Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > Ethnographic Weapons
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 31st March 2005, 12:59 PM   #1
Mike
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1
Default Help Identify this knife

I found this Forum looking to identify this knife. A friend gave it to me and he thinks his Uncle, who was in the Pacific during WW2 brought it back. Any help or information will be appreciated. I hope the pictures are clear, this is my first time to post....
Attached Images
   

Last edited by Mike : 31st March 2005 at 01:22 PM.
Mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31st March 2005, 03:21 PM   #2
Conogre
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Clearwater, Florida
Posts: 371
Default

Welcome Mike (great name, by the way)
I'm going to be interested in heraing the other responses on this one as I have one that's very similar (the scabbard is not original to the knife, but rather is merely one I had that fits it perfectly).
I've seen these identified as both Philippine talibons and as Javanes labedos and have never thought to seek the opinions of some of our members that are VERY good in both areas.
In either case, I think you've got a beautiful specimen there, so congratulations.
Mike
Attached Images
  
Conogre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31st March 2005, 03:49 PM   #3
Montino Bourbon
Member
 
Montino Bourbon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Santa Barbara, California
Posts: 265
Default

Here's a similar one that I just aquired.
Attached Images
 
Montino Bourbon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31st March 2005, 06:44 PM   #4
Ian
Vikingsword Staff
 
Ian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Little House on the Prairie
Posts: 2,028
Default

I think all three of these knives are from the Eastern Visayas -- Samar, Leyte -- from their general shape and the way the scabbards are constructed. The style of hilt is similar to another one I have that is definitely zoomorphic, much like Montino's example, with two small nails for "eyes."

Be interested to hear from Zel and Shelley about these knives. They strike me as WWII or later.

Ian.
Ian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31st March 2005, 09:13 PM   #5
Battara
EAAF Staff
 
Battara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 5,659
Default

I agree with you Ian. They look like versions of talibons, WWII.
Battara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2nd April 2005, 02:00 AM   #6
Conogre
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Clearwater, Florida
Posts: 371
Default

That was my impression when I got mine, and if so, I'm thrilled, although the "horse hoof" hilt did trouble me somewhat, plus the angle of the blade seemed subtly "off" a trifle compared to other talibons I have and have seen, but here too, there is a tremendous amount of variation among hand made weapons, so that is to be expected.
It was when I ran into the Javanese larbedos that I began to be suspicious and uncertain, with small reservations still remaining.
I can't speak for the other two, by the way, but mine came out of a museum with no origin, only an aquisition date of 1903, while the scabbard, as I said, is one that I had laying around and just happens to fit perfectly, not original to the knife, probably circa WWII.
Mike
Conogre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2nd April 2005, 12:13 PM   #7
zelbone
Member
 
zelbone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: VISAYAS and MINDANAO
Posts: 169
Default

It looks like a small WWII era "talibon" knife to me.

FYI...another name for these little "talibons" is plamenko. I can't remember which dialect this word originates (or even if I spelled it right ) but it's another term I've heard used for these smaller versions of the garab.

Montino's example is probably probably pre-WWII.
zelbone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2nd April 2005, 07:55 PM   #8
Montino Bourbon
Member
 
Montino Bourbon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Santa Barbara, California
Posts: 265
Default

Mine looks to be bigger- blade length 18 1/2 inches, total 22 inches; also quite thick and heavy, thickness at the middle of the back 5/16 inches, more of a sword than a knife.
Montino Bourbon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2nd April 2005, 08:23 PM   #9
tom hyle
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Houston, TX, USA
Posts: 1,254
Default

The hoof (canoe prow? Naga?) handle seems unusual on these; there seems to be so much variation with region/island/time.....it is a style of handle I more usually see on a straighter "sansibar"/espada type blade. I've got one just like Montino's, only with about a 12" blade. I've always liked these; I guess I was country when country wasn't cool or something, but it's not hard when you love every sword you see......Now I'll try to learn this "new" name for the little ones. I think the "chisel ground" blade was more widespread in the past, but has become increasingly localised in the 20th century, but I guess that's mostly just a feeling..........
tom hyle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th April 2005, 03:21 AM   #10
Threetemper
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Oakhurst,NJ
Posts: 14
Default Talibon

I aquired one of these some years ago. I figured it was from Samar because it was carved into the scabbard. Chisel ground and nicely done.
Threetemper is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT. The time now is 10:34 AM.


Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.