Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > Ethnographic Weapons
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 22nd May 2013, 07:32 PM   #91
A.alnakkas
Member
 
A.alnakkas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Kuwait
Posts: 1,199
Default

In a jambiya or a khanjar, the hilt is probably the oldest. The hilt (and sometimes the blade) is the most expensive and treasured part of the dagger so it gets refurbished often and as style changes, you get to see those pins sometimes covered by the silver sheet which have became the new fashion or something.
A.alnakkas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd May 2013, 03:53 PM   #92
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Member
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
Posts: 3,927
Send a message via MSN to Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by A.alnakkas
In a jambiya or a khanjar, the hilt is probably the oldest. The hilt (and sometimes the blade) is the most expensive and treasured part of the dagger so it gets refurbished often and as style changes, you get to see those pins sometimes covered by the silver sheet which have became the new fashion or something.



Salaams A.alnakkas,
I'm not sure about that since the blade seems to be the most admired and important part of the ensemble...at least thats what the locals ponder over when they are checking out a Khanjar. They smell it and even taste it! It even has to have the right musical note when struck. Locally made blades are the most expensive. However, a good hilt comes in a close second and certainly huge value is placed on Rhino and Elephant.

On the subject of pins I believe this to be a vital point since it is really only Rhino hilts that can safely take the closely hammered pins as other materials tend to split. Pins are used to decorate other horn hilts but they are not hammered so closely. It therefor becomes a mark of quality... i.e. Closely hammered pin decoration = Rhino hilt. A good hilt is just about recognisable from about 4 feet away ! (I mean you dont want to get too close!)

I wonder which came first; the pins or the technique of using sheet silver? My hypothesis leans toward the Rhino hilt plus pins since I am quite convinced of the importance of the entire weapon and its link to the Rhino both because of the hilt... and the curve in the dagger and the added apparent curve in the scabbard... I suggest the entire Khanjar is Rhino inspired (Hilt, Scabbard and Blade) though no proof exists other than that.

In keeping with that theory I have also argued that the closely decorated pins reflect/ resemble the spaghetti ended strata of translucent Rhino Horn...

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
Ibrahiim al Balooshi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd May 2013, 07:41 PM   #93
A.alnakkas
Member
 
A.alnakkas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Kuwait
Posts: 1,199
Default

Salam,

I am not sure about the smell and taste part. Because some of the finer blades are polished and cleaned very often which means they'd likely smell and taste of polish material. The finger flick and sound thing is something that I am beginning to see often, but to detect the material of the steel rather than the quality, as wootz supposedly sounds different from other steels.

Anyways, one of my new khanjars with a rhino hilt arrived afew weeks ago and it seems to have a wootz blade, a rarity in Omani khanjars. Will post pictures once I am done with the etching and satisfied with the result.

Lotfy
A.alnakkas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th May 2013, 10:18 AM   #94
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Member
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
Posts: 3,927
Send a message via MSN to Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by A.alnakkas
Salam,

I am not sure about the smell and taste part. Because some of the finer blades are polished and cleaned very often which means they'd likely smell and taste of polish material. The finger flick and sound thing is something that I am beginning to see often, but to detect the material of the steel rather than the quality, as wootz supposedly sounds different from other steels.

Anyways, one of my new khanjars with a rhino hilt arrived afew weeks ago and it seems to have a wootz blade, a rarity in Omani khanjars. Will post pictures once I am done with t he etching and satisfied with the result.

Lotfy



Salaams A.alnakkas ~ I know it sounds very odd...but tasting the blade ... and smelling it are very much the old way of determining a blades quality...A good blade has the aroma of ...herbs and sweaty socks ! as does the taste. The old folks don't clean the blades with metal polish.

Wootz blades are very rare because they simply don't go for that as a style but locally made blades are sought after ...and they are laminated. I suspect that a wootz blade could have come from India or Iran/Afghanistan along with the generally known name of Johar...In fact I was just reading a fine article by Dr Ann Feuerbach in which she mentions the wootz material from which I believe the word Johar originates; Poulad Jauherder.
Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.

Last edited by Ibrahiim al Balooshi : 24th May 2013 at 10:31 AM.
Ibrahiim al Balooshi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29th May 2013, 10:47 AM   #95
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Member
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
Posts: 3,927
Send a message via MSN to Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Default

Salaams All~ Adding more to our library of Rhino Hilt data base detail. This Khanjar is without its scabbard. Nice old blade on a reworked Rhino Hilt. The Hilt can best be described as "Dull Yellow" until a light brings out the translucent effect and the spaghetti ends of the Rhino Horn. The pins in this case are close but not actually tight close as is the often seen application of silver pin work on this quality of Horn. It can be seen however that the pins follow a geometric pattern and great care has been taken in producing the effect.

