Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > European Armoury

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 28th October 2022, 02:14 PM   #1
awdaniec666
Member
 
awdaniec666's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Location: Northern Germany
Posts: 144
Lightbulb Chronological listing of Polish-Lithuanian and Hungarian sabers

Hi all,

I´d like to make a little listing available here as a PDF file. It is about sabers used in the area of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and Hungary. It is not about the production origins, solely their existence in a time period based on comprehensive paintings. I noticed there seem to be some misconceptions on forums and auction houses when it comes to dating these swords and talk is cheap so I decided to collect some contemporary depictions of sabers and match them as best as possible with photographs of specimen.
Also reading books about this topic I wonder sometimes why some authors date certain swords in a specific way: Turns out sometimes that authors rely on books written a hundred years ago and take what was then nothing more than a working hypothesis as pure fact. This is annoying. Since these paintings are all veryfied when it comes to their production date, it´s an elegant way of "proof" for a dating.

Please note that the age of the sabers depicted on the photos do eventually not correspond 1:1 with the depiction on those paintings because those have been used throughout many decades.
Some time gaps still remaining because of the lack of contemporary visual sources.

Best,
Patrick
awdaniec666 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th October 2022, 10:01 PM   #2
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

Very nice! Thank you for posting this. I would like to add a few a few observations:

1 - the portret of Vlad Țepeș Drăculea III is actually one from around 1700, commissioned by the Esterhazy family. So, it really represents what the people of 1700 thought what Țepeș looked like, not what he actually looked like(see here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x-JUPq5NEEo). As such it can't be used to prove the existance of "boot-hilt hungarian sabres at that time (1460s). Here's another portrait that makes me scratch my head: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mehmed...med_IV_(2).jpg. According to this portrait, Mehmed IV (circa 1682) had a Polish-Hungarian boot-hilted sabre. What's the likelihood?

2 - Another sabre that looks like Martin Kober/Kubinyi Dániel's (1595) portrait sabre is this one https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/33998

3 - A few relevant pictures can also be found here http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showth...t=10450&page=3

4 - A few more suggestions for which we know the owner and therefore the date:

Nikola Zrinsky/Zrínyi Miklós: https://docplayer.hu/222752167-Tanul...-szablyak.html &&&&& https://sites.google.com/site/hagyom...-zrinyi-miklos

Ferdinand II, Archduke of Austria??? (1526–1564)??? made in 1514https://www.museumap.hu/record/-/rec...ted-bib5847482 &&&& https://docplayer.hu/222752167-Tanul...-szablyak.html
From the second source:
Quote:
The replacement of the Turkish, acorn-shaped grip cap with a flat, crested cap is a Hungarian peculiarity. An illustrative example of this is the Turkish-style decorative saber - made in 1514 - which is also Tirol II. It comes from the former collection of Archduke Ferdinand, and not only the grip cap, but also the cross iron was changed to a Hungarian shape. The letters IHS can be seen on the front, while the I.F. monogram can be seen on the latter. Presumably, the saber is connected to the Hungarian king Ferdinand I (1526–1564), who received the saber from Hungarian lords on the occasion of some notable event, such as a coronation or other celebration. It was used not only for newly manufactured sabers, but also for looted or gifted Turkish weapons, where the original cap was replaced. In its development, not so much practicality as fashion may have played a role.
Bebek György: https://sites.google.com/site/hagyom...-bebek-gyoergy &&&&&&&&& https://www.szadvar.hu/2021/07/bebek-gyorgy-szablyaja/

Đorđe Branković (1688?): https://oruzjeonline.com/2021/10/04/...djenog-kralja/

Thury György (1519 -1571), not a sabre, but a pallash: https://szablyavivas.blogspot.com/20...ry-kardja.html &&&&&& https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thury_Gy%C3%B6rgy

There is also Gjergj Kastrioti/Skanderbeg's pallash, but it's provenance is debatable https://carolynperry.blogspot.com/20...derbeg-in.html

