Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > Ethnographic Weapons
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 22nd November 2009, 07:12 PM   #1
Nathaniel
Member
 
Nathaniel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 847
Default What kind of oil do you use for your blades?

Hello all,

I just thought I would toss this out for interest:

What kind of oil/ rust preventative do you use to preserve your blades?

Here are the few different things I've heard of others using....

Clove Oil

Camellia oil

Ballistol

CRC 556

INOX

Tuf Cloth


Feel free to add any thoughts on pros and cons of any...

Thanks,

Nathaniel
Nathaniel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd November 2009, 07:39 PM   #2
KuKulzA28
Member
 
KuKulzA28's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: between work and sleep
Posts: 716
Default

human fat from my head-hunting victims...
I am absolutely no-doubt-about-it serious
I use camelia oil, it's really easy to use, and not expensive.

Last edited by KuKulzA28 : 23rd November 2009 at 01:53 AM.
KuKulzA28 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd November 2009, 07:46 PM   #3
Tim Simmons
Member
 
Tim Simmons's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: England UK.
Posts: 5,248
Default

Human fat! I love it. Cannot beat it. I rub my favourite Oceanic clubs across my bald head. Am I sick?
Tim Simmons is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd November 2009, 08:14 PM   #4
Luc LEFEBVRE
Member
 
Luc LEFEBVRE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: France
Posts: 447
Default

WD40
Attached Images
 
Luc LEFEBVRE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd November 2009, 08:34 PM   #5
Rick
Member
 
Rick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 5,531
Arrow

That's mainly for water displacement .
WD = water displacement 40 = formula # 40, or fortieth try before they got it right .

It is made from modified fish oil .
Do you apply it frequently ?
Rick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd November 2009, 08:45 PM   #6
asomotif
Member
 
asomotif's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 2,000
Default

Quote:
I rub my favourite Oceanic clubs across my bald head. Am I sick?

As long as you "rub" and don't "club" , you should not become sick

This weekend I saw someone rub his NOSE across an brass shield and than start to polish it for the warm glow. So you are not alone.

In the past I have used sewing machine oil, as it has hardly any smell and i easily spread over the surface.
Nowadays I use oil that they sell in bicycle shops to oil your bike and it does pretty much the same, except it smells like oil.

On keris blades that are stored I often apply some acid free vaseline, as oil tends to evaporate, causing you to find a rusty keris blade afte a year or so.
asomotif is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd November 2009, 09:12 PM   #7
Atlantia
Member
 
Atlantia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: The Sharp end
Posts: 2,928
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Luc LEFEBVRE
WD40



Absolutely. Well I tend to use a cheaper mineral oil equivilent from the 'pound shop'.
Clean them good then rub them hard with an aerosol penetrating oil.
Atlantia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd November 2009, 10:24 PM   #8
Luc LEFEBVRE
Member
 
Luc LEFEBVRE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: France
Posts: 447
Default

It works really good, protects metal from rust and corrosion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick
That's mainly for water displacement .
WD = water displacement 40 = formula # 40, or fortieth try before they got it right .

It is made from modified fish oil .
Do you apply it frequently ?
Luc LEFEBVRE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd November 2009, 10:31 PM   #9
Jens Nordlunde
Member
 
Jens Nordlunde's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Europe
Posts: 2,276
Default

When a blade is clean, I normally use solid car wax.
Jens Nordlunde is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd November 2009, 11:25 PM   #10
Gavin Nugent
Member
 
Gavin Nugent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,402
Default Oils

I use WD wonderful for swords, knives and the Harley.
I also use baby oil with good results for the swords too.

Oiling is something that needs to be done often here in QLD as there is a high humidity level and that is bad news when items are left in scabbrds for a long time.

Frequency is another point of discussion that doesn't come up often, what would be considered the right time between oilings relevant to where you live and how you store your collections?

Gav
Gavin Nugent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd November 2009, 11:29 PM   #11
Maurice
Member
 
Maurice's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 1,298
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by asomotif

This weekend I saw someone rub his NOSE across an brass shield and than start to polish it for the warm glow. So you are not alone.

Scary.......I think from now on I first smell at a piece before buying, who knows with what bodypart they rubbed it...

I use ballistol, but it has a typical smell (which I find not disturbing btw).
Maurice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd November 2009, 11:36 PM   #12
Dimasalang
Member
 
Dimasalang's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 264
Default

I use CLP "Collectors". It is thicker and has more rust inhibitors than regular CLP. It is made for long term storage use of collector firearms, but works well on my blades as well. Regular CLP, or any other lube for that matter, will run out or dry out within 2 months...CLP Collectors stays put well beyond 3 months.