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
Attached Images
   

Last edited by Ibrahiim al Balooshi : 29th May 2013 at 12:01 PM.
Ibrahiim al Balooshi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29th May 2013, 10:59 AM   #96
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Member
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
Posts: 3,927
Send a message via MSN to Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Default Rhino.

Salaams All; More Rhino for Library;

Note that this is a "4 Ringer" Baatinah Khanjar (Oman Coast roughly between Muscat and Mussandam ) mounted on a Rhino Hilt and displaying the "Eyes of The Bedu" decoration on the lower scabbard. Also seen are both silver(pure silver) and gold(gold plated) thread decorating the scabbard For the hawkeyed amongst you please note that this is infact the same weapon as at #35 except that in, addition, I now show the light on the hilt and an end of hilt pommel shot ...
Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
Attached Images
    

Last edited by Ibrahiim al Balooshi : 29th May 2013 at 11:44 AM.
Ibrahiim al Balooshi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29th May 2013, 11:18 AM   #97
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Member
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
Posts: 3,927
Send a message via MSN to Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Pommel End Photo.


Salaams All,
Here's the scabbard we sourced to match the hilt previously seen at #87...Well here are all the parts ! We just need to fit it all together !! Then the whole ensemble will be cleaned up and at about that point it will begin its journey of acquiring "Patina", however, silver being relatively soft and prone to oxidisation this ought to only take about 6 months.

The scabbard is an Emirati (UAE) Style and favours the very vast expanse of leather showing below the belt ~ though the toe floral decoration is typically Nizwa, Oman, done before the UAE formation when these countries were blended together loosely as one. (Trucial Oman States)(Muscat and Oman)

Afternote ~ The leather is hand tooled in simple floral geometry. Please also note that the central plate wrapped around the hilt midsection is hand decorated silver sheet... but the rest of the silver on the hilt comprises several thousand small silver pins hammered so closely they look like one sheet.

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
Attached Images
 

Last edited by Ibrahiim al Balooshi : 29th May 2013 at 05:29 PM.
Ibrahiim al Balooshi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30th May 2013, 12:30 AM   #98
RhysMichael
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Virginia
Posts: 521
Default

A couple of Thesinger's photos
Attached Images
  
RhysMichael is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31st May 2013, 04:01 PM   #99
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Member
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
Posts: 3,927
Send a message via MSN to Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RhysMichael
A couple of Thesinger's photos



Salaams RhysMichael ~ I will dig out some Wilfred Thesiger pictures with Omani Khanjars...The examples shown are probably Yemeni Jambia.
Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
Ibrahiim al Balooshi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31st May 2013, 06:24 PM   #100
RhysMichael
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Virginia
Posts: 521
Default

Thank you Ibrahiim I look forward to them
RhysMichael is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1st June 2013, 04:29 PM   #101
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Member
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
Posts: 3,927
Send a message via MSN to Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RhysMichael
Thank you Ibrahiim I look forward to them



Salaams RhysMichael ~ I met Wilfred 4 times. They called him Mubarrak bil London around here... Here he is wearing an Omani Khanjar which appears to be off the Baatinah coast. ( From the Thesiger Collection by Motivate Publishing ISBN 1 8735 44 316 )

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
Attached Images
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1st June 2013, 04:55 PM   #102
BANTARU
Member
 
BANTARU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 39
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Salaams RhysMichael ~ I met Wilfred 4 times. They called him Mubarrak bil London around here... Here he is wearing an Omani Khanjar which appears to be off the Baatinah coast. ( From the Thesiger Collection by Motivate Publishing ISBN 1 8735 44 316 )

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.



wow you met him!

Luck you. I wish I could meet him. was it recently (like within 10 years ago), or was it from the times when he used to roam around like a nomad? That guy is like the Lawrence of Arabia of the trucial coast.

btw he was called Umbarak I think.
BANTARU is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd June 2013, 03:31 PM   #103
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Member
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
Posts: 3,927
Send a message via MSN to Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BANTARU
wow you met him!

Luck you. I wish I could meet him. was it recently (like within 10 years ago), or was it from the times when he used to roam around like a nomad? That guy is like the Lawrence of Arabia of the trucial coast.

btw he was called Umbarak I think.



