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Old 1st May 2019, 06:44 PM   #61
Jim McDougall
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Excellent examples of the South Arabian (Yemen/Hadhramaut) styling and of course the variation of the hilt, yet with the distinguishing 'hand nock' on the inside of the grip which seems to ideally denote 'nimcha'.

While obviously we are deviating from Charles' sword in the original post in degree, it is interesting to examine the spectrum of styling in these Mediterranean swords which are typically associated with Algeria.

The development of the form from 15th century Italian hilt styles, and blades evolving as well from Italian stortas and European falchions also provides dimension in understanding the dynamics and context in which Charles outstanding example originated and clearly held importance.

I think this Somali connected topic as well as others which have come up in examining Charles' nimcha are well worthy of their own threads to be discussed further. I never had heard of this Somalian kingdom either! but its fascinating to see the world this nimcha lived in !!!
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Old 22nd September 2023, 07:20 PM   #62
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Default Algerian, Yemen sabre?

Hi,

What do you think about the attached saber?
Seems that it may come from Algeria, or Yemen... for me it looks like more from Yemen (hilt type) based on other posts:

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=15790
http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=21833

Blade is polished and was engraved (not much has survived).
Blade quality seems to be good. Maybe older than hilt and scabbard..

Would appreciate more information about the origin/age
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Old 23rd September 2023, 03:42 PM   #63
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Thank you for sharing qusko. Yes, I agree with you that this is an older European blade that was originally mounted on an Algerian nimcha that was later remounted in Yemen.
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Old 23rd September 2023, 08:41 PM   #64
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This blade does seem like those seen in 'Mediterranean' swords which seem like the flared tip curved types (as mentioned in Elgood, as well as "Arts of the Muslim Knight", which I do not have on hand).

I am not sure this blade would be European with the spines in the blade back (at least in those I am familiar with), and while European hatchet point blades (incl British M1796) have radiused points, the flare and curve are not this dramatic. Whatever the case, this example has a resemblance to the example attached.
Question: the turquoise and coral decoration does seem popular in Algeria, did Yemeni armorers use this affectation as well? The mounts do seem Yemeni.
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Old 24th September 2023, 03:37 AM   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qusko View Post
Hi,

What do you think about the attached saber?
Seems that it may come from Algeria, or Yemen... for me it looks like more from Yemen (hilt type) based on other posts:

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=15790
http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=21833

Blade is polished and was engraved (not much has survived).
Blade quality seems to be good. Maybe older than hilt and scabbard..

Would appreciate more information about the origin/age
Mounts are definitely Yemeni work. Those blades, including on nimchas, seem to have been present in Yemen in large numbers and can come on a variety of swords including 'karabelas' and other types.
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Old 24th September 2023, 10:17 AM   #66
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Question: the turquoise and coral decoration does seem popular in Algeria, did Yemeni armorers use this affectation as well? The mounts do seem Yemeni.
Jim,
Not sure about coral and turquoise, but there is also decoration in red stones (carnelian). I've found Gusbi Jambiya from Yemen with similar decoration.

https://oriental-arms.com/product/tr...om-hadhramaut/
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Old 24th September 2023, 10:21 AM   #67
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Those blades, including on nimchas, seem to have been present in Yemen in large numbers and can come on a variety of swords including 'karabelas' and other types.
Seems blade can be from XVII.
Do you have any suggestions about hilt/scabbard age? - XIX, earlier?
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Old 24th September 2023, 03:03 PM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qusko View Post
Jim,
Not sure about coral and turquoise, but there is also decoration in red stones (carnelian). I've found Gusbi Jambiya from Yemen with similar decoration.

https://oriental-arms.com/product/tr...om-hadhramaut/

Thank you for the response Qusko! I had forgotten about those,and this really is an attractive saber, I like this type decoration.
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Old 24th September 2023, 05:01 PM   #69
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Seems blade can be from XVII.
Do you have any suggestions about hilt/scabbard age? - XIX, earlier?
I've seen similar work that looks like its made yesterday. I think its 20th century, and leaning more towards the other half.
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Old 27th September 2023, 04:43 AM   #70
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I am not sure this blade would be European with the spines in the blade back (at least in those I am familiar with), and while European hatchet point blades (incl British M1796) have radiused points, the flare and curve are not this dramatic.
Jim, you are bringing up some interesting questions. I have three blades that could be classified as nimchas, and while they have different hilts from Morocco, Algeria and Yemen there are some similarities in the blades. I took some quick pictures. All three blades have a spine with a groove. The two larger blades also have European marks or copies thereof. I suspect that they are therefore at the very least copies of European blades.
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Old 28th September 2023, 02:21 AM   #71
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Jim, you are bringing up some interesting questions. I have three blades that could be classified as nimchas, and while they have different hilts from Morocco, Algeria and Yemen there are some similarities in the blades. I took some quick pictures. All three blades have a spine with a groove. The two larger blades also have European marks or copies thereof. I suspect that they are therefore at the very least copies of European blades.
Teodor, you have in kind brought up interesting perspective with these fascinating examples. When I noted 'European' blades, I had not thought of Styrian or for that matter Italian blades, which the one in the center resembles (the center one looks like a storta type).
The top one with remarkably flared blade, Yemeni hilt, brings to mind the fanciful European term 'scimitar', and if it has a European mark it seems likely copied.
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Old 28th September 2023, 07:36 PM   #72
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The Yemeni hilted nimcha has no markings. This type of blade, with a large yelman seems to have been quite popular with Barbary pirates. The Grand Master's Palace Armory in Malta has a collection of swords taken from Barbary pirates and many of them have similar blades. I suspect at least a portion of them were made in Europe.
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Old 29th September 2023, 04:35 AM   #73
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. I suspect at least a portion of them were made in Europe.
An interesting subject. There were sword blade of similar size and style also seen in Ethiopia, they were however dressed in their traditional hilts and sheaths. I think I may still have one here of British manufacture.
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