It seems that the fashion for sabres in the 1500s/early 1600s was that of long quillons. Just look at Bathory, Zrinsky, Bebek, Ferdinand's sabres. Even Thury's pallash has long quillons. Each quillon is roughly the same length as the handle. So most likely these ones are from the 1500s as well https://www.museumap.hu/record/-/rec...ted-bib5810577 &&& https://skd-online-collection.skd.mu...s/Index/284576 &&& https://skd-online-collection.skd.mu...s/Index/289065 &&& https://sites.google.com/site/hagyom...zablya-szikszo &&& https://www.khm.at/de/objektdb/detail/371721/?lv=detail
Maybe this one too https://www.khm.at/objektdb/detail/371717/
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29th October 2022, 11:42 AM   #3
awdaniec666
Member
 
awdaniec666's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Location: Northern Germany
Posts: 144
Default

Hey Teisani,
thanks a lot for this lot of information - I will go through it when I got the time. Also thank you for poiting out the correct date of Vlad´s depiction, guess I missed something there.
awdaniec666 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th November 2022, 08:16 PM   #4
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

A few period depictions of 16th and early 17th century East European sabres in portraits:
Attached Images
      
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19th December 2022, 01:24 PM   #5
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

An interesting site with portraits of mostly Hungarian nobility (many of them with their sabres).
https://sites.google.com/site/hagyom...szazad/adattar
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19th December 2022, 02:57 PM   #6
awdaniec666
Member
 
awdaniec666's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Location: Northern Germany
Posts: 144
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Teisani View Post
An interesting site with portraits of mostly Hungarian nobility (many of them with their sabres).
https://sites.google.com/site/hagyom...szazad/adattar
What an exceptional source! Thanks for sharing!
awdaniec666 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th December 2022, 10:40 AM   #7
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by awdaniec666 View Post
What an exceptional source! Thanks for sharing!
You're welcome. Another useful search phrase in Google images, you already may know of, is "portret sarmacki". It gives plenty of images of noblemen wearing sabres.
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28th December 2022, 11:14 AM   #8
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

In addition to sabres, I recommend looking at pallashes as well, since they have roughly the same hilts as contemporary sabres.
Here are two hussar pallashes from Lithuania which I rarely see posted:
1 - https://vdkm.limis.lt/en/eksponatai/...ype=EKSPONATAS
2 - https://www.limis.lt/en/paieska/perz...ype=EKSPONATAS
Attached Images
   
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1st January 2023, 06:48 PM   #9
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

Another thing to consider when dating sabres can be scabbard fittings. Here's an interesting article on this topic (in Russian, but Google translate works well enough). https://www.kitabhona.org.ua/libwar_armor/oboyma1.html
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2nd January 2023, 12:23 PM   #10
awdaniec666
Member
 
awdaniec666's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Location: Northern Germany
Posts: 144
Default

Teisani,
I regret not having the time in the moment to dive in a extended discussion about our topic here with you but I follow your posts with great interest. Feel free to take the PDF from above and add information to it, if you want. I think this would be beneficial for all readers. There is so much to talk about and I will come back to it on a regular basis after finishing my final university exam which consumes nearly all of my time until April I had the urge to write this because you´re putting in that effort and so much in-depth information. Thanks again for that.
awdaniec666 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2nd January 2023, 01:50 PM   #11
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by awdaniec666 View Post
Teisani,
I regret not having the time in the moment to dive in a extended discussion about our topic here with you but I follow your posts with great interest.
No worries awdaniec666. For now, I will try to compile sabres/depictions of sabres that can be reliably dated to the period of interest (eg Nikola Zrinski's sabre, which physically exists and of which there is also a period depiction).

Once all this compilation is done, the analysis/conversation of said data can begin. I'll post everything I have in the next week (not much, just what I could find online).

A few notes:

1 - The title is "Chronological listing of Polish-Lithuanian and Hungarian sabers"; however, I believe some Byzantine/Ottoman Empire sabres from the 1400s-1600s may be included for analysis as Central and Eastern Europe did not develop in a vacuum.

