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Old 8th November 2012, 05:19 AM   #1
trenchwarfare
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Default Viet Cong Weapons Display

Here's a few shots of a display I set up, at the recent Houston Gunshow. A bit O.T., with the modern guns and grenades. However, there are a few ethnographic pieces scattered about. My favorite, is the Cambodian, "Mak" axe. These seem to be pretty scarce. Comments/questions are welcome. Enjoy.
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Old 8th November 2012, 12:17 PM   #2
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Wow...great display and, man, would love to have that old mak!
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Old 8th November 2012, 12:19 PM   #3
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nice display. How is the axe used? looks odd to my eyes :-)
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Old 8th November 2012, 03:40 PM   #4
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Fascinasting display & subject of the post-modern ethnographic use of arms..

Love the grenades! Realy course looking!

Thank you.
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Old 8th November 2012, 11:31 PM   #5
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What a great display - thank you for sharing. Did not know that they used such an array of weapons.
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Old 9th November 2012, 06:10 PM   #6
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Thanks for the kind words guys. It was fun to put together. The Mak is awsome. It is swung, with the curved part of the handle pointing rearward. The cutting edge is on the inside of the blade curve. After you handle one, it feels pretty good in your hands. Early on, during the US involvement in SEA, a hodge-podge of weapons could be encountered. Many locally produced. After 1966, a steady stream of Chi-com, and European Com-bloc weapons were available. However, Anything, and everything was found in weapons caches till 1975. I've heard several accounts, of helicopters returning, riddled with crossbow arrows.
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Old 9th November 2012, 08:36 PM   #7
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Just to think of it, that is what they have used to defeat both the French and the American armies..... Sobering...
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Old 9th November 2012, 10:31 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ariel
Just to think of it, that is what they have used to defeat both the French and the American armies..... Sobering...


The power of self determination against foriegners carrying guns is strong, for many people, I guess?

Look what happend to the British empire once the "natives" came back from world war 2 fully trained, combat/war expierienced & armed with guns & bombs rather than just spears & arrows...

We wernt so strong then......

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Old 9th November 2012, 10:39 PM   #9
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Yep, same thing happened to the French, when their colonial troops went home from IndoChina. Of course, a little indroctrination from Uncle Ho helped things along.
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Old 10th November 2012, 11:02 AM   #10
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Sure fervour of any type, whether Religion or Political helps bolster the combatents.

I would imagine many machete type things were also used bt the VC to traverse jungle etc. ? Were they local dha type things or more comercial pieces?

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Old 10th November 2012, 01:56 PM   #11
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The VC were versatile and adaptable. The used whatever they had.
How 'effective' were their improvised traps? How many troops had to be evacuated because of punji sticks?

Definately need some rubber sandals in that display
And a Dragunov!

Last edited by Atlantia : 10th November 2012 at 07:20 PM.
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Old 10th November 2012, 06:26 PM   #12
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Great display! Out of curiosity, what's that pistol directly below the crossbow?

Best,

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Old 12th November 2012, 03:46 AM   #13
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CONGRADULATIONS A VERY NICE DISPLAY. I HAVE A MAK AND A SMOKEING PIPE FROM THERE. THE MAK WOULD MAKE A GOOD TOOL AS WELL AS A GOOD WEAPON AND ONE DIFFICULT TO BLOCK DUE TO ITS DESIGN AND METHOD OF STRIKEING.
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Old 13th November 2012, 04:36 AM   #14
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I'm sure that any, and every form of chopping tool was used during the conflict(s). Everything from indigenious pieces, to commetial, and military machetes. I would have a pair of "Ho Chi Mihn" sandles, if I could find some of REAL ones. They, like many other pieces of equipment, have been made since the war. The pistol in question, is a break open single shot, of about .44 caliber. The receiver, is made of thick brass plates, riveted together. Then, cut and ground to the desired shape. It originally had a lanyard ring in the butt. Very well made, and most likely copied from a nineteenth century shotgun action.
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Old 13th November 2012, 10:17 PM   #15
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Cheers trenchwarfare, whats the data on the 3rd grenade from the left? the overal body shape reminds me of the 1914 austrian, corn on the cob pieces...used both by hand & as rifle grenades.

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Old 14th November 2012, 12:23 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trenchwarfare
I'm sure that any, and every form of chopping tool was used during the conflict(s). Everything from indigenious pieces, to commetial, and military machetes. I would have a pair of "Ho Chi Mihn" sandles, if I could find some of REAL ones. They, like many other pieces of equipment, have been made since the war. The pistol in question, is a break open single shot, of about .44 caliber. The receiver, is made of thick brass plates, riveted together. Then, cut and ground to the desired shape. It originally had a lanyard ring in the butt. Very well made, and most likely copied from a nineteenth century shotgun action.


Thanks TW. Not that I know much about guns, but I couldn't place it.

Best,

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Old 14th November 2012, 10:10 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spiral
Cheers trenchwarfare, whats the data on the 3rd grenade from the left? the overal body shape reminds me of the 1914 austrian, corn on the cob pieces...used both by hand & as rifle grenades.

Spiral



The third grenade from left, is a Japanese Type 97. The previous model, the Type 91, had a booster, and could be used as a Type 89 (Knee Mortar) projectile, or thrown by hand.
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