Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > European Armoury

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 5th September 2022, 12:59 PM   #1
Radboud
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 128
Default Anyone know how to read French Hallmarks?

I have acquired a new French smallsword with what looks to be silver hallmarks on one of the annelets. The sword blade is marked to Guyon the Elder from St Michael Bridge, Paris. This supposedly dates the sword from 1750 - 1767 but it would be nice to see what can be found from the hallmarks.

Unfortunately, try as I might, I can’t get a good read on them. Hopefully a member here will be experienced enough to decipher them.
Attached Images
       
Radboud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th September 2022, 02:34 PM   #2
fernando
Lead Moderator European Armoury
 
fernando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal
Posts: 9,120
Default

Have you tried HERE ?
fernando is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 5th September 2022, 09:10 PM   #3
Radboud
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 128
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by fernando View Post
Have you tried HERE ?
Yes, thank you. However, those images are all from nice flat surfaces….. Difficult to match them with the ones on such a narrow surface as annelets.

Just had another look; the crowned V could be a Crowned P for Paris or the wolf's head for Versailles. Or it could be a crowned V, and they don't list. There aren't a lot of makers marks from before 1800 on that site either (I'm thinking the one that shows the E is the maker's mark).

Last edited by Radboud; 5th September 2022 at 11:38 PM.
Radboud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th September 2022, 11:44 PM   #4
werecow
Member
 
werecow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: Leiden, NL
Posts: 188
Default

Possibly relevant, from the Dutch hallmarks page on that site:


Quote:
H & I - The crowned "V", used 1814-1893 as a tax mark applied to all imported, unmarked and invalid marked objects of foreign, national and unknown origin. This duty mark does not give any guarantee of a precious metal standard of fineness, is has been used on metal with as low as .250 silver content. Upon the invalidation of the hallmarks of Louis Napoleon’s kingdom of Holland and those of the French Empire in 1816, this mark has also been used as a tax free census mark.
EDIT: And the E would be the dating code; 1839.
Attached Images
  
werecow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6th September 2022, 01:03 AM   #5
Radboud
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 128
Default

Thank you Werecow, its a possibility. However, the dates don't match the blade (not conclusive I know), and there are three stamps, not four.

Also, the E is part of a larger stamp which I suspect is the makers' mark.
Radboud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6th September 2022, 11:46 PM   #6
Radboud
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 128
Default

I posted on the forums linked with the 925-1000.com site and received the following (very helpful reply):

Quote:
Hello and welcome to the forum.
The hilt of your small sword is made of 950 standard silver as indicated by a date letter mark of a crowned V (poinçon de jurande) for Paris, 1760. The initial “E” appears to be a partial maker’s mark, but you’d need at least another letter and a symbol to make an attribution.

As I’m sure you know, Guyon l’Ainé was a small sword blade maker. You have knowledge that he was active 1750-1767. There is concordance therefore between the date on the hilt and the dates of Guyon’s activity. Au Roi de Chine is the retailer, at the location of Pont Saint-Michel in Paris. The blade itself is not made of silver.

Good luck in your research on this item.
Regards
https://www.925-1000.com/forum/viewt...hp?f=7&t=60969
Radboud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th September 2022, 10:54 AM   #7
fernando
Lead Moderator European Armoury
 
fernando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal
Posts: 9,120
Default

So good you cracked it .
fernando is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 9th September 2022, 03:55 PM   #8
ulfberth
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 376
Default

Congratulations Radboud ! this is one of the nicest ive seen in this genre and in mint condition.
As a former Napoleonic collector im also a sucker for 18thc C French swords and certainly like this one, i mean massive silver, mint condition, the blade makers adress on the blade, ok the French did this but only on the high quality items, this one must have belonged to a high ranked French noble man.
Seeing things like this draws me back more and more to my old love, which made me start collecting in the first place.
kind regards
Dirk
ulfberth is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:04 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.