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Old 22nd January 2016, 01:14 PM   #181
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
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Default The Al Wusta Khanjar.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard G
Thank you for this link Ibrahim. It is very inreesting.
Do you know whose site it is?
Regards
Richard



Salaams Richard G ...No idea ...I thought it was Government inspired... but I can find no source. Al Wusta is a newly introduced region inside the last 2 years in Oman...The old boundaries are reformatted making the historical trace difficult but it can be seen that the major sea port way back through antiquity was Sur...long the sealink with the south including Red Sea Regions and Zanzibar etc.

Where the penny drops is on its style linking it/the Royal Khanjar and the Habaabi (of Abha) Red Sea (Yemen now Saudia ) style...down to the UUUUUUU decoration above the belt and the more curved Scabbard and Hilt and Scabbard style. The key factor is the close proximity to the important Slave and Ivory port of Sur in the 19th C and before. The major difference now between Asir/Habaabi Flower men Khanjar type and Omani is the Yemeni makers signature and floral etching often placed on the back of that Yemeni form..now part of Saudia...since 1923...but steeped in darkness for about 30 years after that.

I have to say that this new website removes a shroud of misunderstanding upon all those issues.

Please see http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...t=omani+khanjar which shows Flower Tribe stamps of the maker plus...the form and the similarity in style with the Al Wusta Khanjar...The transmission being via Sur .

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.

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Old 22nd January 2016, 02:58 PM   #182
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harrywagner
Hello Ibrahiim,
Thank you for this post. I think I bought one of these last year. Photos attached. I purchased it used. The knife has been used, although it is in excellent condition. The blade has been mistreated but I can fix that. I like it. I like it a lot. There is nothng cheap about it. Granted it is not an antique but I can live with that. If I am not mistaken there is a photo in Mr. Gracie's book of one. I don't have the book with me right now but can provide the page number later today if you or anyone else would like the reference. Thanks again for the post. It is interesting to me to see how they are made. Not to mention seeing these incredible knives!

Harry


Salaams harrywagner ... I like the Khanjar. A lot of people may confuse the concept of making new khanjars... They make these weapons now for the same reasons they made them scores or hundreds of years ago as a badge of office ...head of the Omani household ...and a tradition handed down through the ages. It is therefor Iconic ...an emblem of Oman. In a hundred years yours will be an antique but even then new Khanjars will be being made in the time honoured way and by hand.
Yours is an excellent high quality item... as you say some blade wear or damage which is easy to fix...or to get a refitted blade. The point being that the weapon is constructed so any part of it can be replaced... So you could transform it in minutes to an al Busaidi simply by changing the hilt...I would say this one has what we can say is a new hilt in high density carbon... and fitted to look like Ivory...I see nothing wrong with that at all...The design is what we call eyes of the Bedouin...and in what we also call the Baatinah (coastal) style with silver stitching all over the scabbard below its belt.

There is a similar style at http://khanjar.om/Parts.html See the Types...I read it as agreeing with Omani coastal Baatinah form. The composite hilt with silver pins easily placed without splitting.

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.

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Old 22nd January 2016, 09:19 PM   #183
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Salaams harrywagner ... I like the Khanjar. A lot of people may confuse the concept of making new khanjars... They make these weapons now for the same reasons they made them scores or hundreds of years ago as a badge of office ...head of the Omani household ...and a tradition handed down through the ages. It is therefor Iconic ...an emblem of Oman. In a hundred years yours will be an antique but even then new Khanjars will be being made in the time honoured way and by hand.
Yours is an excellent high quality item... as you say some blade wear or damage which is easy to fix...or to get a refitted blade. The point being that the weapon is constructed so any part of it can be replaced... So you could transform it in minutes to an al Busaidi simply by changing the hilt...I would say this one has what we can say is a new hilt in high density carbon... and fitted to look like Ivory...I see nothing wrong with that at all...The design is what we call eyes of the Bedouin...and in what we also call the Baatinah (coastal) style with silver stitching all over the scabbard below its belt.

There is a similar style at http://khanjar.om/Parts.html See the Types...I read it as agreeing with Omani coastal Baatinah form. The composite hilt with silver pins easily placed without splitting.

