish Basket hilted Broad Sword

Type of Weapon: Scottish Basket hilted Broad Sword
Date: Circa 1730 (18th Century)
Overall Length: 101.6 cm (40 inches)
Blade length: 87 cm (34.3 inches)
Blade widest point: 3.3 cm (1.3 inches)
Hilt widest point: 11.5 cm
Inside grip length: 9.6 cm
Marks, etc.: Numerous marks to blade shoulder and in both fullers haven’t identified any of them as yet.

Description
Basket Hilt-Scottish-c1730-Broad Sword: - Thick steel basket Hilt has typical heart and circle decoration made of thick flat bars, no wrist guard. Blade length is pitted and has dark patina, numerous marks visible on blade shoulder and both fullers, probably German. The fuller runs almost the entire length of the blade. The blade may predate the hilt however they appear to have been together for very long time.

Cheers Cathey and Rex
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Old 31st May 2015, 12:29 PM   #173
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Description
Basket Hilt-Scottish-c1730-Broad Sword: - Thick steel basket Hilt has typical heart and circle decoration made of thick flat bars, no wrist guard. Blade length is pitted and has dark patina, numerous marks visible on blade shoulder and both fullers, probably German. The fuller runs almost the entire length of the blade. The blade may predate the hilt however they appear to have been together for very long time.

Cheers Cathey and Rex[/QUOTE]

@ Cathey,
the blade seems indeed older, 150-200 year, out of the first half of the 16th century and maybe shortened.
this type of mark I noticed more often at the ricasso of a so-called compound or complex hilt from the first half of the 16th century.
Always on the left side of the ricasso (pommel up) of a double fullered
blade.

best,
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Old 1st June 2015, 03:36 AM   #174
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Cathey, thank you so much for the source for those titles, Trotman is an excellent seller.
Jasper, nice catch on that blade!

Best regards,
Jim
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Old 1st June 2015, 07:01 AM   #175
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cornelistromp
Description
Basket Hilt-Scottish-c1730-Broad Sword: - Thick steel basket Hilt has typical heart and circle decoration made of thick flat bars, no wrist guard. Blade length is pitted and has dark patina, numerous marks visible on blade shoulder and both fullers, probably German. The fuller runs almost the entire length of the blade. The blade may predate the hilt however they appear to have been together for very long time.

Cheers Cathey and Rex


@ Cathey,
the blade seems indeed older, 150-200 year, out of the first half of the 16th century and maybe shortened.
this type of mark I noticed more often at the ricasso of a so-called compound or complex hilt from the first half of the 16th century.
Always on the left side of the ricasso (pommel up) of a double fullered
blade.

best,[/QUOTE]
Hi Jasper and Cathy,
the marks on the blade look like they are from the same maker, and yes the blade is from the first half of the 16th century , from south German Or North Italian origin.
The blade in the basket hilt is a similar blade and looks shortened.
Or it could be a blade from the same maker forged in different dimensions to begin with.
The blade of the complex hilt measures 4,5 CM at the cross guard and is 106,5 CM long.
I cant measure the blade on the basket hilt but I think 3,5 would be close.
Also the fullers on the one and a half sword are 7 mm wide.

@ Jasper , you'r first picture is from that Italian book, but were did you find the picture of the second sword ?
kind regards

Ulfberth

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Old 1st June 2015, 01:36 PM   #176
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Old 6th June 2015, 08:01 AM   #177
Cathey
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Default Marks on Ricasso

Hi Jasper and Ulfberth

Thanks for the example of what does appear to be the same mark on the ricasso, pity we cannot establish who the mark belonged to. I am still trying to decide what the marks lower down on the blade itself might be. The middle one looks almost like a scimitar sword, however I think the longer I stare at it the less I know what is.

Cheers Cathey and Rex
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Old 6th June 2015, 09:27 AM   #178
ulfberth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cathey
Hi Jasper and Ulfberth

Thanks for the example of what does appear to be the same mark on the ricasso, pity we cannot establish who the mark belonged to. I am still trying to decide what the marks lower down on the blade itself might be. The middle one looks almost like a scimitar sword, however I think the longer I stare at it the less I know what is.

Cheers Cathey and Rex


Hi Cathey,

Of the marks on the ricasso the one in the mid looks exactly the same,
the one above and below are different or put on from a different angle, horizontal vs upright.

