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Old 16th July 2017, 03:41 PM   #1
chiefheadknocker
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Default SOLOMON ISLAND CLUB ,OPINIONS PLEASE

This Solomon island club is a recent buy , its quite large at 73 cm , a supe club I believe ,it shows some good age , any information on these clubs would be welcome
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Old 17th July 2017, 11:08 AM   #2
Tim Simmons
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I am very keen on Solomon Island clubs such beautiful forms. I feel they have an elegance that is not found in Fijian or Samoan clubs. I have this example 76cm long.

Here is an extract from ( Melanesia: Art and Encounter. The British Museum Press. 2013. Chapter 39 Malaita clubs. David Akin)

The two clubs most characteristic of Malaita Island are Subi and Alafolo, though both are also known on other Islands. Subi ( Supi in South Malaita ) is a lozenge shaped club now in the insignia of the Malaita Provincial Government. The invention of particular kinds of clubs, even those made across Malaita for generations, is usually attributed to specific area in the distant past, and Kwaio say that the first Subi was made by a man named Siunaele, from Sibe'a in Kwara'ae, using his sister's erect clitoris as a model. A similar tale is told North Malaita. Subi are called by a dozen euphemisms in Kwaio, and due to the clubs sexual connotations men are forbidden to carry them to primary regulated courtship rendezvous. Subi vary in proportions and size. Some are as short as two feet ( short Subi are described as Ributoru ) and a reliable source told me that when young he saw one over five feet long consercrated to ancestors ( the biggest Subi are Kwarilobe'ewane). Most Subi have raised edges forming a cross in the centre of the head. Such ridges on any club are called Suri'iuu, or " Lamprey spine". Some have only one ridge , a style Kwaio attributed to Kwara'ae, or none at all, and a few have incited designs. The hooked butt (La'ona) prevents the weapon from being pulled from the hand. The Subi handle (Kaaka'ina) is wrapped in cord, sometimes with a wrist loop. Some have a row of cone shell rings (Tale'esirikuma) tied to the top of the binding, and some say these represented secret killings. Such rings also hung on wa'ifiruna trophy bags to denote such killings. Subi were favoured weapons for raiding hamlets, as they could be held over the head as a shield when ducking through small doorways. They are also fine close-guarters weapons, striking swinging blows with angular edges (du'udu'una) and backhand or downwards blows with the butt.

Mine is 18cm wide, could certainly shield my face and forehead if I were to go through a small hut entrance.
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Last edited by Tim Simmons : 17th July 2017 at 03:00 PM.
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Old 29th July 2017, 09:56 AM   #3
TomHurstAntiques
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This has a lovely patination and the wood is a great dark colour.
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Old 7th February 2018, 03:46 PM   #4
fireiceviper
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Chiefheadknocker, that is a wonderfull example of this type of club! good job! exactly how you want them to be!
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