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.



Hello Ibrahiim,
Thank you for this information. I did not know the pin arrangement style was called "eyes of the Bedouin", or about the Baatinah form.

We think alike with regards to the importance of a Khanjar's age. Quality and beauty are more important considerations. I really like this one. That the hilt is composite does not bother me. I had a difficult time believing it was man made.

Thanks again for the information!

Best regards,
Harry
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Old 23rd January 2016, 02:36 PM   #184
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harrywagner
Hello Ibrahiim,
Thank you for this information. I did not know the pin arrangement style was called "eyes of the Bedouin", or about the Baatinah form.

We think alike with regards to the importance of a Khanjar's age. Quality and beauty are more important considerations. I really like this one. That the hilt is composite does not bother me. I had a difficult time believing it was man made.

Thanks again for the information!

Best regards,
Harry


Salaams harrywagner ....SEE post 5 on this thread for a Baatinah (Oman Coastal) workshop making a Baatinah Khanjar...(see also #96 and #106 and #108 ) This form is easy to recognise being stitched all over below the belt section ...no expanse of leather showing. Pattern either geometrical or as is often the case an eyes of the bedouin design... Hand stitched on leather with silver thread. In the hilt of your example silver pins are hammered in to give a design and add weight to the hilt. Sometimes these silver pin geometric and other forms look like bull horn or rams head or floral shapes.
Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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Old 24th January 2016, 02:21 PM   #185
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Salaams All~ One burning question is...Regarding the Al Wusta khanjar and its almost identical like ness to the weapon in the Asir (The flower tribe khanjar...also known as Habaabi...of Abha ...which I note only differs in that the Asir style often carries a floral stamp and or a signature on the reverse. (Potentially an owners signature)

Was this weapon faithfully copied by artesans who may have migrated from Al Wusta /perhaps blood relatives...Silversmiths that simply moved to the Asir from Oman ...or is it simply the result of weapons being shipped from Al Wusta and stamped/signed in the Asir...i.e. traded in ?


See The Habaabi Khanjar/Jambia; FromThe Asir.

Regards,
Ibrahim al Balooshi.

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Old 28th February 2016, 11:09 AM   #186
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Salaams All...On reflection #3 and #76 whilst easily confused with Dhakilliyyah (interior) and UAE form are more than likely from the Sharkiyyah thus probably made in either Sur or Sinaw...Such is the difficulty in arriving at a birthplace on these weapons that I add UAE/ Sharqiyyah/Suri style knowing that leaves some wiggle room on these difficult to be certain daggers..

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.

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Old 4th March 2016, 10:42 PM   #187
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Hello Ibrahiim,

A wonderful and very useful thread, even for a layman like myself.

A further question if I may on my friend's khanjar we spoke about recently:

What are the standard blade length's encountered with Sur sailors jambiya?

Many thanks,

Chris
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Old 5th March 2016, 01:50 AM   #188
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[QUOTE=mrcjgscott]Hello Ibrahiim,

A wonderful and very useful thread, even for a layman like myself.

A further question if I may on my friend's khanjar we spoke about recently:

What are the standard blade length's encountered with Sur sailors jambiya?

Many thanks,

Chris[/QUOTE
Hi Chris,
Two things....these are not "sailors" Khanjars as such. As with most regions of Oman there is a port, but the origin relates to the REGION and not the port.
Now to blade length. Mine has a 6" blade which in my experience is about the length found on most Omani Khanjars no matter where they originate. There are no doubt some which are shorter and some which are longer, but on average that appears to be the general length.
Stu
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Old 5th March 2016, 09:17 AM   #189
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kahnjar1

Hi Chris,
Two things....these are not "sailors" Khanjars as such. As with most regions of Oman there is a port, but the origin relates to the REGION and not the port.
Now to blade length. Mine has a 6" blade which in my experience is about the length found on most Omani Khanjars no matter where they originate. There are no doubt some which are shorter and some which are longer, but on average that appears to be the general length.
Stu


Hello Stu,

Many thanks indeed.

I understand it is a regional definition.

