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Old 23rd May 2014, 10:57 PM   #151
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Originally Posted by Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Salaams All, Note to Library,

Correction to past threads on the Habbaabi Khanjar
form of the Saudia Arabia Asir regional dagger. The Name of the weapon appears as Habbaabi but is probably from Abha and either there is a silent letter at the front which has become muddled in the sound ... Abha is the capital of the Asir thus it is there that I think the name has sprung from. Abhaabi which sounds like Habbaabi.

It is this Muscat Khanjar that was "copied in" as a style of weapon into the then Yemeni region now part of the Saudia Asir region... likely imported there by Omani/Yemeni ships trading between Red Sea Ports, Zanzibar and Oman.

I show below the grainy old picture from what is an epic pamphlet on Omani Silver by Ruth Hawley. of the original form of Muscat Khanjar... whose design of scabbard became part of the Royal Khanjar by Sheherazad in about 1850. (It may be remembered that she designed the Hilt ...and also the Royal Turban).

With that please see http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=360 by Congre...for the Abhaabi dagger details also brought to the pictures below;

A map of the Asir is included.

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.

I do not intend to reopen the "discussion" on so called Habaabi khanjars, but the style of Khanjar shown by Ruth Hawley, has been described by the King Faisal Center for Islamic Studies in Riyadh, as coming from the Al Ahsa area of Saudi Arabia. This area is situated in the eastern area of Saudi, bordering Oman, and therefore many miles from Abha.
As far as the scabbard being the basis of the Royal Khanjar goes, I was of the impression that Saudi scabbards tended to be more up turned at the toe than Omani ones.
You attribute the design as originating from the Muscat Khanjar, which may or may not be the case, but concrete proof would in my opinion be needed before any conclusive decision could be reached.
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Old 24th May 2014, 09:21 AM   #152
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Originally Posted by kahnjar1
I do not intend to reopen the "discussion" on so called Habaabi khanjars, but the style of Khanjar shown by Ruth Hawley, has been described by the King Faisal Center for Islamic Studies in Riyadh, as coming from the Al Ahsa area of Saudi Arabia. This area is situated in the eastern area of Saudi, bordering Oman, and therefore many miles from Abha.
As far as the scabbard being the basis of the Royal Khanjar goes, I was of the impression that Saudi scabbards tended to be more up turned at the toe than Omani ones.
You attribute the design as originating from the Muscat Khanjar, which may or may not be the case, but concrete proof would in my opinion be needed before any conclusive decision could be reached.


I have no idea why you seem to be blinded by the Habaabi structure which I have referenced and covered fully even down to a map...and picture references. There may well be another region in the east with similar daggers but I have already declared that this needs to be investigated as the two areas well documented now are Muscat and the Abha region...The Muscat Khanjar and the Asir/ Abha ..known as the Habaabi Khanjar. They are not as you put it..."so called". They exist... and are now well documented .

The scabbard of the Royal Omani Khanjar!!... You have missed the point. Its not the Royal Khanjar Scabbard that was designed by Sheherazad...Its the Hilt!! The Scabbard on the Royal Omani Khanjar comes from the Muscat Khanjar.

It appears true that Yemeni and Saudia Khanjars are traditionally more turned at the toe...or to get it right chronologically The Omani Khanjar tends to be less turned at the toe section than the Yemeni and Saudia styles.

Within the mixture of Southern Arabian Daggers cross pollination, copying , mirroring of styles has occured and for good reason this Habaabi dagger has been adopted there...Seatrade...The Zanzibar link...

I don't deal in concrete. As you are aware on these pages cast iron situations are seldom proveable ..nor are they sought. This situation with the Omani influence in the Asir has been shown to be entirely plausible...how else could it have transpired?

I repeat that we have at forum compared the two regional weapons The Muscat and the Abha... If another area is to be balanced and compared then it too has to be researched...then...considered.

I am interested to know where and how it is explained in your Saudia reference ...that the Ruth Hawley Muscat Khanjar is in fact from Saudia??

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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Old 24th May 2014, 08:08 PM   #153
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Originally Posted by Ibrahiim al Balooshi
I have no idea why you seem to be blinded by the Habaabi structure which I have referenced and covered fully even down to a map...and picture references. There may well be another region in the east with similar daggers but I have already declared that this needs to be investigated as the two areas well documented now are Muscat and the Abha region...The Muscat Khanjar and the Asir/ Abha ..known as the Habaabi Khanjar. They are not as you put it..."so called". They exist... and are now well documented .

