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Old 12th December 2011, 05:07 PM   #1
Spiridonov
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Default 16-century firearms in stone

The beautiful stone sculpture of sleeping guards from Reutlingen Marienkirche in South Germany (the owner of photo is Timm Radt):
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Old 12th December 2011, 05:08 PM   #2
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else:
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Old 12th December 2011, 05:25 PM   #3
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Stone arquebusier
from this site: http://ostdudauphin.forumperso.com/...ources-diverses
Arquebusier de la mise au tombeau (Début XVIe) de la cathédrale d'Auch (Gers, France)
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Old 12th December 2011, 05:26 PM   #4
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Old 12th December 2011, 05:29 PM   #5
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one more
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Old 12th December 2011, 07:42 PM   #6
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Good ... very good !
Thanks for sharing Alexander
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Old 12th December 2011, 11:28 PM   #7
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Hi Alexander,

These stone sculptures doubtlessly range among the most important Late Gothic period artwork on early firearms known so far - thank you so much!

Best,
Michael

Last edited by Matchlock : 13th December 2011 at 06:22 PM.
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Old 14th December 2011, 10:26 PM   #8
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Two interesting surviving examples of almost exactly the Reutlingen type of Landsknecht snap matchlock arquebuses, their lock mechanisms either missing or replaced, and all parts originally and individually nailed to the stocks without lockplates, each ca. 1470's-1500, and preserved in the Royal Armouires Leeds. Please note that the - characteristically expected! - reinforced muzzle sections are missing, both in the stone sculpture and in the existing originals, a feature limited, though rare, to the period around 1500.

The arquebusier is illustrated in the act of fixing a length of thick matchcord to the clamp (head) of the serpentine!

Best,
Michael
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Old 14th December 2011, 11:05 PM   #9
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The buttstock of the Reutlingen arquebus sculptured into stone clearly resembles that of a completely preserved original item now in the Hermitage St. Petersburg, made in Nuremberg, ca. 1512-115, the butt painted with the arms of the Nuremberg family of Behaim, the three-stage brass barrel clearly more evolved than the ones illustrated above.

Best,
m
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Old 18th December 2011, 06:36 PM   #10
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In the Bavarian Army Museum Ingolstadt are three crude but nevertheless interesting arquebuses (from Schrobenhausen, a town nearby) preserved that much resemble the one illustrated in Auch cathedral (see images above).

The can be dated closely to ca. 1490-1500.

Best,
Michael
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Old 19th December 2011, 02:31 PM   #11
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Thank You for share this! It seems Croatian type of arquebuses
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Old 19th December 2011, 07:55 PM   #12
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Do you have images of similar Croatian arquebuses, Alexander?

I think these barrels are Nuremberg made and the straight or crooked buttstocks were common to Central Europe 500 years ago.

Attached find illustrations from the painting Die Schlacht im Walde (The Forest Battle), Nuremberg, 1502, and from the Lucerne Chronicle by Diebold Schilling, 1513, depicting the same short and either straight or crooked buttstocks on arquebuses.

Best,
Michael
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Old 20th December 2011, 09:38 AM   #13
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Michael, I mean this type (second and third from top to bottom)
http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/attac...tid=79565&stc=1
the book "Medieval handgonners" mentions that this type is croatian. We can see cross as the mark on the barrel. I have seen similar in book. But this book is muddle-headed
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Old 21st December 2011, 10:52 PM   #14
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Alexander,

As I wrote I am absolutely convinced that these barrels, including the one with the cross mark, were wrought in a Nuremberg workshop. Two similar Nuremberg hackbuts with the same workshop mark, and both ca. 1490-1500, are in my collection.

Best,
Michael

Last edited by Matchlock : 22nd December 2011 at 03:57 PM.
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Old 22nd December 2011, 09:52 AM   #15
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this book should be thrown on a scrapyard
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Old 22nd December 2011, 10:01 PM   #16
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Hi Alexander,

Before throwing it away, could we please see the hackbuts and marks in question?

Best,
Michael
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Old 18th March 2012, 06:33 PM   #17
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Old 19th March 2012, 06:28 PM   #18
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Default Stone Reliefs in Linköping Cathedral, Sweden

More, showing a crossbow, a stone, a trumpet - and something now missing.

All end of 15th c., the ceiling dated 1499.

Best,
Michael
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Old 20th March 2012, 06:18 PM   #19
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Alexander,

Here's a thought. Could the sleeping guard in the first image have timed his sleep to perfection? Knowing how much time it takes for the match-cord to burn a given length he would be woken up when the heat of the match reaches his fingers. Could that be an effective alarm?

Anandalal N.
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