Salaams BANTARU ~ Yes Umbarak or Mubarak bil London ... he was the last of the great European explorers after WW 2 in Arabia. He is a legend here. I first met him in about 1989 when he was on a visit here and then several times after that but sadly he died a few years ago in London. Some lady stood up at the first meeting and asked Wilfred what he would change if he could in his lifetime...There was absolute silence ... and he pondered for a moment and said...in his very proper Oxford accent..."The um... Internal combustion engine" ! Wilfred was completely bedouin at heart and would have everyone back on donkeys and camels and never mind the 21st Century !!

I was fortunate to meet him before he died and took him to see a local friend, one of the beni kaab, on his farm near here. Wilfred was very frail and would have the odd flash back to when he was in the same area years ago and spoke to me as he thought I was Bin Gabaisha. There he was .. this amazing old man who had walked/camel ridden the entire rub al Qali several times in the most fiercely hot weather and often hostile surroundings where if he had been caught he would most certainly have been killed. They don't make them like that anymore.

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
Ibrahiim al Balooshi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th June 2013, 12:39 AM   #104
BANTARU
Member
 
BANTARU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 39
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Salaams BANTARU ~ Yes Umbarak or Mubarak bil London ... he was the last of the great European explorers after WW 2 in Arabia. He is a legend here. I first met him in about 1989 when he was on a visit here and then several times after that but sadly he died a few years ago in London. Some lady stood up at the first meeting and asked Wilfred what he would change if he could in his lifetime...There was absolute silence ... and he pondered for a moment and said...in his very proper Oxford accent..."The um... Internal combustion engine" ! Wilfred was completely bedouin at heart and would have everyone back on donkeys and camels and never mind the 21st Century !!

I was fortunate to meet him before he died and took him to see a local friend, one of the beni kaab, on his farm near here. Wilfred was very frail and would have the odd flash back to when he was in the same area years ago and spoke to me as he thought I was Bin Gabaisha. There he was .. this amazing old man who had walked/camel ridden the entire rub al Qali several times in the most fiercely hot weather and often hostile surroundings where if he had been caught he would most certainly have been killed. They don't make them like that anymore.

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.


Salaam Wajah,

hahaha yes I almost byhearted his book. I remember him expressing his dislike for motor-cars in it. Truly, I think along his same lines. I prefer the bedu on camels ,rather than flashy cars. They look so elegant and noble on them.

Wow thats nice of you. I heard Bin Kabina & Bin Ghabhaisha are still alive. I wish I could talk to them. theres so much to know. Bin Kabina is currently in Saudi Arabia I guess. Bin Ghobaisha was the most notorious outlaw of the Trucial Coast, after Thesiger left. He had many blood feuds on his hand, and was even imprisoned by the Emir of Sharjah.

anyways I guess you know all of this.


you are right. The hardy adaptable colonial Englishman is very rare these days. I wish things were actually back like then. .
BANTARU is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th June 2013, 02:21 PM   #105
RhysMichael
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Virginia
Posts: 521
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Salaams RhysMichael ~ I met Wilfred 4 times. They called him Mubarrak bil London around here... Here he is wearing an Omani Khanjar which appears to be off the Baatinah coast. ( From the Thesiger Collection by Motivate Publishing ISBN 1 8735 44 316 )

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.


I would have loved to have met him and just listened to some of the stories he could have told. To quote Buffett "Our lives change like the weather but a legend never dies" Thanks for posting the picture
RhysMichael is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th June 2013, 06:58 PM   #106
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Member
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
Posts: 3,927
Send a message via MSN to Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Default SANDALWOOD HILT.

Salaams All. A Sandalwood hilt for library. This Khanjar is a Baatinah design similar to #61 and the weapon being made at # 5. The design of the belt link hook assembly is quite unusual.

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
Attached Images
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6th June 2013, 03:38 PM   #107
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Member
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
Posts: 3,927
Send a message via MSN to Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Default Spotting Fakes.

Salaams All ~ The most common style of fake Khanjar for sale in the souks is based on the Royal Khanjar style ... The blade has a rather weak tinny ding to it and the metal is very shiny whitemetal or zinc looking. The rings tend to be a bit thin and small. The hilts are made of cheap wood. Look around the shop you may well see a heap of these ready to roll out once one is sold. No attempt has been made by the automatic workshop (somewhere in India)to individualise each Khanjar and if you can pick up two just check the details ...Copied fakes are usually identical. Heres five;

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
Attached Images
  
Ibrahiim al Balooshi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19th June 2013, 10:00 AM   #108
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Member
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
Posts: 3,927
Send a message via MSN to Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Default The Eyes of the Bedouin design.

Salaams All; Note to Library. This Khanjar shows clearly the design known as The Eyes of The Bedouin, and is a Coastal, Baatinah style of 4 ringer. The hilt is poly.