I have not handled too many Khanjar's, but I have seen blade lengths from 6 to 7.5, so just wondered of there was an overall, or regional standard.

I suppose it depends quite a bit on the owner's needs, and what the khanjar itself is to be used for.

Many thanks,

Chris
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Old 5th March 2016, 02:40 PM   #190
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Salaams All, The Sharqiyyah region is further subdivided into Sur the Port, Sinaw, Muthaibi and a few other villages with vibrant Souks...and the huge area of desert and dunes that make up most of the rest of the region. There are variations in the subdivision in terms of Khanjars... Firstly I remind you that the dagger or blade size slightly different in Oman from region to region with some of the bigger weapons being on the Baatinah or coastal strip roughly between Muscat and Mussandam. The one area where smaller blades occur is in Sur. This is because of the seafaring tendency for smaller Khanjars on board ships. A big full sized khanjar was probably too cumbersome for that task. Also dotted around the Sharqiyyah you see the floral pinned Rhino hilt called Saifani and of course other names fly off the wheel like Sinawi and Muthaibi. and Sharqiyyah... The smaller form from Sur for example is called Suri. The largest is actually from Nizwa and is called Nizwani though I have seen a collosal one off Khanjar worn in Bahla about 20 years ago when I was visiting a giant...This chap was 72 years old and 7 foot plus tall. Bahala is famous for giants and his Khanjar was about twice the normal size as were his hands..!! They don't make them like that anymore !! A custom made Khanjar for a local Giant.

Confusion slips in when considering the UAE Khanjar mainly because it adopted the interior dagger of that part of Oman now adjacent the UAE...so they almost share a style.. Dhaakiliyyah (the Omani interior) and UAE.


It is very easy to underestimate the influence of Sur. This was the trade Hub and powerhouse driving Oman in the Zanzibar days...and before. It was a magnet for trade between Oman and Africa; slavery, Rhino, Ivory, ...everything. It was a hotbed of trade with Zanzibar,The Red Sea, Yemen and Africa....as well as India and all stations north.

See map at http://www.maplandia.com/oman/a-sharqiya/
See a Suri at #2 on this thread...Note from http://khanjar.om/Parts.html That Suri style often contains a money container silver decorated (Bakhsha) ...see webpage.

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Old 20th October 2016, 10:48 AM   #191
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Salaams All~ Note to Forum. The Khanjar Blade. (naslah).

This remarkable piece of engineering is around 17 or 18 cms long and 5 to 6 cms broad at the throat tapering to a point along a curved, two edged, centrally ridged on both sides, steel blade. The ridge gives strength for thrusting and withdrawing the blade. Cheap imported blades are two joined together whereas a proper Omani blade joins along the ridges. The little furnace about half the size of a football, is wood fuelled and heat is increased by use of hand bellows.
The best blades were made by a peculiar and historically virtually unrecorded group of itinerant Gypsy like folk called Zuttoot... or Zutti covered in my other post at length.See Kattara for comments #165. In days of old these small bands travelled about Oman doing tinning of utensils, making tools and sword and Khanjar blades...on commission and at random.
The blade is all important to local gentlemen and when inspecting a Khanjar they will ponder the blade first and foremost... not the scabbard or hilt. Often they take up the dagger with hilt in thumb and first 2 fingers by the very point only and lift it vertically... If they can easily lift it ... its a duffer ! If it slips from the fingers then its quality... weight, balance and blade metal quaility are observed most carefully..
According to Richardson and Dorr (The Craft Herrritage of Oman) The bedouin say that the best metal ore for blades is found in thunder storms where the lightening strikes!
One of the amazing ways in which they decide on blade quality is by tasting the blade?
Glue. To fix the blade, Lakk is used (Tachardia Lacca ) from an insect secretion. Essentially it looks like small blocks/ sheets of black pitch and is imported from India and Pakistan. The molten pitch-like lakk is poured into the hilts cuff(tuq) and the heated blade is sturdily pressed home.
Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.


