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Old 19th December 2020, 05:37 AM   #31
M ELEY
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Default Stumbled onto this old thread

Speaking of parabolic blades! I'd forgotten this thread until recently...

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...oto_threadtools
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Old 19th December 2020, 04:11 PM   #32
Jim McDougall
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M ELEY
Speaking of parabolic blades! I'd forgotten this thread until recently...

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...oto_threadtools


Wow! Excellent catch Cap'n!!! I forgot it completely but then, thats not unusual for me these days. Thank you so much!
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Old 11th January 2021, 04:25 PM   #33
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Just missed this one at an auction here in the UK a few minutes ago. Went for more than I was willing to pay. Ah, well...maybe next time. Thought it'd fit in here for the record. (I ignore the silly red tassle)
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Old 11th January 2021, 05:36 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kronckew
Just missed this one at an auction here in the UK a few minutes ago. Went for more than I was willing to pay. Ah, well...maybe next time. Thought it'd fit in here for the record. (I ignore the silly red tassle)


Thanks Wayne for the share,
Thats the basic M1796 saber blade, but seems to be with an officers hilt.
These blades were always in tremendous demand, and even after replaced by the M1821/29 blades, were still in use in India and many other countries including North America.

In recent years it has been discovered that these sabers may have even been present in the 'Charge of the Light Brigade' in Oct. 1854.
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Old 14th January 2021, 09:32 PM   #35
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Pipe backed swords can cut a good inch or so before contacting the pipe back. Choice targets would be the neck, head, under the arm, inner thigh etc.
I would believe that an inch deep slash in the neck would be sudfficient to kill.
I have an officers 1821p cavalry sword with original sharpening and I would not wish to be cut with it. I think only bone would slow the blade on contacting the pipe back. I don't think you need to cut deeper to disable your opponent.
Cutting off an head, arm or torso sounds fantastic but is beyond what is required.
I'd like to see period accounts that measure cut depth and who survived and what level of cut and in which locations. There are few accounts of being wounded with a bayonet so many believe there were few bayonet injuries, not the case. Bayonet wounds were mostly fatal and doctors did not waste time observing the dead, only the living.
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Old 15th January 2021, 11:56 AM   #36
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A disabling Wound is far more strategically important. A dead man stops using precious resources. A wounded man keeps using them without depriving the enemy of anything. It ties up about 5 men to look after, move, feed one wounded man, and they need food, equipment and housing as well.

(Historically, a badly wounded man was most likely going to die of complications and/or infection later anyway.)
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Old 16th January 2021, 04:19 AM   #37
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Excellent point, Wayne, and exactly the type of thought process involved with naval fighting/boarding parties. Why kill if you can just take the fight out of them. Just as a surrendered ship was worth more whole than shot to pieces, wounded men can be ransomed or prisoner exchange, might die later of wounds, etc. I'm in the medical field (15 years as a paramedic and 16 as a nurse) and I've seen lots of wounds. Just because a pipeback might only slash an inch or so deep, that is easily enough to lacerate a liver, sever an artery, crack a skull, etc. Just sayin'-
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Old 17th January 2021, 05:50 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M ELEY
...I'm in the medical field (15 years as a paramedic and 16 as a nurse) and I've seen lots of wounds. Just because a pipeback might only slash an inch or so deep, that is easily enough to lacerate a liver, sever an artery, crack a skull, etc. Just sayin'-


I've always wondered how many people in the US cavalry vs. Native American wars of the 19c would have been saved if they'd been issued mail shirts, which DO stop arrows, especially from horse bows, swords & knives, tomahawks such as used by their opponents. they'd do a good job for pipeback sabres too! Especially if they used nice modern steel alloys and all-welded rings.
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