The scabbard of the Royal Omani Khanjar!!... You have missed the point. Its not the Royal Khanjar Scabbard that was designed by Sheherazad...Its the Hilt!! The Scabbard on the Royal Omani Khanjar comes from the Muscat Khanjar.

It appears true that Yemeni and Saudia Khanjars are traditionally more turned at the toe...or to get it right chronologically The Omani Khanjar tends to be less turned at the toe section than the Yemeni and Saudia styles.

Within the mixture of Southern Arabian Daggers cross pollination, copying , mirroring of styles has occured and for good reason this Habaabi dagger has been adopted there...Seatrade...The Zanzibar link...

I don't deal in concrete. As you are aware on these pages cast iron situations are seldom proveable ..nor are they sought. This situation with the Omani influence in the Asir has been shown to be entirely plausible...how else could it have transpired?

I repeat that we have at forum compared the two regional weapons The Muscat and the Abha... If another area is to be balanced and compared then it too has to be researched...then...considered.

I am interested to know where and how it is explained in your Saudia reference ...that the Ruth Hawley Muscat Khanjar is in fact from Saudia??

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.

Your para 2 above: I am well aware that the hilt is the part of the Royal Khanjar designed by Sheherazad. I did not say otherwise. My point was that the Omani scabbard of this Khanjar has not usually got a turned up toe, so if the "Ruth Hawley" Khanjar is a Muscat Khanjar, then the scabbard is wrong...it has a very turned up toe.
As far as the Saudia source I quoted is concerned, this style of Khanjar (illustrated by them) is attributed to the Al Ahsa area, not Abha.
I am also aware that you have done considerable research into these matters, BUT, word is not enough in my opinion. It needs to be backed up by conclusive and irrefutable documentation. If this is not forthcoming then what is printed here can only be described as opinion.
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Old 25th May 2014, 05:19 AM   #154
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Originally Posted by kahnjar1
Your para 2 above: I am well aware that the hilt is the part of the Royal Khanjar designed by Sheherazad. I did not say otherwise. My point was that the Omani scabbard of this Khanjar has not usually got a turned up toe, so if the "Ruth Hawley" Khanjar is a Muscat Khanjar, then the scabbard is wrong...it has a very turned up toe.
As far as the Saudia source I quoted is concerned, this style of Khanjar (illustrated by them) is attributed to the Al Ahsa area, not Abha.
I am also aware that you have done considerable research into these matters, BUT, word is not enough in my opinion. It needs to be backed up by conclusive and irrefutable documentation. If this is not forthcoming then what is printed here can only be described as opinion.



Last point first if I may; I think that is what Forum largely extends to itself and its members;... opinions. On occasions important details are uncovered sometimes sources are called into question. It is not for me to consider your source since it is not one I have to hand...however I would be surprised if it states that the Muscat Khanjar in Ruth Hawleys publication is from Saudia..and that the style of weapon seen and worn in the Asir is from the east...when it is clearly of the Muscat design..What exactly does your reference state?

As I have noted what needs to be done is a brief study of the Al Ahsa work and then to compare where required.. What you may find(though without wanting to pre empt ) is that the Al Ahsa may be related to Omani work and for similar reasons... i.e. trade with the Bahrain region ...not just a name coined to describe the Islands but a large slice of the mainland in which the oasis of Al Ahsa is located..

Regarding the Muscat Khanjar in Ruth Hawleys work..it is presented as a more turned scabbard. That is how it looks in her publication...I have not seen the actual item. In this case could there be some camera angle play going on?...or was that particular Khanjar made deliberately with a greater turn in the scabbard?...It could be simply a bigger curve built in as a one off... I simply don't know...or that Muscati daggers tended to be made with bigger curves...as #113 indicates..

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Old 25th May 2014, 06:08 AM   #155
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Originally Posted by Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Lat point first if I may; I think that is what Forum largely extends to itself and its members;... opinions. On occasions important details are uncovered sometimes sources are called into question. It is not for me to consider your source since it is not one I have to hand...however I would be surprised if it states that the Muscat Khanjar in Ruth Hawleys publication is from Saudia..and that the style of weapon seen and worn in the Asir is from the east...when it is clearly of the Muscat design..What exactly does your reference state?