Hi Ibrahiim

I decided to read through some of the Omani threads and am interested in this subject - the manufacture of khanjar blades. It has puzzled me a bit, even when I was in Oman over 40 years ago. Can you concisely advise :-

In the historic period (say pre-1950) :-

Was iron smelting for khanjar blade manufacture ever done in Oman ?
Are there iron ore deposits in Oman ?
Were the blades forged in Oman from imported or scrap iron ? (imported from where ?)
Were the blades imported ready-made ? (from where ?)

What was the position in the rest of Arabia regarding the above ? (eg. Saudi Arabia, Yemen, UAE etc) ?

What about khanjar blades in the modern period regarding the above points ?

Apologies if these issues have been covered elsewhere either in whole or in part on the forum.

Thanks in advance & regards.
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Old 20th October 2016, 11:02 AM   #192
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Salaams all~ For the Research Library~ heres a few shots of a workshop that produces fabulous quality... on the floor !! This is the maker of some of the best Omani Khanjars ever...
Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.



Salaams Ibrahiim,

wonderful examples, I'm very impressed. Does the Workshop have a Homepage?
I need to have one of these amazing Khanjars!

Roland
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Old 20th October 2016, 03:49 PM   #193
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colin henshaw
Hi Ibrahiim

I decided to read through some of the Omani threads and am interested in this subject - the manufacture of khanjar blades. It has puzzled me a bit, even when I was in Oman over 40 years ago. Can you concisely advise :-

In the historic period (say pre-1950) :-

Was iron smelting for khanjar blade manufacture ever done in Oman ?
Are there iron ore deposits in Oman ?
Were the blades forged in Oman from imported or scrap iron ? (imported from where ?)
Were the blades imported ready-made ? (from where ?)

What was the position in the rest of Arabia regarding the above ? (eg. Saudi Arabia, Yemen, UAE etc) ?

What about khanjar blades in the modern period regarding the above points ?

Apologies if these issues have been covered elsewhere either in whole or in part on the forum.

Thanks in advance & regards.



Hello Colin, Iron tools were made in Nizwa on forges as well as by wandering Zutoot before 1970... Much in the same way as Gypsies did this sort of work in other parts of the world.
Most of the blades are imported ready made these days... but this is a good question as it is said that (so it probably isn't true) the best blades are locally made. I have heard tales of meteor ore being turned into such blades but I have found no evidence of it. I will find out more and post here as soon as I can.
Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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Old 20th October 2016, 03:53 PM   #194
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roland_M
Salaams Ibrahiim,

wonderful examples, I'm very impressed. Does the Workshop have a Homepage?
I need to have one of these amazing Khanjars!

Roland


Hello Roland... Im afraid they don't ... The 21st Century has not quite arrived at the workshop yet.
Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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Old 23rd October 2016, 03:04 PM   #195
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Hello Colin, Iron tools were made in Nizwa on forges as well as by wandering Zutoot before 1970... Much in the same way as Gypsies did this sort of work in other parts of the world.
Most of the blades are imported ready made these days... but this is a good question as it is said that (so it probably isn't true) the best blades are locally made. I have heard tales of meteor ore being turned into such blades but I have found no evidence of it. I will find out more and post here as soon as I can.
Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.


Thanks Ibrahiim, I am looking forward to reading the results of your research.

The only references I have been able to find on the internet, are from the website www.omanisilver.com. It states that older khanjar blades were from Iran or Europe. The website also quotes from the book by Franz Stuhlmann "Handwerk und Industrie in Ost Africa", 1910 that khanjar blades were sourced from Solingen.

Regards,
Colin Henshaw
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Old 24th October 2016, 06:50 PM   #196
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colin henshaw
Thanks Ibrahiim, I am looking forward to reading the results of your research.

The only references I have been able to find on the internet, are from the website www.omanisilver.com. It states that older khanjar blades were from Iran or Europe. The website also quotes from the book by Franz Stuhlmann "Handwerk und Industrie in Ost Africa", 1910 that khanjar blades were sourced from Solingen.

Regards,
Colin Henshaw


Omani Silver dot com has substantially revamped their Omani Khanjar situation (which they are quite entitled to do ) and have now got a vibrant collection with well backed up references and detail. They include in the domain of Omani Khanjars those regions traded into by Saiid the Great including Eastern Saudia and South West areas that were once in Yemen but are now in Saudia.

