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Old 24th May 2018, 06:23 PM   #1
chiefheadknocker
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Default unusual tulwar /pulwar with straight blade

I recently picked this sword up , at first thinking its a tulwar but after researching it seems the pommel is more like a pulwar I'm confused ,also most of these swords ive seen have curved blades , this one looks very old to ,any info would be very welcome
thanks
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Old 24th May 2018, 06:58 PM   #2
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Actually it's Sumatran or Malayan Chenangkas, much more rare then Pulwar. There are some threads if you search for it.
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Old 24th May 2018, 10:06 PM   #3
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Indian swords with straight blade are well-known: firangi, dhup etc.
Re . the present one:
How do we know that it is Malayan/Sumatran and not Indian with a cup-like pommel characteristic of 16-17 century or earlier ?
These are illustrated in Hamzaname ( Jens has the pic and kindly sent me a copy, but it was lost after my computer crashed) and in Elgood's book on Hindu arms and ritual ( p.128)

Here are 3 of mine.
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Old 24th May 2018, 10:13 PM   #4
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Sorry, forgot this one
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Old 25th May 2018, 03:28 PM   #5
Jens Nordlunde
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Ariel, well seen and well remembered - p. 128 in Elgoods book:-).
Nice show of old swords. I think most collectors go for gold/silver decorated items, and so did I when I started collecting, but now I go more for older, undecorated weapons - ozing of history:-).

I too think the sword is Indian, and Mughal/Deccan. If I am correct it is likely to be quite old.
How long is the sword/blade? The blade, of which only the hilt is shown in Elgood's book is 33 in., and the blade is European - it is not mentioned if the blade is straight or curved.
These hilts came to Sri Lanka, Sumatra, the Malayan peninsula and other places when the Indians, in earlier times started to colonize these places.
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Old 26th May 2018, 02:38 AM   #6
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Jens,

Thanks a lot!

It is gratifying to know there are still people valuing history above the "bling"

Can you post the pic from Hamzaname that you sent me once ( and that was regretfully lost somewhere in the third dimension)?

And, BTW, old Hindu tulwar handle with a cup pommel mutated into Sumatran Piso Podang/Chenangkas just as Hindu Gulabhati handle mutated into Hulu Meu Apet
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Old 26th May 2018, 08:04 AM   #7
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Thanks for putting some light on this sword , thought I would mention that the blade is quite thin and very flexible ,
the blade length is 69 cm and total length with hilt 80cm
shame there is no scabbard though
thanks everyone
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Old 26th May 2018, 09:03 AM   #8
Jens Nordlunde
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Ariel,
I dont remember which picture I sent you, but here are a few from Hamza.
It seems as if only two hilt forms were used, and notice in the picture showing many weapons, in the top left corner two of the swords have a hand guard. I dont remember tto have seen other swords with a hand guard in Hamza.
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Old 26th May 2018, 10:57 AM   #9
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Great!!!
Many thanks!
This is a wonderful reference for this and future discussions.
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Old 26th May 2018, 08:14 PM   #10
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Yes, the Hamza is very important if you want to study Indian weapons, beiing from the 16th century, and it shows a lot of different wepons, besides from telling a very special story.
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