As I have noted what needs to be done is a brief study of the Al Ahsa work and then to compare where required.. What you may find(though without wanting to pre empt ) is that the Al Ahsa may be related to Omani work and for similar reasons... i.e. trade with the Bahrain region ...not just a name coined to describe the Islands but a large slice of the mainland in which the oasis of Al Ahsa is located..

Regarding the Muscat Khanjar in Ruth Hawleys work..it is presented as a more turned scabbard. That is how it looks in her publication...I have not seen the actual item. In this case could there be some camera angle play going on?...or was that particular Khanjar made deliberately with a greater turn in the scabbard?...It could be simply a bigger curve built in as a one off... I simply don't know...or that Muscati daggers tended to be made with bigger curves.


There is no mention of Ruth Hawley in the Saudia information...it simply shows a pic of a similar khanjar, and a statement that origin is Al Ahsa.

I would point out here that the caption against the khanjar in Ruth Hawley's book does not anywhere mention Muscat. In fact she says that the item was probably made in the Sharqiyah, which appears quite some distance from Muscat. I am assuming therefore that any mention of Muscat has originated from yourself? Do you have concrete/iron clad information to confirm this?

I am somewhat confused in relation to your comment about "islands" in relation to Al Ahsa. As far as I can establish, Al Ahsa is the area of modern day Saudi Arabia against the Omani border, and nowhere near the sea. Maybe my geography is a little astray, but I don't think so......
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Old 25th May 2014, 06:43 AM   #156
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Default Bahrayn.

Originally Posted by kahnjar1 I am somewhat confused in relation to your comment about "islands" in relation to Al Ahsa. As far as I can establish, Al Ahsa is the area of modern day Saudi Arabia against the Omani border, and nowhere near the sea. Maybe my geography is a little astray, but I don't think so......



Bahrayn.

By Ibrahiim al Balooshi.

Prepare to have your geography straightened out ~ See the Bellin map of 18th C reknown...below.

It is vital to look carefully at the historical evidence.

This is a huge block of territory not solely the Bahrayn Archipelago but its mainland region. Wikepedia refers...viz;

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia;

Al-Ahsa, sometimes Al-Hasa, El Hasa, or Hadjar (Arabic: الأحساء‎ al-Aḥsāʾ, locally al-Ḥasāʾ; Turkish: Lahsa) is a traditional oasis region in eastern Saudi Arabia whose name is used by the Al-Ahsa Governorate, which makes up much of that country's Eastern Province. The oasis is located about 60 km inland from the Persian Gulf.

Al-Ahsa is part of the region known historically as Al-Bahrayn, which includes the eastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula down to the borders of Oman, and also includes the island of Awal (modern-day Bahrain).

It therefor transpires that your Al Hasa was in Bahrayn and further that may link it with the Muscat Khanjar style through trade... though I state again that careful study of the weapons from that rather grey area(Al Ahsa) in terms of known research may be required so as to pinpoint any links.
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Old 25th May 2014, 07:36 AM   #157
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Originally Posted by kahnjar1
There is no mention of Ruth Hawley in the Saudia information...it simply shows a pic of a similar khanjar, and a statement that origin is Al Ahsa.

I would point out here that the caption against the khanjar in Ruth Hawley's book does not anywhere mention Muscat. In fact she says that the item was probably made in the Sharqiyah, which appears quite some distance from Muscat. I am assuming therefore that any mention of Muscat has originated from yourself? Do you have concrete/iron clad information to confirm this?
....



There are about 4 Museums in Muscat who can vouch for the Muscat Khanjar as Ruth Hawley does indirectly through her quite brilliant study in the days when Muscat hardly had a motor car or road in it! Her pamphlet stood alone and excellent in the years as Oman developed, though, now there is a huge body of work constructed with the support of the governments Historical Ministry... "The Richardson and Dorr book". What you may or may not realise is that this country has boomed since 1970 but that before that it was virtually in the dark ages ...It continues to update its portfolio on antiquity. It cannot have achieved perfection in a couple of decades and unlike western countries has not had centuries to get its ducks in a row. What has been achieved has been done since 1970...that is all. There may be a few gaps...but we are certain of the Muscat Khanjars position as an Omani style.

In Oman style of Khanjar does not always indicate place of manufacture(or vica-versa)...Thus for example I can have 5 or 6 different regions workshops make Royal Khanjars...or a Sharqiyah workshop make a Baatinah weapon ...Every Khanjar workshop is capable of making many designs. My workshop in Sohar can make Sur style but it's nowhere near Sur. Sometimes one Khanjar is made in several workshops...The hilt here, the scabbard there, the belt somewhere else. Thus a Sannau workshop may well have made the Muscat style in Ruth Hawleys booklet.