(I disagree that Khanjars with a flower tribe makers stamp on the reverse of the scabbard are Omani...The construction of the hilt is different and of course the flower tribe makers stamp means "made by a flower tribal artisan in Yemen/Saudia" no matter what part of the Khanjar is copied into their making of it) However I fully endorse the website and reccommend it to Forum...www.omanisilver.com

I have not seen(yet) any home made blades in this regard but will continue looking. I would expect to find work by the Master of Sulayf or one of the other famous artesans but there are only imports available in living memory.


Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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Old 24th October 2016, 07:59 PM   #197
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there is no flower tribe. Southern Arabs include the wearing of flowers on their heads and sometimes on their necks.

Bedouins often photographed with flowers on their heads are the bedouins of Asir and Tihama and they are not from the same tribe. Its a simple tradition that is not strict to any group.

Otherwise we'd have the egal and ghutra tribe and the turban tribe :-)

As for the daggers, since the flower tribe does not exist, the mythical dagger makers do not too.
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Old 24th October 2016, 08:59 PM   #198
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A.alnakkas
there is no flower tribe. Southern Arabs include the wearing of flowers on their heads and sometimes on their necks.

Bedouins often photographed with flowers on their heads are the bedouins of Asir and Tihama and they are not from the same tribe. Its a simple tradition that is not strict to any group.

Otherwise we'd have the egal and ghutra tribe and the turban tribe :-)

As for the daggers, since the flower tribe does not exist, the mythical dagger makers do not too.


Whilst respecting the strict tribal nameology and that there may not be a tribe called the Flower tribe there are many people in the region in the Asir whose livelihood is based on flowers and are famous for wearing flowers about their heads...generically called by accident or design; Flower tribe. The appearance of a Flower Tribe insignia in the form of a bunch of flowers underpins that conjecture. No identifiable insignia exists in Oman with that stamp. The stamp comes from the Asir. I would assume that Saiid The Greats involvement in the region caused by trade both ways from Muscat to Zanzibar was responsible for the transmission. These Khanjars often have names inscribed: ...Yemeni.

However, it is not that simple since http://khanjar.om/Old.html the al Wustah Omani Governate has a Khanjar that is virtually identical to the Dojanni.

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Old 25th October 2016, 03:45 AM   #199
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That assuming that the "wustah" dagger is properly identified. I would have a look at the back side first and do recall wanting to contact them.

As for the stamps in the back, the most common is the palm and two swords. The flower design is not uncommon anywhere, and it is apparent on other items such as swords. The attributation of the artistic design to a certain tribe especially when it comes to this dagger simply does not follow. As it is made and worn by people of different tribes and regions.
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Old 26th October 2016, 06:11 AM   #200
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A.alnakkas
That assuming that the "wustah" dagger is properly identified. I would have a look at the back side first and do recall wanting to contact them.

As for the stamps in the back, the most common is the palm and two swords. The flower design is not uncommon anywhere, and it is apparent on other items such as swords. The attributation of the artistic design to a certain tribe especially when it comes to this dagger simply does not follow. As it is made and worn by people of different tribes and regions.



Palm and two swords... That belongs to Saudia does it not?
The flower form stamp is not Omani and further it does not exist on any Omani dagger or sword....It comes from what was part of Yemen, in the SW corner, absorbed in the 1920s.

Surely the whole point is deciding how this weapon came to be worn by two different tribes and in two different countries...? See the reference on al Wustah Khanjars at http://khanjar.om/Old.html Look at Types and under types see OLD. You may notice that in describing the Al Wustah that no mention is made of any name inscribed on the back or any flower stamp...I wonder why? Further observe how different Omani Khanjars are related to this form...indicating very certainly that it is Omani related ?

Since the important sea port was Sur and the trade contact point was Jazzan on the way to and from Zanzibar would it not be plausible that this dagger transferred to that region in the 19thC for which I have already indicated the Omani nickname after the regional capital Abha... Habaabi Khanjar...Of Abha ?