2 - I have some doubts that the sabre depicted here has a karabela hilt (first page your PDF). When you have time, could you please provide a higher quality picture, or tell me where was it taken? I just have doubts that the karabela hilt originated in the early 1500s.

3 - The picture of the Ferdinand II, Archduke of Austria sabre is really nice . When you have time, can you please provide it in a higher resolution on this thread?

Have a nice day and good luck with your exam!
Attached Images
  
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2nd January 2023, 07:00 PM   #12
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

A nice book: Huszárfegyverek a 15-17. században by Kovács S. Tibor https://issuu.com/lajosyossarian/doc...sz__rfegyverek
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd January 2023, 05:17 PM   #13
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

A few beautiful drawings by Italian artists from the 15th century of Ottoman/Byzantine people (and their sabres). Luckily in high resolution . This kind of artwork really tickles my fancy .

1 - Sketches of the Emperor John VIII Palaeologus, a monk, and a sabre - by Pisanello in 1438:

Source: https://www.artic.edu/artworks/11356...rd?q=Pisanello
I highly recommend studying the high-resolution version in the link.

PS: There is also a depiction of a bow and quiver here (https://www.artic.edu/artworks/11356...iver-of-arrows) and another depiction of John VIII Palaiologos (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/F..._Pisanello.jpg). Although not really relevant to this discussion, still nice.
Attached Images
   
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd January 2023, 06:06 PM   #14
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

2 - Ottoman janissary by Gentile Bellini 1479 - 1481 (probably at Constantinople).

Source: https://www.britishmuseum.org/collec...ject/P_Pp-1-19
Attached Images
  
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd January 2023, 06:26 PM   #15
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

3 - Ippolito de' Medici in Hungarian costume by Tiziano Vecellio in 1533.
Source: https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ritrat...o_de%27_Medici & https://gallerix.org/album/Titian/pic/glrx-323132363
I know I posted this one before, but it's worth posting a close-up of that sabre.
Attached Images
  
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd January 2023, 08:58 PM   #16
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

Some more period depictions:

4 - Battle of Orsha/Bitwa pod Orszą - probably by a painter from the circle of Lukas Cranach the Elder, most likely Hans Krell in 1525 - 1535.

Of course I posted this one, I'm only human..couldn't resist! The famous painting depicting the battle of Orsha from 1514. It's a real treasure for anyone interested in that period/region's weapons.
Nice summary about it can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ILwHcl8y2fk

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle...Orsz%C4%85.jpg

The painting is much too big and detailed to post in low resolution here, so instead here are some close-ups.

Muscovites
Attached Images
      
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd January 2023, 09:03 PM   #17
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

Polish & Lithuanians
Attached Images
          
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd January 2023, 09:22 PM   #18
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

5 - The great triumphal chariot, detail: The Hungarian trophy by Albrecht Dürer, 1518 original.

Detailed design for the woodcut sequence of imperial triumphal procession Maximilian I, printed in its entirety for the first time in 1526, Dürer was responsible for the design of the carriage with the marriage of Emperor Maximilian to Mary of Burgundy and published it in 1522 in eight sheets.

Source: http://www.zeno.org/Kunstwerke/B/D%C...?hl=ungarische

Not very detailed, but every source helps.
Attached Images
  
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd January 2023, 09:49 PM   #19
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

6 - Nikola IV Zrinski (Hungarian: Szigeti Zrínyi Miklós; 1508–1566), Ban of Croatia from 1542 until 1556.

Source: Leónidasz a végvidéken. Zrínyi Miklós (1508-1566) by Varga Szabolcs

Note: I've posted this one before, but this one's in higher quality.

Source: https://docplayer.hu/222752167-Tanul...-szablyak.html
The sabre resides at the Museum of Fine Arts in Vienna (Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien), Austria. According to Prof. dr. Major General József Padányi, the likely year - with the dragon coat of arms of the Zrínyis on the grip caps - is 1563. At that time, Miklós Zrínyi was at the height of his power, and at the coronation of Maximilian II (King of Hungary September 8, 1563 - 12 October 1576), the saber could have been a gift from Zrínyi, who carried the state apple, as a souvenir. A painting was also made of this event, proving the above.