You say now ~
There is no mention of Ruth Hawley in the Saudia information...it simply shows a pic of a similar khanjar, and a statement that origin is Al Ahsa.


But you indicated something quite different previously...the style of Khanjar shown by Ruth Hawley, has been described by the King Faisal Center for Islamic Studies in Riyadh, as coming from the Al Ahsa area of Saudi Arabia.


However, it is your interpretation of something you saw in a pamphlet. More reason for you to have the Al Ahsa work put under the magnifying glass therefor I look forward to seeing your results. Once that is done it may be relevant to compare that work with other regional styles.

Ibrahiim al Balooshi.

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Old 26th May 2014, 05:20 AM   #158
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Originally Posted by Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Originally Posted by kahnjar1 I am somewhat confused in relation to your comment about "islands" in relation to Al Ahsa. As far as I can establish, Al Ahsa is the area of modern day Saudi Arabia against the Omani border, and nowhere near the sea. Maybe my geography is a little astray, but I don't think so......



Bahrayn.

By Ibrahiim al Balooshi.

Prepare to have your geography straightened out ~ See the Bellin map of 18th C reknown...below.

It is vital to look carefully at the historical evidence.

This is a huge block of territory not solely the Bahrayn Archipelago but its mainland region. Wikepedia refers...viz;

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia;

Al-Ahsa, sometimes Al-Hasa, El Hasa, or Hadjar (Arabic: الأحساء‎ al-Aḥsāʾ, locally al-Ḥasāʾ; Turkish: Lahsa) is a traditional oasis region in eastern Saudi Arabia whose name is used by the Al-Ahsa Governorate, which makes up much of that country's Eastern Province. The oasis is located about 60 km inland from the Persian Gulf.

Al-Ahsa is part of the region known historically as Al-Bahrayn, which includes the eastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula down to the borders of Oman, and also includes the island of Awal (modern-day Bahrain).

It therefor transpires that your Al Hasa was in Bahrayn and further that may link it with the Muscat Khanjar style through trade... though I state again that careful study of the weapons from that rather grey area(Al Ahsa) in terms of known research may be required so as to pinpoint any links.

I guess if you want to go back far enough in history, you will find maps which show something entirely different from the modern day. I am talking about Al Ahsa as it is known today and has nothing to do with Bahrain however you wish to spell it. This link should help http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al-Ahsa_Governorate
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Old 26th May 2014, 06:36 AM   #159
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Originally Posted by kahnjar1
I guess if you want to go back far enough in history, you will find maps which show something entirely different from the modern day. I am talking about Al Ahsa as it is known today and has nothing to do with Bahrain however you wish to spell it. This link should help http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al-Ahsa_Governorate




But you do realise/guess that when the map was made ...the one above...that was the period in which these weapons were infused across boundaries and influence was developed...not today! but kindly observe that then Al Ahsa was firmly planted in the region known as Bahrayn.. Thus you must look at the history. It is not exactly pointless to view only the modern day scenario, however, whilst that is accepted on one level, it is hugely important to see it as it was ethnographically.

Nothing to do with the way I want to spell it... Bahrayn was spelled like that by everyone including the great map masters..It represents the spelling in English of the arabic word for sea (Bahr)...two seas(Bahrayn) (The Duality) The accepted modern version being Bahrain.

Perhaps when you are considering the Al Ahsa weapons situation you might include the historical idea? Again without wanting to cloud the outcome it does seem possible that some trade influence both overland and by sea was prevalent in that region from Oman and that Muscat would have had a sizeable hand in the shipping trade link whilst Buraimi would have been the Camel train jump off point..

Ibrahiim al Balooshi.

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Old 26th May 2014, 10:06 AM   #160
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I agree with Ibrahim. Bahrain and al Ahsa are historically connected and often ruled by the same dynasties. Also, the khanjars used in the bahrain island and alAhsa (including Qatar) are identical but the Bahraini's developed their own styles which includes stones on the scabbard etc and the uncommon use of ivory. Please google pictures of the Bahraini royal family and you will see many examples.

