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Old 20th August 2015, 06:39 PM   #1
fernando
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Default Censoring the length of haquebuts

This is somehow ironical.
More than once discussions have taken place about the length of swords, the Kings having to issue severe laws to limit their dimensions.
Now we find that, with portable firearms, was the other way round.
Here is a law published in 1557, under King Dom Sebastião rule, in which haquebuts could not be shorter than two palms in barrel. Offenders were passive of terrible penalties, including floging, condemnation to the Royal galleys or permanent exile to Brazil, depending on their social 'quality'.
The law acknowledges that, there are persons circulating in the Kings lands with small haquebuts and, their intentions being the practice of crimes and offenses, bringing the said haquebuts hidden, they will easier be able to do it.

(Collection Rainer Daehnhardt).

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Old 20th August 2015, 07:56 PM   #2
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Hi Nando,


I did know the story, but never saw actual proof of it. Great job!
For the occasion i wip out this picture of a rather short swivel gun, just for the fun of it. Its location is the newly opened army museum in The Netherlands. They have a few more interesting firearms as well.

The gun is no more than 30-40 cm (including the tiller). Its actuall intend or place of usage is not known.
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Old 20th August 2015, 08:41 PM   #3
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Where does one conceal the lit match ?
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Old 20th August 2015, 08:48 PM   #4
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These concealable firearms where most likely equiped with a wheellock mechanism. And depending on who you ask (time period migjt differ), a gun like the monks gun could have done the job.
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Old 20th August 2015, 09:03 PM   #5
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Ah, thank you Marcus .
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Old 21st August 2015, 09:48 AM   #6
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Remember the Zippo principle, Rick ? .


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Old 23rd August 2015, 11:39 AM   #7
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Here are the steps to arm a wheellock gun, extracted from a recent movie.
First the hero pushes forwards the striker harm which holds the flint, followed by the winding of the striking wheel (can you hear the sound?). Finally the striking arm is pulled back to the flash pan and is ready for action.
We can see the hero is not in a hurry, but he actually ends up not carrying with the execution... as heroes should be

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vfU...eature=youtu.be
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Old 25th August 2015, 05:21 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcus den toom
Hi Nando,


I did know the story, but never saw actual proof of it. Great job!
For the occasion i wip out this picture of a rather short swivel gun, just for the fun of it. Its location is the newly opened army museum in The Netherlands. They have a few more interesting firearms as well.

The gun is no more than 30-40 cm (including the tiller). Its actuall intend or place of usage is not known.

My example dated 1450 is a bit longer: 43 cms. with its tiller cut off ... go figure why.

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Old 25th August 2015, 05:59 PM   #9
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I absolutely love that tiller gun of yours, do you know where it was from?
Did you post it in a thread yet?
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Old 25th August 2015, 06:07 PM   #10
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