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Old 18th June 2011, 08:26 PM   #1
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
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Default Exciting Project; Historic Khanjar. The UAE KHANJAR.

Salaams,
We were recently aproached by a prestigious museum to replicate exactly the Khanjar worn by the late Sheikh and ruler of the UAE; Sheikh Zayed. The original dagger can be seen on the attached photograph taken many years ago.
In this very exciting project we decided to introduce as a competition amongst the top Omani Silversmiths who were simply set the task of "copy that". Naturally we were able to examine the work after short intervals since Khanjars are made in a set programme so we could eliminate less excellent competitors at any stage. Several did not make the grade on the way to the final product .
The winner from near Sohar produced such an excellent effort that it was virtually indistinguishable from the original and had passed scrutiny at every stage of construction. Not only was the Khanjar and scabbard exactly right but the craftsman also did a fine job on the belt; tripping up only by fitting the short belt the wrong way around !
Note the different style of "rings" and the specific pattern demanded of this; THE UAE KHANJAR.
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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Last edited by Ibrahiim al Balooshi : 18th June 2011 at 08:32 PM. Reason: script change.
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Old 18th June 2011, 08:40 PM   #2
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Smile khanjar

a truly brilliant piece of work thanks for listing it regards napoleon
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Old 18th June 2011, 09:06 PM   #3
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Hi Ibrahiim,

Very interesting project!

I was recently examining an old Khanjar of similar style, with the sparse decoration on black background and I was suprised by the striking contrast with the scabbards where every millimetre is covered with wire stitching.

Could explain the significance of these 'simpler' (for want of a more correct word) scabbards?

Clearly a Sheikh could have any design he wished. Why not a fully embroidered silver one or even silver and gold?

Best
Gene
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Old 18th June 2011, 09:09 PM   #4
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Hello Ibrahiim,

Beautiful piece... and what fun it must have been to oversee this project.

Will you be posting photos of the exhibit/display of this dagger in situ, as it were?
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Old 18th June 2011, 09:45 PM   #5
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BEAUTIFUL WORK and thanks for showing. Not to detract in anyway from the other replies that will no doubt be placed here, I am assuming that this is also a UAE Khanjar?
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Old 18th June 2011, 11:56 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kahnjar1
I am assuming that this is also a UAE Khanjar?
indeed ... fantastic challenge
too, I am assuming that I bought in Sharjah-UAE in 1980, it's a Khanjar
not too far as general shape, from the ones carries by Sheikh Zayed
anyway, no way to compare with his beautiful dagger

+

Dom
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Old 19th June 2011, 03:26 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dom
indeed ... fantastic challenge
too, I am assuming that I bought in Sharjah-UAE in 1980, it's a Khanjar
not too far as general shape, from the ones carries by Sheikh Zayed
anyway, no way to compare with his beautiful dagger

+

Dom

Not sure Dom. Ibrahiim appears to be refering to the FLAT "rings" between the two round outside rings.
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Old 19th June 2011, 09:01 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Atlantia
Hi Ibrahiim,

Very interesting project!

I was recently examining an old Khanjar of similar style, with the sparse decoration on black background and I was suprised by the striking contrast with the scabbards where every millimetre is covered with wire stitching.

Could explain the significance of these 'simpler' (for want of a more correct word) scabbards?

Clearly a Sheikh could have any design he wished. Why not a fully embroidered silver one or even silver and gold?

Best
Gene



This is the mystery of art and style. Picasso did not paint those flat, paint-by-numbers-looking, child-like images because he lacked skill, training, or patience; he did it for other reasons entirely.
It is a common mistake in art appreciation to equate simple to cheap or unskilled.
Maybe someone can give us names or other details or insights into the two styles (of jambiya decoration) in question.
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Old 19th June 2011, 09:54 AM   #9
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Stu, as usual you are right
nevertheless, my comments were based on general appearance,
especially the silver wire decor on the leather who wraps the scabbard
the source appears to be identical, it's not you think?

I have no pretension of wanting to make a parallel
especially with regard to quality between my khanjar,
and that of Sheikh Zayed
mine, is pleasant, without pretension, the other is simply wonderful

+

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Old 19th June 2011, 02:24 PM   #10
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Amazing craftmanship! well done Ibrahim (Jazaak allah khair wild 3ami)

To Dom: What you have said amused me It is new information for me that Emarati people used Janbiyas and most certainly good to know that these are a type indigenous to the UAE.
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Old 19th June 2011, 03:10 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Atlantia
Hi Ibrahiim,

Very interesting project!

