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Old 11th February 2016, 10:50 AM   #1
mahratt
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Default Bukhara saber.

Also Bukhara shashkas, which is known to many, interesting Bukhara sabers stored in Russian museums.
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Old 11th February 2016, 12:16 PM   #2
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Old 11th February 2016, 02:13 PM   #3
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Old 11th February 2016, 03:38 PM   #4
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Default Bukhara saber

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Hi Dima ,

Interesting and rare saber.
Thank you for showing us.

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Old 11th February 2016, 04:54 PM   #5
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Yes thank you (picking up eye balls off the floor again ).
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Old 12th February 2016, 04:20 AM   #6
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After the 1917 revolution, the red Soviet commanders are very much appreciated Bukhara saber.
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Old 15th February 2016, 10:22 AM   #7
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Bukhara saber from the Hermitage collection.
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Old 15th February 2016, 10:50 AM   #8
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Here is another not often talked about.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OEVCt1VYNp0

Gavin
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Old 15th February 2016, 12:06 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gavin Nugent
Here is another not often talked about.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OEVCt1VYNp0

Gavin


Nice find.
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Old 15th February 2016, 12:42 PM   #10
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Thank for the great screen dumps...this and one of the finest Kastane are standouts in the series...just dragged it out of the depths of my mind...

Gavin
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Old 15th February 2016, 04:15 PM   #11
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At ~ end of 19th century there was an influx of Daghestani masters to Bukhara.
The Daghestanis brought in new patterns of swords and their famous engraving and chasing techniques, but in exchange learned enameling.

By the beginning of 20th century there were several enameling masters in Kubachi and they also worked in larger centers.

The most famous among them were Tubchiev brothers, but there were others as well. Both Tubchievs died pretty old, in the ~ beginning of 1940s.


The last saber came from the workshop of Guzun Guzunov in Vladikavkaz, but ornamented by one of the Kubachi-based enamelers ( wheter in Kubachi or in situ).
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Old 15th February 2016, 06:30 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ariel
At ~ end of 19th century there was an influx of Daghestani masters to Bukhara.
The Daghestanis brought in new patterns of swords and their famous engraving and chasing techniques, but in exchange learned enameling.

By the beginning of 20th century there were several enameling masters in Kubachi and they also worked in larger centers.

The most famous among them were Tubchiev brothers, but there were others as well. Both Tubchievs died pretty old, in the ~ beginning of 1940s.

The last saber came from the workshop of Guzun Guzunov in Vladikavkaz, but ornamented by one of the Kubachi-based enamelers ( wheter in Kubachi or in situ).


You're right, Ariel.
Jewelled Arts of Uzbekistan of the XIX century is a complex phenomenon in which united local traditions and skills of foreign masters. For example, in 1872 in Bukhara worked jewelers Indians Shangura, Kurdai, Abdullah Jan, 1878 in Tashkent - Indian jewelers Dilbar Marwari and Shahvan Kabli, in 1890 in Tashkent - 'silversmith' Samanshel Chutmaliev, in 1901 mentioned jeweler portal, as well as Persian 'goldsmith'. They came jewelers from the Caucasus - at the end of the XIX century Dagestani Osman Pasha and Badawi, working respectively in Bukhara and Khiva
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