I know WD40 is popular, but that stuff is just to stinky for me and attracts way to much dust for my liking.
Dimasalang is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd November 2009, 02:53 AM   #13
ariel
Member
 
ariel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 3,946
Default

Renaissance Wax
ariel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd November 2009, 02:56 AM   #14
ariel
Member
 
ariel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 3,946
Default

And, BTW, I just read on the Internet that a gang was arrested in Peru: they killed people to render human fat and sold it to cosmetic companies at a rate of $15,000 per liter.

Next time you buy Chanel #5 to your wife......
ariel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd November 2009, 04:28 AM   #15
Nathaniel
Member
 
Nathaniel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 847
Default

Great post guys....good to hear what else people are using out there...

Here is the one web link on the Tuf Cloth...I got one as a freebie along with a modern Korean Jingnum http://www.sentrysolutions.com/ It's pretty slick if you have a smooth blade surface...but not so much if you have some corrosion.
Nathaniel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd November 2009, 04:32 AM   #16
kino
Member
 
kino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 672
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ariel
And, BTW, I just read on the Internet that a gang was arrested in Peru: they killed people to render human fat and sold it to cosmetic companies at a rate of $15,000 per liter.

Next time you buy Chanel #5 to your wife......


No need to kill people to obtain human fat. Just hang around the back of a plastic surgeons medical clinic. They probably have bags of human fat just for the asking, it would save them hazzardous waste disposal fees. Think lipo.
kino is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd November 2009, 11:20 AM   #17
M ELEY
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: NC, U.S.A.
Posts: 1,387
Default

Rendered animal fat or lard instead of lipo...still, would the fat go rancid over time? I've use WD or olive oil, just depending on my mood.
M ELEY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd November 2009, 11:57 AM   #18
Spunjer
Member
 
Spunjer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Witness Protection Program
Posts: 1,662
Default

walgreen's mineral oil, once it's stripped off...
wood is Renaissance wax
Spunjer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd November 2009, 12:24 PM   #19
kronckew
Member
 
kronckew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: CSA Consulate, Rm. 101, Glos. UK: p.s. - Real Dogs Have Feathering.
Posts: 2,495
Default

mineral oil (baby oil), with a dollup of vaseline dissolved in it, dash of clove oil for aroma. mineral oil is food safe, most clps and wd40 are not and can be poisonous, and it does not dry like wd40 or olive oil. (i use olive oil on my wood grips, wood axe handles, wood spear shafts, etc. tho).

also like ballistol but it's difficult to get in the UK..

microcrystalline waxes like renaissance wax are also good.
kronckew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd November 2009, 07:40 PM   #20
mross
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 352
Default

Ballistol or Sheath whichever is handy
mross is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd November 2009, 07:48 PM   #21
Tim Simmons
Member
 
Tim Simmons's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: England UK.
Posts: 5,248
Default

[QUOTE=Maurice]Scary.......I think from now on I first smell at a piece before buying, who knows with what bodypart they rubbed it...

Rather you than me, not nice.
Tim Simmons is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th November 2009, 08:58 AM   #22
M ELEY
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: NC, U.S.A.
Posts: 1,387
Default

For dry, damaged hide/leather or wood, like on hilts and scabbards, i find that linseed oil has an amazing way of re-lusturizing (is that even a word- ) the finish. Also works great on old gun stocks...
Anyone else try this product??
M ELEY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th November 2009, 10:06 AM   #23
ericlaude
Member
 
ericlaude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 187
Default oil

I agree, renaissance wax is the most for metal and wood
ericlaude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th November 2009, 08:14 PM   #24
Dimasalang
Member
 
Dimasalang's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 264
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by M ELEY
For dry, damaged hide/leather or wood, like on hilts and scabbards, i find that linseed oil has an amazing way of re-lusturizing (is that even a word- ) the finish. Also works great on old gun stocks...
Anyone else try this product??


