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-   -   A French navaja (http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=5844)

fernando 20th January 2008 05:22 PM

A French navaja
 
4 Attachment(s)
For non scholar small collectors, allways full of uncertainties, it is allways a pleasure to find a piece out there, that can be identified in authorized books or catalogues, instead of just guessing what the thing is, or could be.
This French navaja pattern is fully represented in Forton's main work, both in pages 150 as in 190.
The cuttler for this one was Batisse, with a punction also referred in Forton's, as having been in use between end XVIII beg. and XIX centuries. For the rest of the century, Batisse used a different punction. Therefore the dating of this example is easily atyributed, which is another pleasure.
The grips are half turtle half decorated bone.
Pitty the turtle plates are a bit swollen ( this the term ? )
The blade has a few small dents, sort of looking like saw theeth. I don't think i will ever sharpen it ... better live it like that.
Blade length 6", total length 13".
Your coments will be welcome, Gentlemen ... Master Chris ? :cool:
Fernando

Rich 20th January 2008 07:38 PM

Very nice and good info. I have two of the same design signed Beauvior
which I believe is also a French maker.

Rich S

fernando 20th January 2008 07:49 PM

Thanks Rich,
That means you are well within.
Beauvoir, also from Thiers ( France ), XIX century, is precisely the cuttler that signs the two examples i mentioned, in Forton's book.
Fernando

Dom 21st January 2008 12:20 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Hi Fernando
you shocked me ;)
the title advertisement "A French navaja" :eek:
in fact, must be "A navara manufactured in France" :p
because "navara" it's a Spanish knife, not at all French,
anyway, very nice knife, with handle and blade too elegant.
lucky man ;)

regards

+

Dom

ps/ the nearest french knife production, with look of navaja, is "Laguiole",
but not oldest than XIXe, as well as here, Laguiole from Laguiole, not from Thiers ;)

Chris Evans 21st January 2008 02:14 AM

Hi fernando,

Interesting piece and as you say, it is nice to be able to positively identify it.

This folding knife is a good representative of those that flooded into Spain during the 19th century and severely undercut the native product; They were better made and a more attractive buy.

Something to note is that the blade fixation system (in the open position) is what I call a demi-lock, and which did not actually lock the blade, rather required considerable downward pressure before it could be closed. This was a requirement of Spanish law, so as to downgrade the potential of the knife as a weapon by making thrusting a very risky proposition for the wielder (the blade could close and cut the fingers!)

Cheers
Chris

fernando 22nd January 2008 10:41 PM

Hi Dom

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dom
Hi Fernando
you shocked me ;)
the title advertisement "A French navaja" :eek:
in fact, must be "A navara manufactured in France" :p
because "navara" it's a Spanish knife, not at all French,

In fact a "French navaja", meaning a French knife made the Spanish way.
... not a couteau ... or a canif :eek:

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dom
anyway, very nice knife, with handle and blade too elegant.
lucky man ;)

Thank you :)

... and my compliments to your Laguioles

fernando 22nd January 2008 10:43 PM

Hi Chris,
So sorry for the delay in thanking you for your precious input.
Keep well
Fernando

Chris Evans 23rd January 2008 01:07 AM

Fernando,

Thank you and

Cheers
Chris


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