The previous posted source dates the painting to 1541-42. So, it's a bit confusing.
Attached Images
    
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th January 2023, 05:57 PM   #20
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

7 - "Gothic" sabre (1470?-1520?) at the Magyar Nemzeti Múzeum Budapest

This is probably the oldest Hungarian sabre known. It also has the earliest depiction of a hussar, on the scabbard. Most likely originaly Ottoman sabre (from 1470-1500?), later (probably during the 1510s) its scabbard was modified to incorporate the hussar depiction. Another reason to classify this as Hungarian rather than Ottoman is the representation of Adam & Eve on the scabbard. So not much is known about this one. The best source of info on this one, I've found is "SZABLYÁK A KÉSŐ KÖZÉPKORI MAGYARORSZÁGON by KOVÁCS S. Tibor" https://library.hungaricana.hu/en/vi...g=270&layout=s

There are a few other ottoman swords with similar hilts around the world (Turkey, Russia, and USA).
Attached Images
    

Last edited by Teisani; 4th January 2023 at 06:28 PM.
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th January 2023, 06:34 PM   #21
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

8 - Szikszó sabre

Discovered in Szikszó, Borsod-Abaúj-Zemplén county, Hungary. Currently resides at the Magyar Nemzeti Múzeum, Budapest. Can find no other info on it.

https://sites.google.com/site/hagyom...zablya-szikszo
Attached Images
 
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th January 2023, 10:52 PM   #22
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

9 - Bebek György sabre

Bebek György (lived 1529-1567), became a prisoner of the Ottomans in 1562 but was released in 1565 from captivity and given this sabre by sultan Suleiman I the Magnificent.

Quote:
For his own salvation, György Bebek secretly offered Hally Pasha, who had contact with the Luminous Padisah, 50 Turkish prisoners, 10 thousand gold ducats, and many silver and gold adornments, which his worried wife, Mistress Zsófia Patócsy, sent to the Porta in Stambul. As a result of this "carrot", George Bebek was led from his place of detention to the Divan, the highest political center of the Ottoman Empire, on March 6, 1565. He was dressed in an expensive kaftan so that he could pay homage to the Sultan in a dignified manner. Bebek kissed the hand of Suleiman I, who sternly urged him to be a supporter of his Hungarian vassal, John Sigismund, and served him afterwards. At Suleiman's behest, the court officials brought forth a splendid Arabian thoroughbred, which was surrounded by a shiny, expensive horse tool. Other pashas gave him another four horses. In order not to go home as a beggar, bags of money were placed in the pockets of his robes, totalling 10 thousand ospora (aka acpe, Turkish silver coins). Among the gifts was handed over a superb saber, the main character of this article.
The blade has an inscription: Amel-i Mohammed Misri (the work of Mohammed of Egypt)
Total Length: 94cm
Blade width: 3.3cm
Weight with scabbard: 2kg

Source: https://www.szadvar.hu/2021/07/bebek-gyorgy-szablyaja/
Attached Images
  
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th January 2023, 11:10 PM   #23
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

9 - Bebek György sabre (continued)

Personal opinion...Bebek's sabre seems to be a typical (my estimates 1540s to 1590s) boot hilt, with wire wrap, long quillons (about same length as the handle). Yet it was a gift from the Sultan. The question is whether:
- the Sultan had craftsmen that could make Hungarian style hilts.
- it was a looted by the Ottomans, later gifted to Bebek.
- the sabre's original hilt and scabbard was changed later between the 1565 (release date) and 1567 (year of death). My opinion no likely but who knows.

Really interesting... Bebek's sabre looks very, very similar to this sabre in Sultan Mehmed IV (1642 – 1693) portrait in 1682. I really wonder if this painting is authentic (no idea if yes or no), or why would the Sultan be wearing a Hungarian sabre, 100 years out of date. Really strange! Anybody else have any idea/opinions about this painting?