Although the Bahraini royal family uses Saidi and Omani styles too.. but historically, they had their own style.
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Old 26th May 2014, 08:04 PM   #161
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I agree with Ibrahim. Bahrain and al Ahsa are historically connected and often ruled by the same dynasties. Also, the khanjars used in the bahrain island and alAhsa (including Qatar) are identical but the Bahraini's developed their own styles which includes stones on the scabbard etc and the uncommon use of ivory. Please google pictures of the Bahraini royal family and you will see many examples.

Although the Bahraini royal family uses Saidi and Omani styles too.. but historically, they had their own style.

Hi Lofty,
I am not disagreeing in respect of HISTORICAL connection between Al Ahsa and Bahrain. The subject here is about the Al Ahsa Khanjar and the modern location of that area. I have no doubt that in the past there were cross connections and different boundries between factions/tribes etc., so the ORIGINAL khanjar could have originated anywhere.
As stated before, this style is illustrated in the book (not just a pamphlet as suggested by Ibrahiim) publication by the King Faisal Center, as coming from Al Ahsa.
I would respectfully suggest that if it is felt that the information is incorrect, then the person suggesting this should contact the Center to clarify. Their postal address is: P.O.Box 51049, Riyadh 11543, KSA
I look forward with interest to the conclusion.
Stu
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Old 28th May 2014, 04:51 AM   #162
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Hi Lofty,
I am not disagreeing in respect of HISTORICAL connection between Al Ahsa and Bahrain. The subject here is about the Al Ahsa Khanjar and the modern location of that area. I have no doubt that in the past there were cross connections and different boundries between factions/tribes etc., so the ORIGINAL khanjar could have originated anywhere.
As stated before, this style is illustrated in the book (not just a pamphlet as suggested by Ibrahiim) publication by the King Faisal Center, as coming from Al Ahsa.
I would respectfully suggest that if it is felt that the information is incorrect, then the person suggesting this should contact the Center to clarify. Their postal address is: P.O.Box 51049, Riyadh 11543, KSA
I look forward with interest to the conclusion.
Stu


In picking my way through your confused first paragraph where you distort Al Ahsa in relation to where it was and where it is today, though, to be honest to a newcomer to the dynamics of the region it must indeed be quite puzzling at times; I offer the following advice ~

May I first just qualify "the pamphlet" written in the early days by Ruth Hawley;

Although it appears as a relatively small pamphlet it contains a packed arsenal of fine historical detail probably not yet bettered til today...and highly respected by anyone studying Omani artefacts. It has been refered to by many other books and publications including the "Richardson and Dorr" and the book on Omani Silver by the prestigious Museum in Quwait; The Tareq Rajeb Museum, on the same subject. Though limited in scope it is a bastion of knowledge and the mainstay of many articles and books on Omani Artefacts. Her work is in fact a benchmark on Omani ethnographics, artefacts and antiques. You should therefor, perhaps, observe this '' pamphlet " which may help you to hoist in at least some of its content so as to deepen your understanding of Oman.

Furthermore, I have shown the direct link in style between the Omani Muscat Khanjar and the item from the Asir. Should you wish to identify another contender to be compared in the same or similar way then please do so...and since you appear to have to hand the documentary evidence then why don't you show it? I have no reason at this time to divert my attention from the key area already discussed ...The Asir and Muscat... linked by seatrade Muscat, Asir, Zanzibar.

In fact, you may well find that the area known as Bahrayn which included Al AHSA does have a dagger similar to the Omani style and that may well be down to trade as well... It will give you the opportunity to do some research and we all look forward to your in depth efforts on behalf of Forum in this regard.

To conclude; of course if anything turns up at this end I will post it straightaway, meanwhile, good luck on your research and note that you are starting with a reference in which you place high esteem. ( Occasionally, however, it has been noted that publications with apparently high qualifications sometimes fall short in fine detail through no fault of their own...perhaps you could illustrate the fine words describing the khanjar just to view as an example the historical depth of your reference?)

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.

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Old 28th May 2014, 04:16 PM   #163
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Default Sa'idiyyah Khanjar.

Sa'idiyyah Khanjar

Salaams all ~ I would like to make a point of rule/fine tuning governing the Royal Omani Khanjar form; The Sa'idiyyah Khanjar.

It need not be fitted to a 7 ringer scabbard though actually these are far more common than the few extant 4 ringer examples with the Royal Hilt.

