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Old 8th October 2017, 04:09 PM   #1
CharlesS
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Default Perhaps the World's Ugliest Nimcha, but Still Quite Interesting

This nimcha will win few awards for aesthetics, but it may illustrate for us how the nimcha became such a prestige weapon that it was copied by some tribal societies further to the south of it Moroccan origins.

The sword has a hammered blade that is quite crude, with forging flaws aplenty. Note the central fuller has been "hammered in" rather than "chiseled out." The hilt is wood with, form fitted for the hand, and inlaid with brass wire typical to other hilts of the Maghreb. The guard may have been bought or traded for, as it is clearly the finest piece of ironwork on the weapon. The handguard is crude but elegant in its own right.

The sword was fitted with a Manding style scabbard once complete with all the tassels and trappings, but those have all been carefully removed, with only the attaching buttons remaining. My own humble theory is that a Manding style baldric would have been too short and made the long sword too difficult to retrieve from an underarm position. Most Moroccan nimchas have their baldrics mounted to opposite sides of the scabbard mouth's locket, for much easier retrieval of a long sword. This is why I believe the manding style baldric was removed in favor of perhaps fitting the sword through a belt.

Observations and comments are welcomed!

Dimensions:

Overall length: 39in.
Blade length: 33.33in.
Widest point of the blade: 1.5in.
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Last edited by CharlesS : 8th October 2017 at 08:03 PM.
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Old 8th October 2017, 05:16 PM   #2
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Not my area, but I am not sure it should be called nimcha. Looks like a Tuareg of other Saharan straight sword with some nimcha and other Moroccan features. A Berber mix. Does not mean it is not authentic, just not a nimcha.
By the way, I son't think it is that ugly
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Old 8th October 2017, 06:01 PM   #3
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Well, Charles, you ARE high maintenance!

Is Kate Upton just “OK” on your scale?

Motan, I am with you: this is a charming “dog’s breakfast”. I like it. I would still call it a nimcha: if Karud is good enough , this should pass the test:-)
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Old 8th October 2017, 07:37 PM   #4
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlesS
This nimcha will win few awards for aesthetics, but it may illustrate for us how the nimcha became such a prestige weapon that it was copied by some tribal societies further to the south of it Moroccan origins.

The sword has a hammered blade that is quite crude, with forging flaws aplenty. Note the central fuller has been "hammered in" rather than "chiseled out." The hilt is wood with, form fitted for the hand, and inlaid with brass wire typical to other hilts of the Maghreb. The guard may have been bought or traded for, as it is clearly the finest piece of ironwork on the weapon. The handguard is crude but elegant in its own right.

The sword was fitted with a Manding style scabbard once complete with all the tassels and trappings, but those have all been carefully removed, with only the attaching buttons remaining. My own humble theory is that a Manding style baldric would have been too short and made the long sword to difficult to retrieve from an underarm position. Most Moroccan nimchas have their baldrics mounted to opposite sides of the scabbard mouth's locket, for much easier retrieval of a long sword. This is why I believe the manding style baldric was removed in favor of perhaps fitting the sword through a belt.

Observations and comments are welcomed!

Dimensions:

Overall length: 39in.
Blade length: 33.33in.
Widest point of the blade: 1.5in.



Its a Nimcha but with all the ingredients you mention. A great old brute !!
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Old 8th October 2017, 08:14 PM   #5
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Thanks for the input guys!

Ariel, I meant "ugliest" in the "kindest, gentlest, most nurturing way".
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Old 9th October 2017, 05:38 AM   #6
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Maybe border-line but still a Nimcha.

I find this sword exceptional because it is a genuine representation of a local tradition. Moreover, as opposed to the majority of the classic Nimchas that are fitted with European blades, this one has an obviously hand forged locally made blade, making the sword even more valuable.

Thank you for sharig!
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Old 9th October 2017, 04:26 PM   #7
Kubur
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You know what?
I think it's a karud.
More seriously, it's a nice and ugly sword.
The nimcha are not nimcha, so i don't think it's a problem to call it nimcha...
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Old 11th October 2017, 02:36 AM   #8
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She is gorgeous!
Being able to see each blow of the hammer that coaxed a blade out of metal is like seeing the brush strokes of a painter on an old canvas. Sure, a photograph is a cleaner representation of the subject matter, but you can sense an artist's personality in less refined works. I'm reminded of a trip to the Van Gogh museum-totally different from seeing the same works printed in a book.
Thanks for posting this eye candy.
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Old 11th October 2017, 10:03 AM   #9
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I agree with the others in the aesthetics of this piece. Shall we call it 'tribal folk art?" Like it either way!
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Old 11th October 2017, 01:10 PM   #10
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Nothing ugly on this one!!
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Old 11th October 2017, 03:01 PM   #11
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Thank you all for your kind words and observations. I meant "ugly" in the most humble way....were it truly "ugly" I doubt I would make room for it. I just find it a very interesting tribal interpretation of a nimcha. Its crude characteristics are what make it alluring.
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