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Old 21st October 2012, 01:47 AM   #1
VANDERNOTTE
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Default 2 knives for iden

bonsoir
strange blade whis awl,I show the pic to a dealers in paris 20 years ago
and i say they ar italian
regard
jacques
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Old 21st October 2012, 10:00 AM   #2
kronckew
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they look a lot like corsican 'vendetta' knives - this is a smaller one. they also come bigger.
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Old 21st October 2012, 11:53 AM   #3
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Hi Jacques,

As Kronckew says, they do look like Corsican Vendetta knives.
The one in Kronck's picture was mine.

Many of these have etched blades and are 'souvenir' items.
Yours appear to be old examples and to have adaptation for threading twine through their fine points. I would expect that they are 'true' Corsican knives and were made for sailors/fishermen to be used to repair sails or nets if needed.

Very interesting and rather desirable knives.

Best Regards
Gene
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Old 4th November 2012, 09:53 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Atlantia
Hi Jacques,

As Kronckew says, they do look like Corsican Vendetta knives.
The one in Kronck's picture was mine.

Many of these have etched blades and are 'souvenir' items.
Yours appear to be old examples and to have adaptation for threading twine through their fine points. I would expect that they are 'true' Corsican knives and were made for sailors/fishermen to be used to repair sails or nets if needed.

Very interesting and rather desirable knives.

Best Regards
Gene

Corsican Italian Knifes 100% look aerly also .Nice pieces :-)
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Old 13th November 2012, 03:19 PM   #5
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hello together
these daggers are Italian, from the area around Genoa.
and they are called Genovese
absolutely amazing pieces
greetings Chregu
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Old 14th November 2012, 11:37 AM   #6
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Very nice early pieces. I'm a novice when it comes to these, but I've read in the past that they got their name when they were used as a 'calling card' in family/regional vendettas, much as the Special Forces left death cards as markers in Vietnam? A lot of halabaloo, or the real story? Gene, you mention they were used on ships? Makes sense, but perhaps with local or merchant fishermen only, versus naval? You might remember the controversy in our discussion of clasp knives used by naval personnel. I still say some made it to sea-
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