It should be remembered that Sheherazad invented the Royal Khanjar Hilt only (though she also invented the Turban and Camerbund style at the same time in about 1840/1850). Technically, therefor, it is the Hilt which denotes Sa'idiyyah Khanjar, thus, the scabbard can take other Omani forms from the original 7 ring Muscat Khanjar ( See # 132 for both 7 and 4 ringer scabbards with the Royal Hilt..) to other styles of 4 ringer scabbard seen with the Royal Hilts throughout this thread...such as on #63 pictures 1,2,3 and 4.

Note also that Omani Khanjar designs above incorporate the small diamond shaped lozenge rectangles perhaps infused from the Nizwa Hirz (lucky charm) hollow silver box necklace.

A reminder to members is also made of the other weapon hilt fashioned in almost identical design to the Sa'idiyyah Khanjar hilt... that of the old battle sword or Sayf Yamaani seen in that garb at .. The Omani Battle Sword.


(Cautionary note; In researching the design features of the Habaabi Khanjar and the Muscat Khanjar something odd is discovered; The large silver buttons and split palmette flower shapes don't appear on Muscat hilts... but are apparent on many Royal Khanjar Hilts. This is recorded here and on a new thread The Habaabi Khanjar/Jambia. The significance is important since it could after all mean that Habaabi design features were copied from the Royal Khanjar after all !)

Please see #2 of http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...0899#post170899 for a startling new revelation.

Ibrahiim al Balooshi...

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Old 29th May 2014, 03:57 PM   #164
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So what does this mean?...(Cautionary note; In researching the design features of the Habaabi Khanjar and the Muscat Khanjar something odd is discovered; The large silver buttons and split palmette flower shapes don't appear on Muscat hilts... but are apparent on many Royal Khanjar Hilts. This is recorded here and on a new thread The Habaabi Khanjar/Jambia. The significance is important since it could after all mean that Habaabi design features were copied from the Royal Khanjar after all !)

Please see #2 of http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...0899#post170899 for a startling new revelation.

What it means is that if true and assuming the design features were copied all at about the same time ...that the Habaabi cannot have existed before the appearance of The Royal Omani Khanjar (see #1)

This means the Habaabi ..from the Asir is a distant cousin created / copied not before about 1840/1850 at the height of trade to and from Zanzibar between Muscat Jazan and Zanzibar(and that regional coastal area known as Zanguebar or Zingabar)...maps below... Small one shows Omani possessions...

All this expansion took place under the watchful eye of Sa'id bin Sultan (Ruler of Muscat 1804 to 1856 ) and it was on his watch that one of his wives...Sheherazad ..designed the hilt for the Royal Khanjar in about 1840.

Note that the scabbard of the Royal Khanjar was taken lock stock 'n barrel off The Muscat Khanjar but the Hilt was a total redesign..and appeared to include some Indian decorative silver style.

Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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Old 30th May 2014, 03:27 PM   #165
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The Royal or Sa'idiyyah Khanjar of Oman # 1 and variously throughout this thread..also refers etc. Below is a Museum item from "The Bayt Al Zubair collection". This style mirrors the 7 ringer Scabbard style of The Muscat Khanjar with the hilt specially designed by Sheherazad in about 1840.

Technically it is the Hilt which specifies the Royal Khanjar as such.
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Old 30th May 2014, 03:32 PM   #166
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Another Royal Sa'idiyyah style but of 4 ringer scabbard design... In the Baatinah form. The point being that is the hilt that designates The Royal Khanjar style, not the scabbard. Having said all that it should be noted that most Royal Khanjars are fitted with 7 ringers ...

In every 100 examples of Royal Khanjars I may see one or possibly two 4 ringers only...

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Old 30th May 2014, 06:01 PM   #167
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A question I sometimes get asked is;

"Where do the diamond shaped rectangles come from on some Omani Khanjars" ?

We need look no further than the lucky charm boxes (Hirz) for that answer and especially from the region of Nizwa.

Pictures below from the Historical Association volumes of
Richardson and Dor fame.

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Old 27th June 2014, 03:38 PM   #168
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Default A Most Unusual Omani Khanjar.

Salaams All ~ Of all the Omani Khanjar styles I have seen there is one which is difficult to place... Clearly it is old from the late 19th / early 20th C in my opinion...but where from in Oman? I found the picture whilst researching Khanjars for another project, however, I have searched for similar examples but as yet ... none. It may be because the silver maker...when he died ... that design vanished with him. There was one master silversmith whos work was of such a high standard that he was able to sign his work...not seen on any other Omani silver in the old days... The Master of Sulaif. I wondered if this was one of his masterpieces..?

