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Old 1st November 2019, 05:48 PM   #1
Cerjak
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Default Please Help with this maker mark on Spanish blunderbuss

I'm looking for informations about this maker ?
Thank you all in advance for your time and help
Kind regards,
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Old 2nd November 2019, 05:00 AM   #2
Philip
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The name is Pérez, but I can find no listing for that surname in the directories of Spanish makers in the Neal and Lavin books, which admittedly are not encyclopedic as these were pioneering efforts by English-language scholars. Der Neue Stoeckel does not contain the name either (not to be confused with several entries for Peres which is Portuguese).

Your gun was likely made in the Eibar / Guipúzcoa region, in the western foothills of the Pyrenees. The lock is stylistically consistent with products from the area, which is known for production of a good number of blunderbusses well into the percussion period. Eibar, in a part of Spain known for the quality of its iron and the skill of its metalworkers, is even today the seat of Spain's sporting arms trade. It became pre-eminent after the demise of the royal patronage of Madrid gunmakers, and after successive destructions of the Ripoll arms industry by the French culminating with its utter liquidation in 1839 during the Carlist Wars.

I find something very interesting about the engraved décor of the lock. There are volutes cut into the face of the bridle or support for the hammer pivot screw, these "curlicues" terminate in shapes like the fiddleheads of fern shoots. This particular decorative element is a distinguishing hallmark of Brescian decoration, seen as early as the 17th cent. in northern Italy and it can be seen for the next century on the products of central Italian gunsmiths, as craftsmen from Brescia migrated southward through the Papal States to promote their livelihood. The interchange of design elements between Ripoll and Brescia in the 17th cent. is due not only to trans-Mediterranean trade, but also Spanish rule in Lombardy during that era.

Intriguing that this one little element, like the stalk of a fern sprouting in the forest, is still visible on a Spanish gun produced almost two centuries after those events.
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Old 2nd November 2019, 04:45 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Philip
The name is Pérez, but I can find no listing for that surname in the directories of Spanish makers in the Neal and Lavin books, which admittedly are not encyclopedic as these were pioneering efforts by English-language scholars. Der Neue Stoeckel does not contain the name either (not to be confused with several entries for Peres which is Portuguese).

Your gun was likely made in the Eibar / Guipúzcoa region, in the western foothills of the Pyrenees. The lock is stylistically consistent with products from the area, which is known for production of a good number of blunderbusses well into the percussion period. Eibar, in a part of Spain known for the quality of its iron and the skill of its metalworkers, is even today the seat of Spain's sporting arms trade. It became pre-eminent after the demise of the royal patronage of Madrid gunmakers, and after successive destructions of the Ripoll arms industry by the French culminating with its utter liquidation in 1839 during the Carlist Wars.

I find something very interesting about the engraved décor of the lock. There are volutes cut into the face of the bridle or support for the hammer pivot screw, these "curlicues" terminate in shapes like the fiddleheads of fern shoots. This particular decorative element is a distinguishing hallmark of Brescian decoration, seen as early as the 17th cent. in northern Italy and it can be seen for the next century on the products of central Italian gunsmiths, as craftsmen from Brescia migrated southward through the Papal States to promote their livelihood. The interchange of design elements between Ripoll and Brescia in the 17th cent. is due not only to trans-Mediterranean trade, but also Spanish rule in Lombardy during that era.

Intriguing that this one little element, like the stalk of a fern sprouting in the forest, is still visible on a Spanish gun produced almost two centuries after those events.

Thank you philips for this pertinent remark about the Brescian style perpetuated into the face of the bridle.
Best
Jean-Luc
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Old 14th November 2019, 11:54 AM   #4
Fernando K
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Hi Cerjak

In Ramiro Larrañaga's book, "Historical synthesis of the Basque armory", page 266 is the mention:

PEREZ MUÑOZ, Simon Armero of Madrid, 1850.. Its source is Felix Alfaro Fournier, Director of the Armeria Museum in Vitoria.

That's it. Affectionately
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Old 14th November 2019, 12:10 PM   #5
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Hi Cerjak

Now that I have paid more attention, I notice that the lock comes from a spark transformation, from a classic miquelete. On the right side, above, the hole (covered) for the rake is observed, and under the massacre of the chimney the limits of the primitive, square bowl. Without a doubt, looking inside the lock you can see the signs of the transformation. The profile of the plate is that of a classic miquelete.

Sorry for the translator. Affectionately
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Old 14th November 2019, 12:25 PM   #6
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Miquelete lock
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Old 14th November 2019, 12:33 PM   #7
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Hello

... and the stock is "a la madrileña" ....

Affectionately
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Old 14th November 2019, 01:33 PM   #8
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Hello

..... and behind the rectangle that marks the limits of the primitive bread it seems to me to observe the hole (covered) that corresponded to the fixing of the bridle (false) of the rake or steel. We would have to look inside the lock to see this

Affectionately
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Old 14th November 2019, 02:30 PM   #9
Cerjak
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Dear Fernando

Thank you for your comment on this Blunderbuss.
there is no doubt that this miquelet lock has been converted into percussion
There is not doubt that this moquelet look had been converted into percution.
About PEREZ MUÑOZ of Madrid, 1850 ,because of the date he could be the gunsmith who made this convertion.
Best
Jean-Luc
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