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Old 9th September 2017, 04:28 PM   #1
chiefheadknocker
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Default ivory handle burmese? sword for id and discussion please

I have recently acquired this sword unfortunately it is missing the scabbard , I think its Burmese ,there is a mark on the blade maybe this will point to where it originates , I am a novice in this area and any info would be much appretiated
thanks

total length 84cm
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Last edited by chiefheadknocker : 9th September 2017 at 05:19 PM.
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Old 9th September 2017, 08:20 PM   #2
Sajen
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Hello Chiefheadknocker,

no, it's not a Burmese dha but a Lao daab, border Northern Thai. It has a Hua Bua tip. This Hua Bua tips are for pushing inside the arm of the enemy with which he hold his own sword so that he can't hold it anymore. The scabbard was a simple one like the one in the picture, both swords has been in possession of a good friend of mine. The mark on your sword was used by Laos, Northern Thai and Lanna daabs. Very nice sword by the way!

Regards,
Detlef
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Old 9th September 2017, 09:03 PM   #3
chiefheadknocker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sajen
Hello Chiefheadknocker,

no, it's not a Burmese dha but a Lao daab, border Northern Thai. It has a Hua Bua tip. This Hua Bua tips are for pushing inside the arm of the enemy with which he hold his own sword so that he can't hold it anymore. The scabbard was a simple one like the one in the picture, both swords has been in possession of a good friend of mine. The mark on your sword was used by Laos, Northern Thai and Lanna daabs. Very nice sword by the way!

Regards,
Detlef


hi detlef,
thanks for your reply and information , this forum is great to get expert advice from people like yourself .
many thanks,
chief
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Old 9th September 2017, 09:13 PM   #4
Sajen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiefheadknocker
hi detlef,
thanks for your reply and information , this forum is great to get expert advice from people like yourself .
many thanks,
chief



Hi Chief,

I've got many help in the past at this place and I am happy that I can help now others!

Best regards,
Detlef
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Old 10th September 2017, 04:54 AM   #5
kahnjar1
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Default Look here......

This might also be of interest http://dharesearch.bowditch.us/
Go to "Sword Index" section. If you click on the images you will get a description of each.
Stu
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Old 10th September 2017, 05:32 PM   #6
Ian
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Hi CHK:

I'm sorry I'm coming to this a little late.

I agree with Detlef that your sword is N. Thai/Lao in origin and from the Rattanakosin period, maybe early to mid-19th C. I have a similar, hua bua tipped sword from the early Rattanakosin period (as dated from the silverwork on the scabbard)--pictures below. The hua bua tip is based on the shape of the lotus bud, and there are many variations. As you can see, the tip on mine is a little different from yours, but the purpose was similar. There are martial arts techniques that employed this tip to inflict a painful jab to the sword hand or arm of an opponent, temporarily distracting him and allowing a slashing blow to a more vital structure. These swords were intended mainly for close hand fighting, including indoors, and were sometimes used by bodyguards specifically trained in the use of this particular sword.

Ian.


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Old 10th September 2017, 09:18 PM   #7
chiefheadknocker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian
Hi CHK:

I'm sorry I'm coming to this a little late.

I agree with Detlef that your sword is N. Thai/Lao in origin and from the Rattanakosin period, maybe early to mid-19th C. I have a similar, hua bua tipped sword from the early Rattanakosin period (as dated from the silverwork on the scabbard)--pictures below. The hua bua tip is based on the shape of the lotus bud, and there are many variations. As you can see, the tip on mine is a little different from yours, but the purpose was similar. There are martial arts techniques that employed this tip to inflict a painful jab to the sword hand or arm of an opponent, temporarily distracting him and allowing a slashing blow to a more vital structure. These swords were intended mainly for close hand fighting, including indoors, and were sometimes used by bodyguards specifically trained in the use of this particular sword.

Ian.


.



Hi ian, thanks for your valuable information , I can imagine its a great sword for close hand fighting the sword has quite a curve and is razor sharp , when I first acquired it I wondered if it was was more of a dress type sword ,I don't know how often swords came into use in the 19th century ,I daresay life could of been quite violent and brutal ,
thanks
chn
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Old 11th September 2017, 03:23 PM   #8
Ian
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiefheadknocker
Hi ian, thanks for your valuable information , I can imagine its a great sword for close hand fighting the sword has quite a curve and is razor sharp , when I first acquired it I wondered if it was was more of a dress type sword ,I don't know how often swords came into use in the 19th century ,I daresay life could of been quite violent and brutal ,
thanks
chn

Swords in these areas were in common fighting use during the 19th C, especially before the introduction of firearms, and were used in combat and village raids well into the late 19th and early 20th C. Various unadorned dha/daab have always been used for non-combat purposes as well—such as brush clearing, cutting firewood, slaughtering animals, etc—and those uses continue up to the present.

Your example is clearly a prestige weapon, with its ivory and silver hilt, designed as much for show as for combat. The blade looks good quality and, as you say, it is razor sharp.
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