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Old 13th February 2021, 11:34 AM   #1
xasterix
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Default Show us your Maguindanao panabas

Greetings, in the tradition of the other "show us..." threads, was curious how many members have panabas. To start off, here's mine. 17-inch blade, 14.5-inch handle. There are geometric patterns on the handle that provide a secure grip. Thickest part of spine is 0.5 inches or 1.27 cm. Looking forward to seeing more panabas, TIA!
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Old 13th February 2021, 06:22 PM   #2
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Hello Xas, that begs the question: How do you differentiate between panabas of Maguindanao vs Maranao origin? Thanks in advance!

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Old 13th February 2021, 08:36 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kai
Hello Xas, that begs the question: How do you differentiate between panabas of Maguindanao vs Maranao origin? Thanks in advance!

Regards,
Kai
Hello Kai,

To my understanding, panabas is endemic to the Maguindanaons- the Maranaons don't produce it, except for tourist versions which can be differentiated by its over-intricacy, both in blade and fittings. The Maguindanaons even up to the present time retain knowledge of the panabas and the terms associated with it- warfare, duelling, execution, etc. In period pics, it was always the Maguindanaon datus who used kris, kampilan, and panabas as badges of office.

Hope this clears up things.
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Old 13th February 2021, 09:42 PM   #4
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Thanks, Xas, that makes things easier!

BTW, Cato does mention Maranao names for panabas parts - so, these would be later adapted or spurious? No need to dwell on the modern repros, indeed...

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Old 13th February 2021, 10:06 PM   #5
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To start things off, here a few examples I'm currently taking care of:

(Pics courtesy of Gavin & Oliver)
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Old 14th February 2021, 01:54 AM   #6
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Are these related to what Van Zonneveld called "stick swords" from Flores?

Last edited by Interested Party; 14th February 2021 at 04:10 AM.
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Old 14th February 2021, 04:19 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kai
Thanks, Xas, that makes things easier!

BTW, Cato does mention Maranao names for panabas parts - so, these would be later adapted or spurious? No need to dwell on the modern repros, indeed...

Regards,
Kai
Hi Kai, the probable reason for this is because the Maranao and Maguindanao language are closely linked together; they come from the same root. The Maranao made tourist versions of the panabas, but up to present time, the Maguindanao pandays still make the 'real' panabas for agricultural use. It's a no-frills and usually smaller version of the old panabas, direct to the point.
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Old 18th February 2021, 10:31 AM   #8
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Another example more ...
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Old 18th February 2021, 07:38 PM   #9
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Default Panabi

Decided to a jump in on this and add to the reference photos.
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Old 19th February 2021, 11:25 PM   #10
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Hi All,

Here are my two. The haft on the Padsumbalin appears to have been taken from a hatchet. There is a small, round, copper token (stamped 343) attached to the haft. A former item from military stores that found a home in civilian life perhaps? The blade is a bit loose in the haft (especially in winter) and it may have had an additional steel ferrule at the very top.

Sincerely,
RobT
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