Which Linseed do you use? The linseed topic is something I always wanted to bring up here on this forum.
I use "RAW Linseed Oil" on a few of my rifle stocks, and now have started using it on some of my wood handles and scabbards...RLO is NOT the same as "Boiled Linseed Oil". Many frown upon RLO because it takes forever to dry and it darkens wood too much where it effects their color preference, but IMO it looks the best and it is the oil that keeps wood from drying out and cracking. RLO was the original ingredient by most gun manufactures pre-WWII to put on their rifle stocks(priority being to keep them from cracking)...which is also why they have the nicer looking aged stocks that are darker and have greater amount of patina on them compared to post-WWII rifle stocks. BLO on the other hand is popular because it dries fast...but they do contain other chemicals and "dryers", as well as sealers...so BLOs from different manufactures can give different looks and textures. Because of all these chemicals in BLO, some companies that make wood playsets for children went back to natural RLO because some of them felt BLO contained too many chemicals for children to be playing with. Aside from drying faster, the other positive thing about BLO is that it hardens and seals the wood better which holds up better to rain and the elements...which personally I feel can defeat the purpose of getting that aged patina to grow(were not taking these aged artifacts out in the rain or leaving them outside anyways). Sealing wood is something you want to do for outside wood decks that would last about 5-15 maybe 20 years...Im not looking to do this for my wood rifle stocks or scabbards. BLO does better at locking out air and moisture(rain), which also means the wood can still dry out and crack...one big negative for me to not use BLO or any sealer, the wood will take twice as long to develop a patina OR will never develop a patina because oxidation can no longer occur. There is always a great debate around the C&R gun community about what to rub on wood stocks...BLO, RLO, and Tung Oil. Some gun owners have reported to seeing their stocks turn darker and start developing a patina by the 6month of adding RLO to their brand new rifle stocks. None of them stand up well to outdoor environments, but I don't drag my stocks threw storms or assault beaches either...so for me personally, I am aiming for that old aged look, RLO makes the wood look more aged(in my eyes).
Everyone has their own preference to using linseed oil, tung oil, sealers, etc... This is just my own preference/opinion which I know isn't for every body, and Im still learning to take better care of my pieces(thanks to everyone on this forum).
Dimasalang is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2009, 03:26 AM   #25
Dom
Member
 
Dom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Paris (FR*) Cairo (EG)
Posts: 1,142
Default

as oil, I used WD-40
and elbow grease

for cleaning, remove rust or spots
1) emery cloth
2) to smooth the emery marks, steel wool
3) application of metal polish "Briliant" as deep cleaner
4) application of wax polish "Renaissance" to allow manipulation without gloves, and prevent oxydation

I spread inside scabbards WD-40, that feed the wood, or prevent any metal oxydation

+

Dom
Dom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2009, 03:58 AM   #26
M ELEY
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: NC, U.S.A.
Posts: 1,387
Default

I forgot about the raw linseed. I confess that I use the boiled linseed, but only on old, splintery stocks or damaged sheaths to seal their finish better. It works exceptionally well for this. Hmmm, will have to try the raw form sometime just to see the results.
M ELEY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2009, 04:51 AM   #27
A. G. Maisey
Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4,574
Default

For polished bladesI use Renaissance Wax or Antiquax.

For blades with a rough surface like keris and other similar S.E. Asian blades I use a drench of WD40, allowed to dry on the blade followed by a mix of medicinal parrafin, kenanga oil and sandalwood oil.

For long term storage of rough surface blades I sometimes use light machine oil.

Any blade that I intend to store for any length of time is oiled, placed in a plastic sleeve, and stored out of the scabbard. Scabbards are for carry, they are not suited to storage of blades of any type.


Raw linsed oil and patience can work wonders on old cracked wood.
A. G. Maisey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2009, 06:34 AM   #28
kahnjar1
Member
 
kahnjar1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: CHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAND (RISING FROM THE RUBBLE)
Posts: 2,163
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by M ELEY
For dry, damaged hide/leather or wood, like on hilts and scabbards, i find that linseed oil has an amazing way of re-lusturizing (is that even a word- ) the finish. Also works great on old gun stocks...
Anyone else try this product??

Definately Raw Linseed Oil for wood, and although I have not tried it on leather, it should be OK there as well, as it is vegetable , and not chemical based.
As an aside, the old English gunmakers ALWAYS used linseed oil HAND RUBBED to polish up their gunstocks. What you see on those lovely old walnut gunstocks is entirely hand done!
Regards Stu
kahnjar1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2009, 06:48 AM   #29
M ELEY
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: NC, U.S.A.
Posts: 1,387
Default

I knew I had read that somewhere (English gunsmiths using linseed). Thanks, Stu!
OK, so I used boiled, but should be using raw linseed. Now I just have to find some...
M ELEY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2009, 07:48 AM   #30
kahnjar1
Member
 
kahnjar1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: CHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAND (RISING FROM THE RUBBLE)
Posts: 2,163
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by M ELEY
I knew I had read that somewhere (English gunsmiths using linseed). Thanks, Stu!
OK, so I used boiled, but should be using raw linseed. Now I just have to find some...

I don't know that it really matters if it is boiled or not. For Raw Linseed Oil
try a paint merchant (NON acrylic paint contains,or used to contain Linseed Oil) or good hardware shop.
Regards Stu
kahnjar1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT. The time now is 10:31 PM.


Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.