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mehmed...med_IV_(2).jpg
Attached Images
  
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6th January 2023, 12:17 AM   #24
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

10 - Knyaz (prince) Fyodor Mikhailovich Mstislavsky (? - 1540)

This one is a Muskovite sabre, reminescent a bit of some sabres depicted in the "Battle of Orsha" painting. On the blade's spine there is the incription "Сабля Князь Федора Михайловича Мстиславскаго/Saber of Prince Fyodor Mikhailovich Mstislavsky". The blade is made by "Abdul-Ali Qasim from Egypt". Looks like a typical Ottoman sabre of the era, except for the flat end-cap.
Total length: 102cm --- Blade length: 86.36cm --- Blade width: 5.65cm (8cm at the yelman) --- Thickness: 0.8-1cm --- Quillon: 22cm --- Languettes: 10cm --- Weight with scabbard: 2.6kg
https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Мстисл...ич
https://pikabu.ru/story/istinno_boga...vskogo_4919872
https://mayak-parnasa.livejournal.com/1227109.html
Attached Images
     

Last edited by Teisani; 6th January 2023 at 02:51 PM.
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th January 2023, 06:44 PM   #25
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

11 - Two more Muscovy sabres? They look a bit like some of the sabres in the "Battle of Orsha painting".
Attached Images
  
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th January 2023, 07:51 PM   #26
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

12 - Ottoman/Mamluk sabre (probably from early or mid 16th century??).. It's hilt is reminiscent of some sabres depicted in some portraits, like Jan Zamoyski's (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_Za...n_Zamoyski.PNG) & Jan Daniłowicz's(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_Da..._Ruthenia).PNG). Portraits also posted above.

Quote:
The blade is very similar in nature to a group of 15th-century blades which have been housed in the imperial armoury in Istanbul for centuries, which are all identified as being Mamluk in origin. These swords would have been brought back to the capital city by Ottoman forces after they had battled the Mamluk armies in Syria and Egypt during the late 15th and early 16th centuries, ultimately defeating them at Ridanieh in 1517. (See U. Yucel, Islamic Swords and Swordsmiths (Istanbul, U.I.C. Research Centre for Islamic History, Art and Culture, 2001), pp.93-113 for various published examples from this group of slightly curved swords with blades of Mamluk provenance and hilts attached later by Ottoman craftsmen, all part of the collection held in Topkapi Palace.) The blades were later remounted with a variety of different hilt forms by Ottoman craftsmen. It is likely that this sword received the same treatment and was refitted with furniture made to appeal to Turkish taste. The foliate ornamentation on the metal fittings is typical of the style present on many of the weapons and objects of decorative art emerging from the workshops of the Ottoman court during the 16th century. The empty indentations visible on the mounts would probably have housed precious or semi-precious stones. The hilt, scabbard clasps and chape closely resemble another set attached to one of the sacred swords in the Topkapi Palace in Istanbul which is said to have been associated with 'Abu'l Hasene (Abu Hasan), scribe of the Prophet of God’, and is thought to have been remounted by court craftsmen around 1560. The hilt form with its long spatulate quillons is similar to others produced and illustrated during the reign of Suleiman I (Suleiman the Magnificent), Sultan of the Ottoman Empire 1520-1566. (See Ricketts and Missillier, 'Splendeur Des Armes Orientales' (Paris: Acte-Expo, 1988), p.157.)
Blade Length 817 mm
Scabbard Length 830 mm
Scabbard Weight 0.457 kg
Sword Length 960 mm
Sword Weight 1.154 kg

Source:https://collections.royalarmouries.o...c-object-31132
Attached Images
  
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th January 2023, 08:18 PM   #27
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

13 - Tomb effigy of Balassa Menyhért/Melchior Balassa (1511-1568) - in the church of Sološnica, Slovakia.