The answer must be that this "style" is a Muscat Khanjar because it carries the 9 ringer scabbard and has a Tee shaped hilt on the dagger. The design above the belt of a geometric square of 11x11 silver round headed pins reflected also below the belt in a similar rectangle is for me a puzzle and unattributable to any silvermaker that I know.... The gigantic mulberry cluster on the Quba (crown) is also unusual. I have never seen geometry like this and of note are the 5 discs with 7 geometry decoration. Both 5 and 7 are lucky numbers and where the 7 reflects perhaps the 7 rings.

The overall feeling is of an extremely accurately drawn project piece with a beautiful almost delicate hilt...and perfectly balanced throughout..The technique of brown whip cord decoration on the scabbard under the rings is not one I have ever encountered..but is very attractive.


They don't make them like that anymore !


Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.

Picture from The Richardson and Dorr Volumes; The Craft Herritage of Oman.
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Old 27th June 2014, 05:05 PM   #169
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Constructive comments are always welcome so please join in. Voltaire is reputed to have said......"I do not agree with what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it!!".


Salaams All...Under scrutiny right now is the picture of a Muscat Khanjar at one of the most important references ~ Ruth Hawleys Omani Siver. This remains one of the best resource publications possibly ever and over the last 36 years...even though it is a small pamphlet its historical data is impeccable.

One picture, however, remains rather grainy and difficult to decipher.. The picture is below.. Is it A Muscat Khanjar or in fact a very similar weapon of KSA proportions...? From Al Hasa?? Note that the first questions were recieved from Stu who has quite rightly questioned the point about this weapon being from KSA and on another thread recently Richard G has me focussed on the possibility of a rogue illustration in what was virtually a sacrasanct publication..The problem being that Muscat Khanjars are very rare... but anyway what does Ruth Hawley say about it~

In fact she never mentions Muscat... That mistake is all mine !

She says~ Quote "A beautifully and traditionally decorated Khanjar.showing the blade . This one was probably made in the Sharqiyah and it is in particularly good condition. The handle is entirely covered with silver, and it has an inscription on the back. The decoration which forms the centre of the pattern of squares and appears at the end of the curve is made of silver balls forming a pyramid; this is typical of work all over Oman". Unquote.

I think it is worth considering that it may be from KSA; Al Hasa.

What concerns me is the woven silver beneath the rings and the loop UUUUUU
style pattern above the rings. The dagger at http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=18700 is similar. More red lights flash up when considering the belt which is not typically Omani. The huge turn in the scabbard would tend to point to KSA style, however, these factors may still be coincidental and more research is needed...It is apparently inscribed at the back but I haven't seen the actual item (in itself inscriptions are not unknown in Omani work but it is not at all usual). The dagger does not appear in the latest doctrine on Omani Khanjars. Mulberry fruit cluster silver ball decoration and square geometry are not specific to Oman.

Comments welcome.

Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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Old 28th June 2014, 03:59 PM   #170
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Default Dagger Re-identified.

Salaams All ~ With the benefit of 20/20 hindsight and with great respect I hereby re-identify the Khanjar shown above from Omani Silver by Ruth Hawley at the section on "khanjars knives and swords" and said to be Sharqiyah(Eastern Oman) made, as being a design of K.S.A. weapon from the Al Ahsa Oasis.

This weapon is said to have taken its design from The Muscat Khanjar.

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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Old 9th July 2014, 07:10 PM   #171
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Old 11th July 2014, 08:07 PM   #172
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Smaller rings like these on a presentation style may be possibly for the Dubai market but quite attractive all the same... Hilt poly, goldwash above the belt. ...Typical Omani belt of the woven variety...Unusual linkages belt to Khanjar...
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Old 16th July 2014, 07:49 PM   #173
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Do men still deploy these daggers to resolve disputes? Or is that all in the past? Do you have any information about how these were/are used as a weapon? I read that with the Jambiya they'd strike between the clavicles and split the body cavity open in one blow.

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Old 17th July 2014, 07:07 AM   #174
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blue lander
Do men still deploy these daggers to resolve disputes? Or is that all in the past? Do you have any information about how these were/are used as a weapon? I read that with the Jambiya they'd strike between the clavicles and split the body cavity open in one blow.



