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Old 16th February 2024, 09:26 PM   #1
survtech
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Default A collection of French pocket pistols

This is my collection of French pocket pistols.
First pair are by Jean Aubron of Clissons Nantes
Second pair are by Jean LePage
Al others are by Nicholas-NoŽl Boutet
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Old 19th February 2024, 02:33 AM   #2
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hello
Those of us who live in this part of the world do not have access to see these wonders. We are very grateful to you

Affectionately
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Old 19th February 2024, 06:17 AM   #3
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hello
Those of us who live in this part of the world do not have access to see these wonders. We are very grateful to you

Affectionately
Hi Fernando, we know each other from other forums?


Kind regards

Mike
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Old 19th February 2024, 09:58 AM   #4
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What a great collection and hats off to your Photography,

I myself collect Irish manufactured Flintlock and percussion Pistols and they are just not of the same standard of workmanship at all, yours are just Beautiful

Well done on getting such great items,

Regards and welcome to the forum

Ken
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Old 19th February 2024, 11:46 AM   #5
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Impressive examples; impressive pictures ..
What type of 'sparkers' are those in the LePage pair; not flint ? ...
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Old 19th February 2024, 12:08 PM   #6
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Hello

My name is Fernando Keilty. I live in Argentina

Afectuosamente
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Old 19th February 2024, 12:16 PM   #7
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hello

Answered by Mike, the sparkles on the LePage pair are industrially produced, diamond cut.

Affectionately
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Old 19th February 2024, 09:13 PM   #8
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Hello

My name is Fernando Keilty. I live in Argentina

Afectuosamente
I thought so, hi Fernando Keilty
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Old 19th February 2024, 09:22 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Kmaddock View Post
What a great collection and hats off to your Photography,

I myself collect Irish manufactured Flintlock and percussion Pistols and they are just not of the same standard of workmanship at all, yours are just Beautiful

Well done on getting such great items,

Regards and welcome to the forum

Ken
Thank you Ken, would it be fair to say that generally speaking, British and Irish pistols pistols were more about function than form?

My little works-of-art lean more towards Lady Ga-Ga, whereas the British/Irish a little more Audrey Hepburn.

Here are a few from my collection, now living with other collectors.
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Old 19th February 2024, 09:23 PM   #10
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Impressive examples; impressive pictures ..
What type of 'sparkers' are those in the LePage pair; not flint ? ...
They are machine-cut flints Fernando
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Old 20th February 2024, 06:09 AM   #11
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Default French Pistols

Mike: I love your photographs! How do you take these pictures of your pistols?
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Old 20th February 2024, 06:19 AM   #12
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Default a French Pistol

here is a French blunderbuss pistol in my collection - which is mostly focused on British military flintlocks
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Old 20th February 2024, 09:28 PM   #13
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Mike: I love your photographs! How do you take these pictures of your pistols?
Thank you SwordLover79! How do you take these pictures of your pistols?

I'm not a great photographer but I have a trade secret, and that is love.
Seriously though, I just keep taking photographs until they look as good as they do in my mind's eye.

Once I am happy with a photograph, I cut out the background and place the pistol itself on a transparent background, that way I can then place the pistol in any orientation on any background. Like this catalogue collage.
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Old 20th February 2024, 09:29 PM   #14
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here is a French blunderbuss pistol in my collection - which is mostly focused on British military flintlocks
That's a lovely pistol swordlover79

Cheers

Mike
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Old 21st February 2024, 09:51 AM   #15
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Here is a humblest approach to these fine pistols, taken with no skill ... and long gone to a new owner.


-
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Old 23rd February 2024, 07:58 AM   #16
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Default Lovely little pistol

This is a lovely little pistol Fernando, I've always liked the Queen Anne style.
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Old 25th February 2024, 05:58 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by survtech View Post
This is my collection of French pocket pistols.
First pair are by Jean Aubron of Clissons Nantes
Second pair are by Jean LePage
Al others are by Nicholas-NoŽl Boutet
I was unsure as to whether this unmarked boxed set I have at the shop were English or French but seeing you box I'm 109% sure there French.
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Old 25th February 2024, 07:19 AM   #18
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In most cases it is quite easy to distinguish English from French boxlock pistols. French pistols almost always have a slot in the hammer body into which the slide safety engages and the stock is attached by a pin below the lock cover. English pistols also generally have proof and inspection marks, which is not the case with French variants - although fake stamps can occur here.
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Old 27th February 2024, 03:11 AM   #19
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Quote:
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I was unsure as to whether this unmarked boxed set I have at the shop were English or French but seeing you box I'm 109% sure there French.
British cased pistols are very rarely "French fitted".

