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Old 14th December 2008, 03:21 PM   #1
Matchlock
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Default A fine Styrian snap tinderlock gun, ca. 1525, in the Graz Armory

Made by Peter Hofkircher who had his workshop at the nearby town of Mürzzuschlag.

It features a part lock plate chararcertistic of the 1520s-30 though complete lock plates were widely in use by then. The stock is of either limewood or pearwood.

Though having a recoil stop (hook) both its relatively small caliber of 15.7 mm and relatively light weight of 8.7 kilograms denote that is not really a wall gun but rather a long harquebus with a support hook.

The overall length of the piece is 179 cm.

Enjoy.

Michael
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Old 14th December 2008, 03:28 PM   #2
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The rest.

The ramrod channel is offset because of the hook.

Note the long muzzle section left characteristically unstocked.

Michael
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Old 14th December 2008, 03:31 PM   #3
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The pic of the broad fish tail buttstock should not have been in there; instead, these should have.

Michael
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Old 14th December 2008, 03:34 PM   #4
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Hopefully I will get to right pic this time ...
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Old 14th December 2008, 03:36 PM   #5
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Nooo ...
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Old 14th December 2008, 03:36 PM   #6
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Done at last ...
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Old 14th December 2008, 04:12 PM   #7
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As my brilliant firend Richard will have noted the back-sight is indented at the sides for a tube which is now missing.

Michael
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Old 14th December 2008, 06:41 PM   #8
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Default A very fine and rare snap tinder lock harquebus, ca. 1525-30

... in a private collection (sadly not mine).

Enjoy the dismantled mechanism shown here for study for the very first time ever - that should enable you to rebuild it, Richard!

The brass inlay is quite common to the period; though not marked, this beautiful little gun was certainly made in South Germany, probably Augsburg or Nuremberg. The open back sight tunnel is quite unusual and somewhat contradictive to the basical function of a tubular back sight: to narrow the focus ...

The stock varnish is a greenish now turned dark color, the ramrod a poor replacement.

Michael
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Old 14th December 2008, 06:45 PM   #9
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I should add that, telling from its aroma and grain, the stock is of limewood.

Michael
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Old 14th December 2008, 06:51 PM   #10
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Default A very fine snap tinder lock harquebus, ca. 1525-30, at the Pilsen museum

Very similar to the preceeding one but longer.

Michael
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Old 15th December 2008, 02:46 PM   #11
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Very interesting photos again Michael!!
The details are wondeful.
The little gun is rather interesting too.

It sometimes takes me a while to figure things out, and this one is no exception!
It looks very well made, and so unique because of its great age. Lovely condition too.

Thanks you for showing it with its 'guts' out!
Are those little pieces of wood, that cover the trigger/scear spring?
If so, what holds them in? does the brass lock-plate partialy cover the rear one, and the mainspring hold the front one?
It is amazing that it hasn't lost any parts, over its very long life!
I Must have a bash at making such a lock!
Thank you for these pictures, they are worth a fortune!

More later, ...must go...

Richard.
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Old 16th December 2008, 11:31 AM   #12
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Hi, Richard,

In fact, both the Pilsen gun and the litlle guy did lose a few pieces of wood covering the trigger/sear spring. They have been repaced in both guns but are completely original in the Hofkircher gun in Graz which retains them all.

Interesting enough, in the little harquebus, the rear little piece of wood is not held at all, just inserted (!); there are no old traces of glue whatsoever. The forward splice of wood is, as you wrote, just barely kept in place by the mainspring.

Of course, those two pieces would have fitted in much better when the wood was new and without any shrinkage. The part locks disappeared from the scene very soon, though, and complete lock plates took over for evidently practical reasons.

Michael
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Old 17th December 2008, 02:29 AM   #13
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Michael,

It's a wonder those little pieces of wood ar ever present, if only held in by friction!
You don't think the rear one could at one time have been attached to the spring somehow?

Re. the open topped rear sight;
Do you think it was opened up later, and was originally closed?
The brass inlay appears to be missing from the flat area, and looks a bit like the sight was 'modified' at some time?

what do you think?

All best wishes,

Richard.
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Old 17th December 2008, 10:20 AM   #14
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[QUOTE=Pukka Bundook]Michael,

It's a wonder those little pieces of wood ar ever present, if only held in by friction!
You don't think the rear one could at one time have been attached to the spring somehow?

I don't think so; had it been attached to the spring it would have had to follow its lateral movement.

Re. the open topped rear sight;
Do you think it was opened up later, and was originally closed?
The brass inlay appears to be missing from the flat area, and looks a bit like the sight was 'modified' at some time?

Great minds think alike, Richard, that brilliant idea of yours really explains the unusual opening! Thank you so much.

Michael
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Old 17th December 2008, 12:11 PM   #15
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Michael,

Your last sentence reminds me of a quote I heard somewhere;

"Great minds think alike,.............................and so do ours!"

You are quite right, the spring could not have had the wood attached.

Richard.
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Old 17th December 2008, 01:17 PM   #16
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Great minds think alike ... and so do ours, Richard!

Splendid. I didn't know that one but like it Very much!

Michael
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