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Old 27th April 2010, 06:47 PM   #1
fernando
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Default European ... still ethnographic sickle of unusual shape

Forget about the handle; obviously a re- or even three- stocking.
But the blade; have you ever seen such style, with that frontwards ( not backwards) apendix on the back ?
Any sugestions?
Fernando

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Old 28th April 2010, 10:56 PM   #2
stephen wood
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Boa noite Fernando, I think it's maybe a thatchers tool for dried grass roofs like you find in Madeira or a vine dressing tool. I have seen some old tools in Portugal which look like African throwing-knives and others which lok like medieval polearms, many types of which were, as we know, adapted from agricultural tools.
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Old 30th April 2010, 01:20 PM   #3
fernando
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Obrigado Stephen,
I am used to these 'multi-use' tools in the country, myself. Besides the purposes you mention, i notice that some stay at the back yard, for cutting wood for the kitchen fire.
It is the the hook in the back that intrigues me, as i have never seen one with such shape.
Yes, if this 'sickle' were a bit larger, it would be close from a tool weapon, like a bill or a guisarme.
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Old 30th April 2010, 02:35 PM   #4
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É uma fouce...
A parte de trás serve para, depois de cortar silvas com a parte da frente, as levantar e juntar para queimar...

Sorry to be in portuguese!

Translation...
is a tool used in the fields. My grandmother still uses one! The front cut the brambles. After the brambles are cut they stay in the ground and the back is used to lift the brambles and then are put on fire

Last edited by blacklacrau; 30th April 2010 at 02:50 PM.
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Old 30th April 2010, 03:26 PM   #5
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Thank you so much, Blacklacrau.
What region is your grandmother from ... somewhere in the north?
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Old 30th April 2010, 03:38 PM   #6
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Yes
Serra do Soajo
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Old 30th April 2010, 03:43 PM   #7
fernando
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blacklacrau
Yes
Serra do Soajo
Ah, that makes sense. This old sickle was acquired in Fafe; could have come from that region.
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Old 4th November 2010, 02:11 PM   #8
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Hi

This is a typical shape of a french croissant - used for hedge cutting,and the back hook used to push loose branches back into the hedge...

Similar tools used in much of Europe - Herefordshire/Wales in Britain, most of France, Italy and Spain (and from the replies you have had, also in parts of Portugal).

Usually found with a longer handle - the blade shapes vary from the semicircular (as yours is) to squarer billhooks type... Not all types have the back hook. It is also found on some small handbills (billhooks) notably the Aberaeron pattern of Wales...

A web search for 'serpe croissant' will find many similar images...

I often see blades from these for sale on USA websites (in reputable dealers' shops), misnamed as medieval bills or pikes - some with obvious 20th century makers marks on them...
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