My guess would be Belgian.
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Old 27th February 2024, 09:22 AM   #20
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Quote:
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... My guess would be Belgian.
Amen !
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Old 16th March 2024, 01:09 PM   #21
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Default Late arrival

Hello French pistol lovers.
Now that I have your attention, I have a question for you:
does anyone have information about Jean Challeir maker of this hunting pistol (see attached).
I know he/they made arms for aristocrats Count de Clermont, Duke de Bourbon and Prince de Conde; and also that he was made a master in 1758 and operated from Rue Dauphine.
I never see French pistols for sale or auction here in the UK and I've seen no information about Challier other than what I have detailed.
The pistol is in perfect condition and perfect working order; it has a 22cm long barrel with a 15cm(approx.) bore.
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Old 16th March 2024, 01:13 PM   #22
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Thankfully we now have some very impressive pictures of some very impressive pistols.
I particularly like box-lock actions as well as Queen Anne barrels, and here we have both. Thank-you folks, it is much appreciated.
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Old 16th March 2024, 01:52 PM   #23
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Here is what ler Qui est Qui dit
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Old 16th March 2024, 03:57 PM   #24
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Thank-you. I don't speak French so here is what Google makes of the less obvious or previously established bits.
Inventor of a new way of placing the plate of a rifle which makes it capable of being removed and put back in place in an instant. Approved by the academy 1772 and 1774.
He demonstrates that short rifles carry an equal load, further than long ones and is obliged to collect the lead from those which are separated by an operation simple which is particular to it.
Anyone make any sense of it?
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Old 16th March 2024, 04:01 PM   #25
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Danke Corrado.
Ich spreche auch nicht viel Deutsch.
Schade, denn ich mag sowohl Deutsche als auch Franzosen sehr.
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Old 16th March 2024, 07:21 PM   #26
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My five cents:

Inventor of a new method of attaching the lock to a rifle so that it can be removed and reinserted in an instant.
He shows that short rifles carry farther with the same load than long rifles, and undertakes to collect the lead of those that deviate by a simple operation peculiar to himself.
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Old 16th March 2024, 07:34 PM   #27
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Default Ballistics

I know we are deviating from the initial theme of this thread but does anyone conversant with ballistics comprehend his declaration and agree or disagree with it?
I assume this concerns long guns rather than pistols, which seems appropriate given his connection to hunting - but I may be wrong.
The original owner described the pistol as Venerie Louvetier which is apparently wolf-hunting on horseback, run by the Grand Veneur ie Master of the Hunt and Royal Game Warden.

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Old 15th April 2024, 02:55 AM   #28
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From Wike...The Wolfcatcher Royal (French: louvetier royal), a position also known historically as the Grand Wolfcatcher (French: grand louvetier) which is now known as lieutenant de louveterie, was established as a prestigious office in the House of the King during the Ancien Rťgime and Bourbon Restoration of France, tracing its inception to the luparii of Charlemagne. The office had been a fixture of the French Crown as early as the reign of Louis XI, when the first recorded holder of the title Pierre Hannequeau reached prominence in 1467, although it had apparently existed in some form since 1308. Wolfcatchers Royal served under the Grand Huntsman and alongside the Grand Falconer and Captain of the Boar-hunt as members of the king's hunting service. They were responsible for organizing all aspects of the wolf-hunt and presided over the royal pack of wolfhounds and their handlers. A number of lieutenants, huntsmen, houndsmen, and valets assisted the Wolfcatcher Royal. By the 18th century Wolfcatchers, who rotated through office in alternate sessions, received stipends worth roughly between 1200 and 1400 livres.

On 9 August 1787 the office was dissolved due to financing issues but was reinstated in 1797. The office was further modified in 1971 and now serves an administrative function regulating vermin and maintaining healthy wildlife populations. Lieutenants often serve as moderators in disputes between the general public, hunters, and the government, keep the police informed of changes or nuances in hunting laws, and promote the use of ethics in hunting. A major focus of the position is the regulation of deer numbers. Wolfcatchers Royal are still required (in theory) to maintain a pack of at least four hounds capable of hunting boar or fox. There are twelve female lieutenants de louveterie in France. So now we know!!
Peter Hudson.
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Old 27th April 2024, 11:05 PM   #29
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Regarding the Photographic examples shown on this thread are by far the finest I have seen on Forum to date...or on the rest of the web ....Can this technique be boiled down and reproduced...so that others can try to achieve such excellent results...Peter Hudson.
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Old 28th April 2024, 07:13 PM   #30
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Hi Peter. Regarding the quality photography: I’ve spent this last few years photographing objects to produce projections for my girlfriend’s lectures: anything from a Russian gas-mask to a Victorian baby’s feeding bottle.
However: first it has to be understood that grabbing a shot with your camera phone is simply not going to cut it, although the first image - of my Colt SAA – is perhaps a bit of a contradiction as I did use my phone.
So, the first pre-requisite is a good quality, high definition camera, as these French pistol images are pin sharp and highly detailed, and that also means the camera should be tripod mounted.
Second, the light source needs to be large and highly diffused. A bright, cloudy day through white vertical blinds is what I used for the Colt, but a white sheet over the window is the equivalent. I have not superimposed the image of the Colt onto a separate background; to do that we need:
thirdly, a unblemished pure white background. An A1 artist’s board is cheap and readily available, but if you are photographing a sword then it’s not big enough, so use a pure white, smooth sheet stretched (and pinned) on the floor in front of your window. You will need to have your camera elevated and steps to stand on to avoid shadows and in order to present the image without perspective aberation.
Remember, any image can be lit and photographed from any direction if you plan to cut and remove the background using Photoshop; just make sure it is totally illuminated and don’t cast any shadows or produce unlit areas. Look at these French pistols and you will see there are no shadows or excessive dark areas. Again, Photoshop can illuminate any shadows while retaining the average contrast.
In order to present the image (as these pistols have been) variously angled, you need to prop them accordingly. A bright white bean-bag is ideal, although variations on this theme are legion, such as props placed under the background sheet.
Finally, let Photoshop ‘cut and separate’ the item if you want to present it on an alternative background or re-position it.
You did ask!
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