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
Attached Images
   
Ibrahiim al Balooshi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6th July 2013, 08:31 AM   #109
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Member
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
Posts: 3,927
Send a message via MSN to Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Default How to clean silver?

How to clean silver?

Salaams all ~ I have said that a quick way to clean silver is with toothpaste, however, there are some pretty effective brands like silvo which also do a good job. The traditional workshops use a burnishing technique that I have already described at http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...=omani+khanjars ..see # 26.

Another technique is with lemon juice. Literally squeze one lemon and using the juice and brush (I use a brass wire or copper wire brush) then rinse the object under clean water and repeat where needed... then rinse and dry... job done.

I show a pair of bangles; "Stars of the bedouin" and a pair of ear rings " halaq" (incomplete) one piece of each is cleaned. Silver is quite pure and oxidises quite quickly so the patina will come back in a few months. The wire brush is able to shift the oxide easily but doesn't scratch the silver.

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
Attached Images
 

Last edited by Ibrahiim al Balooshi : 6th July 2013 at 08:47 AM.
Ibrahiim al Balooshi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20th July 2013, 08:15 PM   #110
NovelsRus
Member
 
NovelsRus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 41
Default How to Clean Ancient Bronze, Brass & Copper?

Salaams, Ibrahim,

Long time no talk to! How have you been keeping? How's the shop going? I know you're especially busy this time of year, so I'll try to be brief. Unfortunately, I am a novelist (i.e., a windbag), so please bear with me.

Ibrahim, in your business, do you have much dealing with older copper, bronze, brass or silver materials? I've lately begun collecting ancient Viking relics from the Baltic region, where they first began sailing around raiding their neighbors and acting like outlaw bikers of the sea, back in the 7th Century. As a result, I'm dealing with a lot of truly ancient, long-buried items that are as much as 1200-1300 years old. You can imagine what they look like by the time I see them. Most don't even resemble the items they used to be (jewelry, flints, arrowheads, etc.) I'll attach a couple of Before and After photos of some Viking rings I bought recently, so you can see what these old pieces can turn into after the right amount of massaging, rubbing and begging.

So, my question, good sir, is this: Do you know of any do-it-yourself, home recipes for cleaning ancient bronze, brass or copper? I'm looking for something you can whip together in your own kitchen that's inexpensive, effective, yet gentle (especially on brass). Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.


Thanks in advance, my friend, for any advice you might have.

Sincerely,

John, i.e., NovelsRus
Attached Images
     

Last edited by Robert : 21st July 2013 at 12:07 AM. Reason: Deleted material not pertinent to discussion.
NovelsRus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21st July 2013, 07:45 AM   #111
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Member
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
Posts: 3,927
Send a message via MSN to Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NovelsRus
Salaams, Ibrahim,

Long time no talk to! How have you been keeping? How's the shop going? I know you're especially busy this time of year, so I'll try to be brief. Unfortunately, I am a novelist (i.e., a windbag), so please bear with me.

Ibrahim, in your business, do you have much dealing with older copper, bronze, brass or silver materials? I've lately begun collecting ancient Viking relics from the Baltic region, where they first began sailing around raiding their neighbors and acting like outlaw bikers of the sea, back in the 7th Century. As a result, I'm dealing with a lot of truly ancient, long-buried items that are as much as 1200-1300 years old. You can imagine what they look like by the time I see them. Most don't even resemble the items they used to be (jewelry, flints, arrowheads, etc.) I'll attach a couple of Before and After photos of some Viking rings I bought recently, so you can see what these old pieces can turn into after the right amount of massaging, rubbing and begging.

So, my question, good sir, is this: Do you know of any do-it-yourself, home recipes for cleaning ancient bronze, brass or copper? I'm looking for something you can whip together in your own kitchen that's inexpensive, effective, yet gentle (especially on brass). Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.


Thanks in advance, my friend, for any advice you might have.

Sincerely,

John, i.e., NovelsRus


Salaams NovelsRus, See http://robertbeauford.net/cleaning_ancient_coins and see how the expert on antiquity and restoration of such items carefully explains the whole thing... This website has everything you will need. The cleaning tips are well researched ~ just follow his advice.

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Ibrahiim al Balooshi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd July 2013, 03:23 AM   #112
NovelsRus
Member
 
NovelsRus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 41
Default

Thanks, Ibrahim! I'll check out the site ASAP.