I was recently examining an old Khanjar of similar style, with the sparse decoration on black background and I was suprised by the striking contrast with the scabbards where every millimetre is covered with wire stitching.

Could explain the significance of these 'simpler' (for want of a more correct word) scabbards?

Clearly a Sheikh could have any design he wished. Why not a fully embroidered silver one or even silver and gold?

Best
Gene


Salaams Gene,
Good question ~ It depends which area the Khanjar comes from but generally if its off the Oman Coast (The Baatina) usually it is completely stitched and all the leather is covered by the pattern whereas if its from the interior there is often a vast expanse of leather showing. The other main type is from the Eastern region (The Sharqiyya) and differs both in the ring number (TOTAL 7) and design... plus the Al Bu Saidi which differs in the hilt(derived from an Indo or Indo Persian) and it too has 7 rings.
Designs are fixed by tradition and silversmiths dont make designs which are not set acceptable patterns. In this case all we had was an old photo of The Father of the UAE in the photo wearing his traditional design. He could have had a solid gold dagger made but that wasn't his style and it would never have occured to him to wear anything so over the top as that.. He was extremely highly regarded and could be thought of as the last of the great Bedouin.
I hope you like the dagger style. The UAE Khanjar.

Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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Old 19th June 2011, 03:16 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kahnjar1
BEAUTIFUL WORK and thanks for showing. Not to detract in anyway from the other replies that will no doubt be placed here, I am assuming that this is also a UAE Khanjar?


Salaams.. ~ Yes ! Notice in this case the same style of chevron shaped inner rings and what I see a lot of is 2 thinner outer rings (compared to Omani rings that are more substantial).
Ibrahiim al Balooshi
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Old 19th June 2011, 03:19 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dom
indeed ... fantastic challenge
too, I am assuming that I bought in Sharjah-UAE in 1980, it's a Khanjar
not too far as general shape, from the ones carries by Sheikh Zayed
anyway, no way to compare with his beautiful dagger

+

Dom


Salaams, Yes thats bang on ! You didnt get a belt to go with it ?
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Old 19th June 2011, 03:31 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A.alnakkas
Amazing craftmanship! well done Ibrahim (Jazaak allah khair wild 3ami)

To Dom: What you have said amused me It is new information for me that Emarati people used Janbiyas and most certainly good to know that these are a type indigenous to the UAE.


Salaams , Before 1970 it was all tribal areas(Trucial Oman States) and 100 years ago and beyond it would all have been one jigsaw puzzle of feifdoms, tribal areas and generally disputed territories. So really, regarding artefacts, and in this case traditional weapons, it was all under one umbrella...Except for a few slight differences Khanajer are basically the same construction, however, to the trained eye they are distinctly different.

Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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Old 19th June 2011, 03:37 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laEspadaAncha
Hello Ibrahiim,

Beautiful piece... and what fun it must have been to oversee this project.

Will you be posting photos of the exhibit/display of this dagger in situ, as it were?



Salaams, Yes a great project. Yes we will shoot some pictures when the exhibition opens ... dont know when as they are rebuilding the entire museum. Meanwhile we are going to shoot some pictures of the workshop this one was made in.. That will shock some people !

Regards Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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Old 19th June 2011, 03:40 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ibrahiim al Balooshi
You didnt get a belt to go with it ?
Aleikum Salam
unfortunately, wasn't available BUT ... if you teach me where I may get one
I RUN

+

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Old 19th June 2011, 03:57 PM   #17
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Default Khanjar Belts and Accessories

Quote:
Originally Posted by kahnjar1
Not sure Dom. Ibrahiim appears to be refering to the FLAT "rings" between the two round outside rings.


Salaams, Ya the chevron shaped things as inner rings.. What I dont see on the Forum is belts or accessories. A khanjar without a belt is less than complete. Nice to see that you have many belts on both your Yemeni and Omani weapons. I am currently upgrading the belt locker to include all the Omani Khanjar belts from every region. Occasionally I come across a solid silver short belt (The short belt with the buckle) and I have one to show in about 20 minutes ! In my Next letter. The things I dont have to hand are the accessories which fit in on and around the belt but I will list some and hopefully I will get these collected up for shooting :
1. Belt and Khanjar
2. Kohl (antimony paste eye darkener) container shaped like a gun cartridge on a chain looped over the khanjar handle.
3. Mungash (miniature spikes and tweezers for stitching leather and pulling thorns from feet). In a silver case and on a chain.
4. Silver Tobacco case and little pipe (tobacco is grown in Oman and smoked in about two hits from a little pipe often adorned in silver and on a chain.
5. Miniature silver earspoons (for getting earwax out of your ears!) in a silver case and on a chain.
6. The work knife which fits behind the Khanjar and is used for menial tasks like cutting string etc... often a Solingen or Sheffield butter knife with a silver worked handle.