The khanjar in this example belongs to the Al Wusta governorate and it is on display in the Bait Al Zubair Museum, and features the following specifications:

The Al Wusta governorate khanjar See pictures at http://khanjar.om/Old.html and at http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...t=omani+khanjar

1. Handle: This handle shares the same design as the Al Nizwani, Al Batini and Al Suri khanjar handles, but it is a little shorter, and is mixed with the Al Sifani handle as well. It is covered with al tikasir silver design carvings on the entire top and towards the bottom to the beginning of the ferrule with the left side edges without design silver, exposing the original handle material. The same designs design can be found in the first Al Saidi handle design.

2. Scabbard upper cover: The design on the scabbard upper cover area comes in overlapping square motifs with Omani and Islamic motifs surrounding a circular shape in the middle. The same designs design can be found on the Al Saidi scabbard upper cover in the first and second design.

3. Belt holder: This kind of khanjar comes with seven rings, three on the scabbard cover and four in the belt holder area. Connecting them are silver wires in the form of a strand of twisted wires known locally as sim mahius. Another feature of this area is that the two outer rings have a conical head shape which can be found on the Al Nizwani khanjar.

4. Scabbard cover: This area is covered by silver wire, in the form of sim mahius. What distinguishes this kind of khanjar is that these silver wire strings exist only on the lower half of both the al chandah, and al mekhalh. The design consists of al tikasir silver. The scabbard cover area is shaped diagonally from the top towards to the chape, more so than the rest of the Omani khanjars, and can only be found in the Al Suri khanjar. Linking the area of Al Mekhalh and the Belt silver chain are small balls called mirqat, which are attached to al mekhalh with the belt to make the khanjar slant when you wear it.

Last edited by Ibrahiim al Balooshi : 26th October 2016 at 09:53 AM.
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Old 27th October 2016, 09:55 AM   #201
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There is another reference to the manufacture of jambiya/khanjar blades, to be found in the book "Traditional Crafts of Saudi Arabia" by John Topham, page 136 :-

"While the sheaths were often made by local craftsmen, the blades were usually imported from Damascus or the Yemen"
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Old 27th October 2016, 12:17 PM   #202
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colin henshaw
There is another reference to the manufacture of jambiya/khanjar blades, to be found in the book "Traditional Crafts of Saudi Arabia" by John Topham, page 136 :-

"While the sheaths were often made by local craftsmen, the blades were usually imported from Damascus or the Yemen"


There is a lot of loose referencing on the web ...e.g. http://www.thenational.ae/arts-cult...ger-circa-1930s where names like Damascus and Yemen crop up with no factual evidence ...I think they are traded in from India and as you say Germany...however I cant think why they don't come from Hadramaut...and local manufacture must have occurred...as well as Baluchistan Iran etc None of the blades I ever saw are marked stamped or identifiable...
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Old 30th October 2016, 01:49 PM   #203
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Al Saidi or Royal Khanjar. For another plate form short belt section see #128 here.
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Old 2nd November 2016, 07:19 PM   #204
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Palm and two swords... That belongs to Saudia does it not?
The flower form stamp is not Omani and further it does not exist on any Omani dagger or sword....It comes from what was part of Yemen, in the SW corner, absorbed in the 1920s.

Surely the whole point is deciding how this weapon came to be worn by two different tribes and in two different countries...? See the reference on al Wustah Khanjars at http://khanjar.om/Old.html Look at Types and under types see OLD. You may notice that in describing the Al Wustah that no mention is made of any name inscribed on the back or any flower stamp...I wonder why? Further observe how different Omani Khanjars are related to this form...indicating very certainly that it is Omani related ?

Since the important sea port was Sur and the trade contact point was Jazzan on the way to and from Zanzibar would it not be plausible that this dagger transferred to that region in the 19thC for which I have already indicated the Omani nickname after the regional capital Abha... Habaabi Khanjar...Of Abha ?