Inscription on the tomb says:
Quote:
To the famous and important hero Melchior Balassi of Gyarmat, enlightened to advice, magnanimous in faithfulness to his promise, he had this monument built by his father, highly esteemed, son Štefan Balassi. He died in Vienna in the year of Christ the Lord 1568, in the month 9. At the age of 57 years.
Nice triple fullered blade...no Ottoman blade for Melchior . Since it was his son that had the effigy made, we don't really know how much later after his death it was. About his son Štefan Balassi/Balassa István we know:

Quote:
His second son, Stephen, freed from Báthori's captivity in 1570, became a supporter of King Maximilian, from whom he received several estates. He set up a printing house in Detrekő, where in 1584 the ecclesiastical sermons of Peter Bornemisza began to be printed. John B. became famous at a young age for his duel with the Spanish valiant Francesco de Lasso, in which he defeated his powerful and boastful opponent. In 1550 he became captain of Szolnok Castle, and in 1555 leader of the rising nobility and captain of the mining towns: in 1562 he was already the high sheriff of Hont and Zólyom counties, and as such he laid siege to the castle of Szécsény, but after receiving a wound on his hand, he abandoned the siege. In 1569, together with his relative István Dobó, he was tried for calling on János Sigismund Szapolyai to attack Maximilian. He was thrown into prison, from which he was freed. In 1572, he was pardoned by the intercession of the National Assembly, and in 1574 he became a royal chief doorman and an examiner of appellate cases. In 1575, the castle of Kékkő was occupied by the Turks. A year later, he died.
So, between 1570 (Istvan's release) and 1576 (István's death).

https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balassa_Menyh%C3%A9rt
https://malackepohlady.sk/?p=1718
https://ujkor.hu/content/emberveres-...fosztas-forras
https://malackepohlady.sk/?p=22263
Attached Images
  

Last edited by Teisani; 7th January 2023 at 08:33 PM. Reason: I am stupid :(
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th January 2023, 09:06 PM   #28
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

14 - Tomb effigy of Dobó István (1502 - 1572)

He died in 1572 at his home in Szerednye (a settlement located in present-day Transcarpathia, halfway between Uzhhorod and Munkács), and on 28 June his body was brought to Dobóruszka-HU/Ruská-SK (in the Košice Region of eastern Slovakia). The red-marble Renaissance sarcophagus made by his son Dobó Ferec around 1610. In the sanctuary of the church in Dobóruszka. The side panels of the tomb, which can still be seen here today, are original, but the famous cover is only a copy. The original marble tombstone cover can be seen today in the István Dobó Castle Museum in Eger, in the Heroes' Hall, complete with a copy of the side panels and a so-called "crab wolf" marble helmet that was later added to the tombstone. The following inscription can be read on it: "Here is the grave of István Dobó, who repulsed the thousands of armies of the Turks from the walls of Eger, and by an excellent triumph, he drove away the fate of Hungarian land. His son, Ferenc Dobó, claimed this memory to be truly worthy of national mourning." So, the effigy was made 52 years after his death! The photos are of the original.

Difficult to tell if the sabre depicted here has very-long quillons like the Zrinski/Bebek/Bathory sabres. One quillon is noticeably longer than the other (fragmented though).

PS: Don't worry, more dead guys to come!

Sources:
https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dob%C3...n_(katonatiszt)
https://cbc-artspace.com/locations/d...istvana-doboa/
Attached Images
    

Last edited by Teisani; 8th January 2023 at 04:30 PM.
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 8th January 2023, 04:57 PM   #29
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

14 - Tomb effigy of Thurzó György (1567 - 1616)

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...eml%C3%A9k.jpg

Also, a mortuary portret, but it says it's from 1621??: https://hu.wikibooks.org/wiki/F%C3%A...alon,_1621.jpg
Attached Images
   

Last edited by Teisani; 8th January 2023 at 09:35 PM.
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 8th January 2023, 05:30 PM   #30
Teisani
Member
 
Teisani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Romania
Posts: 314
Default

Wonder what kind of sabre he had https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/F%C3%A1jl:Gregor_Baci.jpg
Teisani is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
hungary, ottoman, saber poland

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:41 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.