All best wishes,

John
NovelsRus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6th August 2013, 12:57 PM   #113
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Member
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
Posts: 3,927
Send a message via MSN to Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Default The Muscat Khanjar

Salaams All ~ Note to Forum. The Muscat Khanjar with cloth belt and money container worn on the belt.(often 2)

The Muscat Khanjar another example of which is at Ruth Hawleys masterwork Omani Silver

The Muscat Khanjar is typically made with a TEE shaped hilt and the main body of the scabbard displays the same ring formation as the Royal Khanjar(see #1) and must surely have been the main influence on Sheherazade who designed the Royal Khanjar hilt matching it to a 7 ringer Scabbard in similar fashion...in about 1850

What is nice about the little money container is that it has 33 little circles decorating the front cover illustrating the geometric indicator for all the words for God... in the short version 33... In the full version 100.

This Khanjar was bought in Mutrah in the early 70s and is a fine example with a cowhorn hilt and very nice silver work.

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
Attached Images
  

Last edited by Ibrahiim al Balooshi : 6th August 2013 at 01:11 PM.
Ibrahiim al Balooshi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th August 2013, 03:13 PM   #114
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Member
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
Posts: 3,927
Send a message via MSN to Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Default

Salaams; Support to above post. The unit has a work knife of which the best are English or German Sheffield or Solingen cake/butter knives with reworked silver handles(occasionally gilded in gold wash like this one). Please note the way the belt is fixed to the buckle... This is the correct way using a simple leather strip as opposed to silver buttons. Both methods are correct but the leather way is the simpler...The overall design is based on the square within a square combined with the geometric figure 5 motif. and an all over filigree dense surround.. and at its centre the silver Mulberry fruit cluster (not cannon balls!) The Mulberry tree is common throughout Oman.

Meanwhile the hilt is nicely finished off on the back with sheet silverwork.

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
Attached Images
 

Last edited by Ibrahiim al Balooshi : 12th August 2013 at 03:31 PM.
Ibrahiim al Balooshi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6th October 2013, 08:00 PM   #115
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Member
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
Posts: 3,927
Send a message via MSN to Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Default

Salaams all Note to Forum;

Fine old UAE KHANJAR made in the Dhakiliyya (Interior of Oman) and refitted from the parts shown earlier on this thread..see #97. It still needs to be cleaned up and polished for wearing on a clean dishdash but here it is refitted and almost ready... The Belt is a traditional and famous UAE pattern hand stitched on leather.
For interest I show the Omani silver stitched belts for comparison in design. The UAE belt shows a lot of leather echoing the leather displayed below the belt whereas in Omani Khanjars the belt reflects the more intricate design in the same part of the scabbard.
Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
Attached Images
  
Ibrahiim al Balooshi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th October 2013, 05:02 PM   #116
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Member
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
Posts: 3,927
Send a message via MSN to Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Default

Salaams all, Note to Forum; Good Khanjar from the Baatinah coast with an old blade, belt and mangash (tweezer and spikes set) The hilt is cowhorn.

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
Attached Images
  
Ibrahiim al Balooshi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th October 2013, 06:22 PM   #117
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Member
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
Posts: 3,927
Send a message via MSN to Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Default

Salaams all Note to Forum ~ There are several other items that may or may not be attached to the Khanjar and Belt (or gunbelt) Here are some below... Note that the Mungash is a combination item with tweezers and spikes both in steel and carried in a bullet cartridge shaped container similar to the Kohl container.

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
Attached Images
      
Ibrahiim al Balooshi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29th October 2013, 06:48 PM   #118
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Member
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
Posts: 3,927
Send a message via MSN to Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Default

Salaams All; Note to Forum Library~

Adding this design to the floral geometry of Khanjars from the Baatinah Coast of Oman.

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
Attached Images
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th November 2013, 09:54 AM   #119
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Member
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
Posts: 3,927
Send a message via MSN to Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Default

Salaams All ~Stunning Omani Khanjar. This dagger looks for an equally impressive scabbard etc and is an antique Rhino Hilt with a beautiful old blade displaying two sets of triple dots either side of the blade ridge.

The silver to the hilt is new.

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
Attached Images
  
Ibrahiim al Balooshi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th November 2013, 10:08 AM   #120
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Member
 
Ibrahiim al Balooshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Buraimi Oman, on the border with the UAE
Posts: 3,927
Send a message via MSN to Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Default

Sallams All ~ Note to Forum Library.

The name of this hilt takes its name from...The USA ... Known locally as "Americky" this hilt gathers quite a following as it is easy to work with and can take close pinning of silver nails etc without splitting. It can be shaped, drilled, sawn and carved well and comes in several colours including black. It is lightweight and balances well with the knife blade and lasts for a very long time. Hilt "Americky".
Attached Images
   
Ibrahiim al Balooshi is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT. The time now is 01:53 PM.


Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.