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Old 2nd November 2011, 02:01 PM   #1
fernando
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Default A peaceful axe with a martial shape ... for perusal

How many of you guys are familiar with this type of axe?
Where does its form come from?
Could it be taken for an early weapon, with a most elegant shape ... Viking?
Bets on what this could be, are accepted
... those who already know, don't mention it; just stay acomplice

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Old 2nd November 2011, 04:38 PM   #2
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Hi Fernando. That is a very nice piece. My guess is Danish? Rick.
Your results may vary....
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Old 2nd November 2011, 06:38 PM   #3
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Talking

Axe me no questions; I'll tell you no lies .
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Old 6th November 2011, 07:42 PM   #4
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I confess i am disappointed for not having had a wider number of guessers .




SEE HERE:
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Old 13th November 2011, 01:53 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fernando
I confess i am disappointed for not having had a wider number of guessers .




SEE HERE:


Salaams Fernando, Excellent thread on the axe ! I was amazed at its use in providing cork from Portugal. Please see www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDaB-NNyM8o which sets out another use for this useful chopper. Brilliantly animated. I read that Portugal was the source for not only exceptional Port( and obviously corks) in days gone by but also in the same shipments were sent Yew Longbow timber for the English Long Bow Men.. This looks like a fighting axe given a second use. Regards Ibrahiim al Balooshi.

Last edited by Ibrahiim al Balooshi : 13th November 2011 at 02:06 PM.
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Old 13th November 2011, 08:28 PM   #6
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Hi Ibrahiim,

I can't manage to open the link you provide but, the one and only use for these fascinating axes was and is the "taking" (harvesting) of cork barks.

Certainly other goods besides Yew wood and Port whine were loaded in those shipments .

Says the legend that Robin Hood's bows were made with Portuguese "Teixo" (Yew). Possibly the shipment of this wood has no further sense, as Robin Wood is long gone and so are English long bow men.
But Port still abounds and still is a most required weapon .
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Old 14th November 2011, 11:49 AM   #7
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Thumbs up Not for chopping legs...

Here is Ibrahiim's link to an enjoyable animated version of the Bayeux tapestry:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDaB-NNyM8o

I really like these Portuguese cork harvesting axes (and, of course, I also like Viking axes). I first became aware of them from a magazine article about the threat to this ancient industry by screw caps and plastic stoppers. A picture of a harvester with one of these axes intrigued me.

Having greatly troubled a fellow forum member in the region to try and find one for my collection, I am now most grateful and appreciative to have a few examples, and I can attest that these axes do indeed have a very comparable profile, size and weight with a most classical form of Viking battle axe. The similarity continues with the straight haft.

As Fernando has said above, these are intended to be stained with sap and not blood, and only injure the tree if incompetently used. However, if one were to fall through a wormhole back to Viking times...
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Old 15th November 2011, 03:37 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee
Here is Ibrahiim's link to an enjoyable animated version of the Bayeux tapestry:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDaB-NNyM8o

I really like these Portuguese cork harvesting axes (and, of course, I also like Viking axes). I first became aware of them from a magazine article about the threat to this ancient industry by screw caps and plastic stoppers. A picture of a harvester with one of these axes intrigued me.

Having greatly troubled a fellow forum member in the region to try and find one for my collection, I am now most grateful and appreciative to have a few examples, and I can attest that these axes do indeed have a very comparable profile, size and weight with a most classical form of Viking battle axe. The similarity continues with the straight haft.

As Fernando has said above, these are intended to be stained with sap and not blood, and only injure the tree if incompetently used. However, if one were to fall through a wormhole back to Viking times...


Salaams Lee , Thanks for the correction on the Bayeux Tappestry website which was nicely presented. The Vikings traded with the Romans in the 6th Century in the Med and it is not beyond reasoning that they picked up or transferred the technology for these axes to Portugal where they probably called in for a tipple of Port no? Regards Ibrahiim.
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Old 15th November 2011, 04:20 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ibrahiim al Balooshi
... called in for a tipple of Port no? ...


Like this one ? A harvest not available at your local Portuguese friends, i bet

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Old 15th November 2011, 05:07 PM   #10
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Brilliant, 'Nando,

Could you buy me a glass of that Molinhas flintlock port?!

m
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Old 15th November 2011, 05:31 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matchlock
Brilliant, 'Nando,

Could you buy me a glass of that Molinhas flintlock port?!

m


The problem with these is that they are such precious relics that you don't have the courage to open them. Only 1000 were bottled and numbered .
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Old 15th November 2011, 05:40 PM   #12
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That was my first thought as well when I noticed how old the port was! On the other hand - of what use is a bottle of the finest stuff when you are not allowed to swallow it?!

m
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Old 15th November 2011, 07:49 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matchlock
That was my first thought as well when I noticed how old the port was! On the other hand - of what use is a bottle of the finest stuff when you are not allowed to swallow it?!

m


Easy; i drink from the other bottles i have of equal or better quality ... while i look at this one
You know, for as good as this harvest may be, the special label is more unique than the contents.
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Old 16th November 2011, 04:21 PM   #14
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Harvesting cork? I would not have guessed in a hundred years.

Fernando and Michael: If you both decide to share that fine bottle of Port, would you at least save the Bottle - and especially the Label !! - for me?

Rick.
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