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Old 21st July 2020, 05:59 PM   #31
shayde78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fernando
Thank you Rob.
I take it however that Eneas (Pope Pio II) is the central figure, the one next to the King. I guess the crown (tiara) he wears is a papal exclusive, rather than the bishop miter the person in the back is wearing. Notwithstanding he is holding a patriarchal cross; in this case the subject of my interest ... i confess.
I wonder what is the episode (if in real life) the author depicting. I have tried to translate that four lines 'verse' ... but without success.
.


I think it is the wedding of Eleanor and Fredrick. I found a picture by Pinturicchio (c. 1505) that depicts the same scene. Note the headpiece of Pope Pius.

A very rough initial translation of the stanza below the image (someone else please help!):
Spare the lion king
that reigns in pure humility
And, also ....
the violent is fraught with violence.


Edit - since this is popping up at the top of a new page, I just want to clearly indicate the below image is NOT part of the Chronicle. It is being posted to cross reference representations within the Chronicle.
The below image is painted by Pinturicchio within 10-15 years of the publication of the Chronicle (so, early 16th century)
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Old 21st July 2020, 06:57 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shayde78
I think it is the wedding of Eleanor and Fredrick. I found a picture by Pinturicchio (c. 1505) that depicts the same scene. Note the headpiece of Pope Pius. ...

Because when Frederico and Leonor married (1452) Eneas was still a cardinal; he was only entronized in 1458, right ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by shayde78
... A very rough initial translation of the stanza below the image (someone else please help!):
Spare the lion king
that reigns in pure humility
And, also ....
the violent is fraught with violence

Great, thanks. I could go as far as the 'humility' and 'violence' terms .
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Old 21st July 2020, 08:25 PM   #33
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[QUOTE=fernando]Because when Frederico and Leonor married (1452) Eneas was still a cardinal; he was only entronized in 1458, right ?

Good call - he was not yet Pope when they were married. Here is the caption from Wikipedia for the Pinturicchio painting:
"Eneias Silvio Piccolomini (the future Pope Pius II) celebrating the marriage between Frederick III and Eleanor."
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Old 21st July 2020, 09:54 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by Philip
Two pages up from the first appearance of our Ottoman friend, you can see on the left side something that at a hurried glance might appear to be a dagger, but is actually a socketed spearhead. The actual relic has been preserved in the Hofkammer at Vienna for centuries, it was once the property of the Holy Roman Emperors.

This object, by tradition, is the head of the Roman spear that pierced the side of Christ during the Crucifixion. It has been broken ages ago, and repaired with wire using an iron spike at midpoint, which is held to be one of the nails pulled out of the True Cross. I'll leave it to the experts on ancient Roman military equipment to comment on the historicity of the spearhead's design.

I have read somewhere that in some of the literature, this spearhead has been referred to as the Spear of St. Maurice. Interesting, since in the Armeria Reale di Torino is a sword that is traditionally venerated as La Spada di San Maurizio. St. Mauritius/Moritz/Maurizio was a Roman soldier who lived early in the imperial period, converting to Christianity and being martyred as a result. The sword, unfortunately, does not fit his bio since it is a far cry from a gladius or even a spatha; it is a typical north European knightly sword of late Viking type, Oakeshott Type X. Still well worth a visit if you're in town -- in remarkable condition for one of these, with scabbard and a polychromed fitted wooden case for the whole.


Again, great information. I'm posting below the full page on which the spearhead is depicted, as well as a closer view of the text that I think pertains to the image. Also, I'm including an image of the actual artifact from the museum in Vienna. It is interesting to note the details of the illustration compared to the piece itself.
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Old 22nd July 2020, 07:01 AM   #35
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There was a documentary on History Channel (or similar) about this spear head. If I remember correctly the item is very old but some parts are newer with some potential roman era parts included within. The spear head was needed for political reasons in early medieaval times. Many coveted it through time, including Adolf Hitler.
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Old 22nd July 2020, 03:55 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Victrix
There was a documentary on History Channel (or similar) about this spear head. If I remember correctly the item is very old but some parts are newer with some potential roman era parts included within. The spear head was needed for political reasons in early medieaval times. Many coveted it through time, including Adolf Hitler.


Yes, there was a book written on this which I read, it was over 40 years ago and I remember the title as Spear of Destiny. It presented some fascinating historical info and hypotheses, focusing of course on the role it played with the Nazis. Yes, it is very old since its existence has been recorded for a long time, and its provenance with the Habsburgs, and even prior, is well established. Do you recall which parts of it are alleged to be of Roman origin?
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Old 22nd July 2020, 04:43 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by Philip
Yes, there was a book written on this which I read, it was over 40 years ago and I remember the title as Spear of Destiny. It presented some fascinating historical info and hypotheses, focusing of course on the role it played with the Nazis. Yes, it is very old since its existence has been recorded for a long time, and its provenance with the Habsburgs, and even prior, is well established. Do you recall which parts of it are alleged to be of Roman origin?


”The Museum dates the Lance to the eighth century.[10] Robert Feather, an English metallurgist and technical engineering writer, tested the lance for a documentary in January 2003.[11][14][15] He was given unprecedented permission not only to examine the lance in a laboratory environment, but to remove the delicate bands of gold and silver that hold it together. Based on X-ray diffraction, fluorescence tests, and other noninvasive procedures, he dated the main body of the spear to the 7th century at the earliest[11][15] Feather stated in the same documentary that an iron pin – long claimed to be a nail from the crucifixion, hammered into the blade and set off by tiny brass crosses – is "consistent" in length and shape with a 1st-century A.D. Roman nail.[15] There was no residue of human blood on the lance.[11]
Not long afterward, researchers at the Interdisciplinary Research Institute for Archeology in Vienna used X-ray and other technology to examine a range of lances, and determined that the Vienna Lance dates from around the 8th to the beginning of the 9th century, with the nail apparently being of the same metal, and ruled out a connection with the time of the first century AD.”
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Lance
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