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Old 6th January 2017, 02:56 PM   #1
AHorsa
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Default Simple fancy Dusägge

Dear All,

Happy new year!

I just purchased this Dusägge. Should be around 1600. The decoration, especially the pommel, is kind of fancy. Sadly the condition is quite poor. It was covered with paint, I just removed as well as I could. Will give it a bit more treatment the next days.
On the blade I found some marks, which appear to me as 3 crowns (the middle one seems to be mostly gone by rust). Does anyone know this mark?


A similar piece is shown at

https://digitaltmuseum.se/0110244163...%22S-AM%22&i=6

This piece is dated as beginning 17th century. Do you think that´s also fitting to my one?

Looking forward to your comments.

Cheerio
Andreas
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Old 7th January 2017, 12:22 PM   #2
fernando
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You are right Andreas; it looks like three King's heads, a mark typically used by Solingen smiths ... the Wundes family ? .
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Old 9th January 2017, 10:18 AM   #3
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Hi Fernando,

thanks for the hint with the king´s heads. I think you are right.

Cheers
Andreas
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Old 10th January 2017, 01:15 PM   #4
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Does anyone have some information about the style of the pommel and the crossguard? I have never seen a similiar one except the one from the link.

Best regards
Andreas
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Old 10th January 2017, 02:19 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AHorsa
Does anyone have some information about the style of the pommel and the crossguard? I have never seen a similiar one except the one from the link.

Best regards
Andreas
yes, the former curator of the Dutch army museum describes this type as a Dutch maritime saber around 1600 with origin Solingen.

a drawing of this type can be seen on

http://www.adviesoudewapens.nl/

I will check if I have a picture of it somewhere.


best,
Jasper
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Old 11th January 2017, 07:05 AM   #6
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Hi Jasper,

that´s great!!! Very nice! Thanks!

Best regards
Andreas
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Old 11th January 2017, 11:52 AM   #7
fernando
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AHorsa
Hi Jasper,

that´s great!!! Very nice! Thanks!

Best regards
Andreas
Yes indeed, Jasper .
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Old 11th January 2017, 06:25 PM   #8
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I just browsed the book "J. P. Puype (1981): Blanke Wapens - Nederlandse Slag- en steekwapens sinds 1600" and found the sword from the drawing on page 37 (s. image).

Thanks again Jasper!

Cheers
Andreas
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Old 12th January 2017, 08:55 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AHorsa
I just browsed the book "J. P. Puype (1981): Blanke Wapens - Nederlandse Slag- en steekwapens sinds 1600" and found the sword from the drawing on page 37 (s. image).

Thanks again Jasper!

Cheers
Andreas
welcome

picture of the one JP puype Published


©carl koppeschaar
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Old 13th January 2017, 05:31 AM   #10
M ELEY
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I had heard that these dusagge and 'Sinclaire' types saw sea service and it is nice to see some supporting evidence here!
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Old 8th May 2017, 08:22 PM   #11
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King Christian IV of Denmark & Norway bought some 8000 of these in the period 1587-1607 in order to arm the Norwegian farmers. In 1604 he published a new Norwegian law book describing the arms each and every farmer should have, according to the farms size. The small farmer should have a pike, the somewhat larger should have a war axe or a tessak, the wealthier farmers should also have a 'suitable musket'. Four of the really large farm should go together an fund a professional soldier with weapons, horse av salary.

In Denmark it was the nobility that had soldiers and took in the taxes, the king only had 'Livgarden til hest og til fods' (The Life-guard on horse or on feet) and collected import tax from the Øresund straits). He's main income were the Norwegian taxes and his possibility of gathering an army was Norway.

Every year there was a 'våpenting' where the farmer in each district had to show their weapons and that they were in order. If not, they were fined.

My collection of Norwegian military arms therefor starts in 1604 ad I've made a little page on the tessak's, as we call them: http://norskevaapen.no/?p=1776
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