Of the marks on the half of the blade the one in de mid looks like yours, however I can not identify for sure the mark on your blade.
What I am sure of is that the blade in the basket hilt is not shortened, because it is also 1,2 CM more narrow at the ricasso.
I believe that blade was made at this dimensions from the beginning and these dimensions are correct for a basket hilt :
Blade length: 87 cm
Blade widest point: 3.3 cm

One and a half hand sword
Blade length: 106 cm
Blade widest point: 4.5 cm

kind regards

Ulfberth
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Old 8th June 2015, 05:35 AM   #179
Cathey
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Default BASKET HILT Broad Sword c1740, earlier blade

Hi Guys

This is actually one of the first Basket hilts I purchased back in 1996 in Adelaide.

BASKET HILT Broad Sword
Date: Hilt Circa 1740 (18th Century), Blade earlier
Nationality: SCOTTISH
Overall Length: 36 ½” 92.9 cm
Blade length: 31 1/16” 79 cm
Blade widest point: 1 ½” 3.2 cm
Hilt widest point: 5” 12.7 cm
Inside grip length: 4 ¼” 10.8 cm
Marks, etc.: 2 short fullers containing remnants of inscription, only the letters I O H A N T can be read with any certainty. Blade is pitted and has dark patina, possibly predates hilt.

It has been suggested that the name on the blade is Johanus Cole, but with so few letters to go on I am unconvinced at this stage.

Description
BASKET HILT Scottish Broad Sword. The hilt guards are attached to a very prominent and board flat ring under the pommel, which is associated. The space between the rear and additional rear-guards has a very short transverse linking cross-bar, one third of the way up from the blade-end of the hilt. The margins of the plates and shields are scalloped to follow the outline of the piercing. These consist of large coarsely shaped hearts and circles, which give an open appearance to the shield and plates. This hilt has an oval ring on the inside of the hilt. The blade has 2 short fullers containing remnants of inscription, only the letters I O H A N T can be read with any certainty, followed by an anchor mark. Blade is pitted and has dark patina and a number of sharp contact cuts to its edge. I would suggest that the blade definitely predates the hilt.

General Remarks
The same hilt features on a sword in the National Museum of Scotland Edinburgh LA 140

References:
CAMPBELL.A. Scottish Swords from the Battlefield at Culloden. pp 54-55
CURTIS, T The Lyle Official Arms and Armour Review 1976 Pp21
MAZANSKY (C.) BRITISH BASKET-HILTED SWORDS: A TYPOLOGY OF BASKET-TYPE SWORD HILTS pp126 F20.
MOORE, W. Weapons of the American Revolution and Accoutrements. Pp 146, plate E33.
OAKESHOTT, E. European Weapons and Armour. (See Claymore) pp 175-182.

Cheers Cathey and Rex
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Old 21st June 2015, 04:57 AM   #180
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Default British Basket Hilt Cavalry Backsword c1740-55

British Basket Hilt Cavalry Backsword c1740-55

Date: Circa 1740-1755 (18th Century)
Overall Length: 101.5 cm (40 inches)
Blade length: 85.6 cm (33.7 inches)
Blade widest point: 3.296 cm (1.3 inches)
Hilt widest point:
Inside grip length:
Marks, etc. Blade has mark on both sides and one deep fuller 61cm 24” long. There is a number painted on the hilt under the buff liner, probably an old museum reference, which appears to be 1831.over 2RS.

Description
Iron hilt consists of a bun pommel with a rather tall cylindrical tang-button, and a basket of more or less conventional Highland type, except that it lacks the addition of rear-guards, and the entire Saltire bars on the forward corner of each shield towards the pommel combine to form a rounded arch. The rear quillon does not project beyond the perimeter of the basket. The bars, which are of flattened rectangular section, are plain and unpierced. The grip is covered in black rayskin, wire binding is missing but brass Turks heads remain. There is a number painted on the hilt under the buff liner, probably an old museum reference, which appears to be 1831.over 2RS. Backsword blade with dark patina has mark on both sides and one deep fuller ¾ length.

General Remarks
Swords of this type were purchased by the colonels of British cavalry regiments, both horse and dragoons, for the use of their men. Comparable weapons are illustrated in the paintings of British heavy cavalry by David Morier, 1751 at Windsor Castle.

References:
Culloden The Swords and the Sorrows The National Trust for Scotland catalogue. Plate 1:51, pp 48.
Mazansky – Cyrill British basket Hilted Swords Pp95, Fig Fla (C1750)

Cheers Cathey and Rex
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