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Old 15th February 2020, 09:53 PM   #31
A. G. Maisey
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Yeah, those things might do the job.
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Old 16th February 2020, 05:56 PM   #32
apolaki
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Hi,

I just wanted to get clarification.

If I clean a keris by scrubbing the blade with citrus dish washing soap and warm/hot water and then dry it thoroughly with hair dryer, will it remove any of the pamor etching?
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Old 16th February 2020, 07:31 PM   #33
A. G. Maisey
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I do not know, Apo.

The idea of "citrus" dish wash liquid is causing me doubt. Another thing is this:- I do not know what country you are living in, I do not know the standards in that country. If "citrus" is an indication that the soap is acidic, this might have some effect on the pamor, but that could just as easily be a positive rather than a negative effect. On the other hand, the "citrus" might simply refer to the smell of the soap.

I don't know.

I'm in Australia, and all I've ever used here has been whatever was on the sink, mostly it would have been something that is supposedly gentle on hands.

I've used the dishwash approach a few times in Indonesia, and frankly I cannot recall what I used, it was just whatever the pembantu had in the kitchen, and it didn't matter if it got rid of the blade stain, because I could easily get it redone, rather than spend time on it myself.
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Old 8th March 2020, 12:40 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jagabuwana
Yes, apply the mineral oil after you have done the WD40 treatments, and once it has completely dried.

Historically, the keris is an object that is dressed and anointed because it was more than just a merely decorative or utilitarian object. Yes the oil does protect it from corrosion but the primary reason for doing so might have been to further beautify and make it elegant to the senses. In the milieu of where the keris originated, it was and is appropriate and encouraged to do so. It is becoming of the blade.

Whether you choose to pay attention to this and go down this road is up to you. Mineral oil on its own (after a WD40 treatments have dried) will do a decent job to protect the blade and you can choose to leave it at that. But I do feel that this blade is quite nice and it would be a shame if it was not wangi (fragrant/perfumed).

I personally would not use any oils that have been mixed with other stuff.

I like to use 50% mineral oil, with 50% sandalwood essential oil. I got my stuff off eBay and it was relatively inexpensive compared to the stuff you can buy off the shelves at hippy shops. To my knowledge, sandalwood is the only scent that is most commonly used in keris oils while also being widely available outside of Indonesia/Java.

Patchouli isn't a scent that I'm familiar with in the context of keris.


I just applied Mineral oil to my keris after a period of letting WD40 set in the keris.

I just noticed that while it says 100% mineral oil, it also says infused with Vitamin E. The mineral oil is very thick.

Did I purchase the wrong type of mineral oil? How does Vitamin E effect the metal.

I am wondering, should just the excel oil into the blade to penetrate into the metal with a cloth until it is dry?
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Old 8th March 2020, 12:56 AM   #35
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Spray with WD40, let it dry off overnight.

Medicinal paraffin or Singer Sewing Machine Oil + fragrant oil, usually sandalwood + kenanga.

Place in a plastic sleeve.

I've been using this approach for around 50 or 60 years, I've recommended it to probably hundreds of people over that time, most of them since I began to use the internet. It works, and gives good long term protection.

Variations from this I cannot comment on because I have not used all possible variations.
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Old 8th March 2020, 11:51 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by apolaki
I just applied Mineral oil to my keris after a period of letting WD40 set in the keris.

I just noticed that while it says 100% mineral oil, it also says infused with Vitamin E. The mineral oil is very thick.

Did I purchase the wrong type of mineral oil? How does Vitamin E effect the metal.

I am wondering, should just the excel oil into the blade to penetrate into the metal with a cloth until it is dry?


I don't think Vit E is going to do anything or react with your blade. Not sure what else is in it though. I wouldn't worry too much but if you're losing sleep over it just wash it again and get a plain mineral oil, or as Alan mentioned, Singer brand machine oil.

As for application just use a small, flat tipped paint brush to give it a light coat.
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Old 8th March 2020, 07:51 PM   #37
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Well, you know, the vitamin E oil in there will probably help heal all these battle scars. LOL!
But seriously, pure mineral oil (medicinal variety) is the same thing as medical paraffin. Sounds like you got one that is meant for topical skin application. probably won't hurt your blade, but you might want to get some of the pure stuff for future uses. As Alan suggests, i generally mix in a little sandalwood and kenanga oils. I also brush on with a paint brush, enough t fully cover all surface areas.
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Old 15th June 2020, 11:10 AM   #38
Mickey the Finn
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Default Re: Plastic sleeves, mineral oil, minyak pusaka.

This brings to mind images of several different kinds, none of which necessarily are the type of plastic sleeve you're talking about. I'd hazard a guess that something like the heat-shrink tubing sometimes used on electrical leads, or chains exposed to the elements, might be close to what you mean.
Minyak cendana, mawar, dan melati, as per Mpu Djeno's instructions, mixed with mineral oil is what I've been using. Since the Mpu did not specify any ratio, I'm still working on it, and leaning toward more melati, less mawar.
On a related note: the minyak known as "Seribu Bunga"...is it anything like the style of perfume called a "flower bomb"? Does anyone have any specific information about the formulation of "Seribu Bunga", or it's dominant floral notes? Or is it just a catchall term for a "flower bomb"?

Last edited by Mickey the Finn : 15th June 2020 at 11:33 AM. Reason: Additional information.
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Old 16th June 2020, 07:59 AM   #39
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Seribu bunga means one thousand flowers so it should be a mix of many flower extracts/ essential oils
Regards
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