The khanjar in this example belongs to the Al Wusta governorate and it is on display in the Bait Al Zubair Museum, and features the following specifications:

The Al Wusta governorate khanjar See pictures at http://khanjar.om/Old.html and at http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...t=omani+khanjar

1. Handle: This handle shares the same design as the Al Nizwani, Al Batini and Al Suri khanjar handles, but it is a little shorter, and is mixed with the Al Sifani handle as well. It is covered with al tikasir silver design carvings on the entire top and towards the bottom to the beginning of the ferrule with the left side edges without design silver, exposing the original handle material. The same designs design can be found in the first Al Saidi handle design.

2. Scabbard upper cover: The design on the scabbard upper cover area comes in overlapping square motifs with Omani and Islamic motifs surrounding a circular shape in the middle. The same designs design can be found on the Al Saidi scabbard upper cover in the first and second design.

3. Belt holder: This kind of khanjar comes with seven rings, three on the scabbard cover and four in the belt holder area. Connecting them are silver wires in the form of a strand of twisted wires known locally as sim mahius. Another feature of this area is that the two outer rings have a conical head shape which can be found on the Al Nizwani khanjar.

4. Scabbard cover: This area is covered by silver wire, in the form of sim mahius. What distinguishes this kind of khanjar is that these silver wire strings exist only on the lower half of both the al chandah, and al mekhalh. The design consists of al tikasir silver. The scabbard cover area is shaped diagonally from the top towards to the chape, more so than the rest of the Omani khanjars, and can only be found in the Al Suri khanjar. Linking the area of Al Mekhalh and the Belt silver chain are small balls called mirqat, which are attached to al mekhalh with the belt to make the khanjar slant when you wear it.


All conjecture. The backside could tell us a lot. But there are identical items with Saudi maker names on them, this one is no different. A Saudi khanjar in Oman and an Omani khanjar in Saudi is not uncommon.
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Old 11th November 2016, 03:59 PM   #205
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A.alnakkas
All conjecture. The backside could tell us a lot. But there are identical items with Saudi maker names on them, this one is no different. A Saudi khanjar in Oman and an Omani khanjar in Saudi is not uncommon.



Conjecture? Please read again the post explaining step by step the style transmission throughout the Khanjar form from 1 to 4 above. #look at the references I have supplied...then consider the obvious trade links between Muscat Sur and Zanzibar both ways and the influence therefor in the Asir style....via its main Port; Jazzan. The flower stamp is not Omani. The question arrises as; Are the Asir daggers copies of the Al Wustah or did they simply apply a stamp and often a Yemeni or Saudia signature to traded in daggers?

I have never seen Saudia daggers in Oman...and finally Omani Khanjars in Saudia is precisely what we are trying to uncover; is it not?
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Old 4th December 2016, 12:39 PM   #206
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I had a few moments to spare so I recorded a few Omani Khanjars from the web..
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Old 21st December 2016, 09:40 AM   #207
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Just adding another Khanjar we have cleaned for a client ..People do insist on having this done since the oxide is black and easily messes up a perfectly white dish dash...thus they want their khanjars clean...It only takes about 6 months for the patina to return since the weapons are silver. This one is from the Baatinah and has a high density hilt of plastic...and a cloth belt in traditional geometry.
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Old 19th February 2017, 06:57 PM   #208
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The oldest Omani Khanjar seen so far here...Rhino Hilt Baatinah Coast said to be from Musanah probably a port and slaving station for Rustaq. Dated and signed; In itself a remarkable find since only Masters signed their work and dated late 19th Century...19/11/88. Some wear damage to the decorated lower scabbard. Narrow dagger blade. Unusual belt buckle. Massive scabbard.
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Old 19th February 2017, 07:19 PM   #209
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The second weapon arriving with the Khanjar at the post above, with similar decoration and Rhino Hilt and from the same source; possibly the same makers workshop. Again a quite narrow blade with two small fullers at the throat. Minor wear damage in the main scabbard decoration. Flat ended crown.I would normally expect to see silver pins in this Hilt and indeed this silver plate may be a replacement..
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Old 21st February 2017, 06:59 PM   #210
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Here I can place both weapons together to compare...Currently the confusion over the dated weapon is gathering steam since after the date is the word Hijri...indicating an Islamic date ...? but the date is rolled out as 88/11/19...
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