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Old 4th November 2008, 05:04 PM   #1
Matchlock
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Default Gothic crossbows in gemeral historic documents

The first a fine crossbowman's pavise, remarkably painted in detail; in the L÷wenburg, Kassel.

Michael
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Old 4th November 2008, 05:46 PM   #2
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The first a highly interesting votive picture donated to Holy Mary by the South Tyrolian soldier Lugwig Klinkhammer and dated 1487.
The text says that Klinkhammer was shot with a falconet at Rovereto castle in the Venetian war; he prayed to Holy Mary and Child of Trento for help and survived. So he thankfully devoted this picture to God.

Note the quarrel stuck in the horse's hind quarter and the falconet ball and broken crossbow parts below.

Following a detail of the martyrdom of St. Sebastian, painted by Hans Holbein in 1516, and an illumination from the Jagd- und Fischereibuch (book on hunting and fishing) of the Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I., ca. 1508, showing himself on a hunt employing a richly onamented crossbow.

Michael
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Old 26th November 2008, 03:31 PM   #3
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Default Early Renaissance Crossbows in 1533: The Amsterdam Town Guard

This portrait is most remarkble for showing a small crossbow symbol together with each member.

From flickr.com.

Michael
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Old 26th November 2008, 09:40 PM   #4
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Great illustrations, Matchlock!
Regards

Gonzalo
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Old 26th November 2008, 10:33 PM   #5
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Thanks a lot, Gonzalo,

That's always been my main aim, anyway.

Michael
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Old 27th November 2008, 02:33 PM   #6
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Michael,

These pictures have again opened a window to another age, an age that seems so close,..... though just out of reach!

It is very interesting to see the story of the soldier wounded by the falconet
played out in picture form, and offers us a glimpse of a lifetime lived long ago.
The detailing would appear to be from his actual experience, and add greatly to the interest in the picture.

For the 15th century, some of the paintings are strikingly modern!...and the detail exceptional!

What I find frustrating, is when I see work like this, I want to Experience life In this time period!.......not merely look at it from a distance!!!
(though I'll pass on getting struck by a ball from a falconet!...)

Thank you for posting.

Richard.
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Old 27th November 2008, 02:52 PM   #7
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Richard,

Like you, I have often wished to actually experience life in that far away time period.

On second thought, however, that would not only mean a romantic feeling handling the weapons but some inconveniences like medical and hygienic restrictions, pestilence, plagues etc. as well.

I think we are better off nowadays, treating those ages in academic research.

Thank you so much,

Michael
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Old 27th November 2008, 06:20 PM   #8
Jim McDougall
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That's always been my main aim, anyway.

Michael[/QUOTE]



OK Michael! ..was that a crossbow joke ! Just kidding

Really nice posting, and thank you for explaining the detail, what incredible dimension it adds to appreciating and understanding these fantastic works. I always think it is so interesting to see the weaponry we study in contemporary context, and in a sense is very much like a time machine.

In researching arms and armour its fascinating experiencing them in such context, much as A.V.B.Norman did in using artwork in establishing time periods for hilts, and I have seen the concept used widely in many references. Sometimes it is good to proceed with caution though, as Rembrandt for example, often used then modern weapons in Biblical and earlier historical contexts.

It is interesting also to see the work of Hans Holbein, which brings to mind the relief work on the daggers depicting his "Dance of Death" works, if I am correct (offhand cannot recall which of the two Holbeins did this work).

All the best,
Jim
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Old 27th November 2008, 06:49 PM   #9
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Default The Holbein daggers

Jim,

Thank you so much for writing in such detail and recalling the Holbein daggers.

I must confess being neither an expert in daggers nor in the two Hans Hollbeins but found these on the internet: both portraits are by Hans Holbein d.J. (the Younger).

The first is dated 1533.

Best,
Michael
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Old 27th November 2008, 07:08 PM   #10
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Jim,

Actually my crossbow joke was meant just as ambiguous as you got it, my brilliant friend!

Michael
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Old 4th December 2008, 02:58 PM   #11
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Default Early Crossbow illustrations on East German expiation crosses

Expiation crosses were erected at road sides in the Middle Ages in reconciliation of a bloody deed.

Some of them show early forms of crossbows which had most probably been involved in the crime.

Michael
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Old 27th March 2009, 04:38 PM   #12
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Default An Early 16th Century Crossbow Veneered in White Bone

... featuring a steel bow.

On a painting of the Resurrection by Simon Franck, ca. 1525, in the basilica of Aschaffenburg/Northern Bavaria.

Michael
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Old 27th March 2009, 05:01 PM   #13
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Details.
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