Sounds decidedly painful... Salaams Blue Lander... So far as I know the dagger is more symbolic of the head of the family and is a national Icon. Pulling a blade on someone is totally alien but even the act of taking the blade out during a dispute is awarded with a prison sentence... It is simply not on.
As a weapon it was classed as a defensive one..and the weapon seems to originate way back in the past as a skinning item... skinning animals and cutting meat. I have seen a Khanjar used to kill animals for feasts ie ...goats cows and camels.
The central ridge in the blade lends itself to the downward strike I suppose although I have no evidence of it in a fight...Certainly the broad blade is a vicious shape wherever it gets inserted but as I say... Iconic thesedays and not pulled in anger.

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.

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Old 21st July 2014, 02:53 PM   #175
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Thank you. In the Omani Sayf thread we see many 100+ year old photos of men wearing Khanjars that look more or less the same as modern ones. Do you think that even that far back the khanjar was a "symbolic" weapon rather than a practical one? I'm wondering when the khanjar ceased being a practical weapon, and how did those practical khanjars differ from what we see now (if at all)?
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Old 22nd July 2014, 07:14 PM   #176
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blue lander
Thank you. In the Omani Sayf thread we see many 100+ year old photos of men wearing Khanjars that look more or less the same as modern ones. Do you think that even that far back the khanjar was a "symbolic" weapon rather than a practical one? I'm wondering when the khanjar ceased being a practical weapon, and how did those practical khanjars differ from what we see now (if at all)?



Salaams Blue Lander, Good question... when did the weapon become more symbolic as a badge of office as head of the family? ...When did it cross over from being a skinner, hunter blade to the exotic item it is today... ? The Sherezad hilt item is known to have been invented in about 1840 for the Ruler by one of his wives ...going back further than that is historical, stepping stone, tightrope walking without a net...however Khanjars were around well before the Sheherazad episode... It is a matter of reverse engineering based on probability and magnetism. I have seen no documentary support to back up the probability... but this must go back down the ages many hundreds of years. The Omani Khanjar stars as a Funun dance; "the baraa"... thus it is historically linked...exact dates ... I don't know.... but the Funun being ancient pushes the envelope....

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.

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Old 20th January 2016, 06:47 PM   #177
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Default The al Wusta Khanjar.

Salaams, Please note the website below detail showing many excellent details about Omani Khanjars and at the top of the web page you will find different types to peruse.

One form is the al Wusta which is clearly the link style through the port of Sur (and with similarities to the Sur khanjar form) down to Red Sea Regions in particular the style I call Habaabi. This form appears to explain the odd looking 7 ring Khanjar in the famous book by Ruth Hawley; Omani Silver that on the face of it seemed to be an interloper...but which I now identify as Al Wusta as well. See #169 on this thread. The al Wusta is distinct in its likeness to the Bu Saidi Royal Form but more meaty looking though tantalising in that above the belt is the UUUUUUU decorative form also the style of decoration on the Flowermen type in the Asir / Habaabi form.

It is my view that at the time of the Said the Great this style migrated and froze...in the Asir (on the sea route to and from Zanzibar) when the Asir was part of The Yemen but since 1923 has been in a virtual time warp hibernation and as a part of Saudia.

I leave my explanation here to be examined by Forum... and invite input. The Al Wusta.

Please see http://khanjar.om/Parts.html

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.

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Old 20th January 2016, 08:48 PM   #178
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Shukran habibi Ibrahim, very good link!
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Old 21st January 2016, 03:57 PM   #179
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Default Omani Jambiya

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Originally Posted by Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Salaams all~ For the Research Library~ heres a few shots of a workshop that produces fabulous quality... on the floor !! This is the maker of some of the best Omani Khanjars ever...
Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.


Hello Ibrahiim,
Thank you for this post. I think I bought one of these last year. Photos attached. I purchased it used. The knife has been used, although it is in excellent condition. The blade has been mistreated but I can fix that. I like it. I like it a lot. There is nothng cheap about it. Granted it is not an antique but I can live with that. If I am not mistaken there is a photo in Mr. Gracie's book of one. I don't have the book with me right now but can provide the page number later today if you or anyone else would like the reference. Thanks again for the post. It is interesting to me to see how they are made. Not to mention seeing these incredible knives!

Harry
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Old 21st January 2016, 07:10 PM   #180
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Thank you for this link Ibrahim. It is very inreesting.
Do you know whose site it is?
Regards
Richard
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