~The full equipment is most attractive and sometimes you see it worn with all the ammo on an ammo belt worn under the khanjar and in this case the silver bullet cartridge shaped containers fit into the cartridge slots at the front in the slots nearest the ammo belt buckle..~

Last edited by Ibrahiim al Balooshi : 19th June 2011 at 04:53 PM. Reason: add on note
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Old 19th June 2011, 04:07 PM   #18
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Default Khanjar Belts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dom
Aleikum Salam
unfortunately, wasn't available BUT ... if you teach me where I may get one
I RUN

+

Dom


Salaams, Please see my personal e mail details on Members List and e mail me for details.
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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Old 19th June 2011, 04:32 PM   #19
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Default Khanjar Belts and Accessories

Salaams,
This is the short section of Khanjar Belt (Hazam)containing the belt buckle. In this version the belt is solid silver in two rectangles, articulated, and gold wash adorned, florally. It is said that the silver buckle was formed by pouring molton silver into a mold comprising two cuttlefish shells and then after setting, hand finished by the craftsman.

~I think a complete library of accessories will assist the Forum and I will add items of accessories and belts as we roll forward. The Khanjar is less than complete without such additions. I think a picture with a tribesman in full regalia would be a start so I will go and find one ! ~

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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Old 19th June 2011, 04:48 PM   #20
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Default Khanjar Accessories.

Salaams~
The intention is to plug the gap in our Forum library of Khanjar accessories and belts therefor anyone with any accessories lets have a look please?? Meanwhile I will start searching..

Regards Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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Old 14th November 2011, 01:12 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Salaams, Yes thats bang on ! You didnt get a belt to go with it ?
Hi every body
with help from "Ibrahiim al Balooshi" my khanjar has a beautiful belt

CHOUCKRANE JAZILAN YA IBRAHIIM
(thank you very much Ibrahiim)

+

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Old 23rd November 2011, 06:22 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dom
Hi every body
with help from "Ibrahiim al Balooshi" my khanjar has a beautiful belt

CHOUCKRANE JAZILAN YA IBRAHIIM
(thank you very much Ibrahiim)

+

Dom


Afwan Dom... Ibrahiim
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Old 2nd December 2011, 06:34 AM   #23
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Default Cuttle Fish Mold for Khanjar Buckle. (Ibzim)

SALAAMS ALL~ Omani Silver Khanjar Buckle (Ibzim)

Take 2 cuttle fish bones and carve the pattern into each face. Bind both tight with wire. Leave a tiny slot to pour in the molten silver. Re-finish after cooling. Richardson and Dorr page 227 refers.

Cuttlebone is ideal being rigid, heatproof and easy to file carve and impress patterns.

Regards Ibrahiim..
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Old 2nd December 2011, 08:40 AM   #24
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the japanese believe that even the most simple objects are beautiful. they also often include a deliberate but not obvious flaw, as man is fallible, only god is perfect.

sheik zayed was obviously a man of taste and refinement who knew that garish ostentation was not the sign of a cultured man, let alone a good ruler, who should be a servant of his people.

i am more familiar with the saudi styles, having lived there for 10 years, which i have always disliked and never bought because of the ostentation of the tons of silver wirework (and cleaning them must be a big headache!). personally i always did and do prefer sharp functional 'users' (which can have some tasteful decorations) rather than useless bejewelled decorative boat anchors.

thus, i hope this beautiful reproduction also has a proper forged and razor sharp blade (wootz?)
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Old 2nd December 2011, 01:11 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ibrahiim al Balooshi
Salaams Gene,
Good question ~ It depends which area the Khanjar comes from but generally if its off the Oman Coast (The Baatina) usually it is completely stitched and all the leather is covered by the pattern whereas if its from the interior there is often a vast expanse of leather showing. The other main type is from the Eastern region (The Sharqiyya) and differs both in the ring number (TOTAL 7) and design... plus the Al Bu Saidi which differs in the hilt(derived from an Indo or Indo Persian) and it too has 7 rings.
Designs are fixed by tradition and silversmiths dont make designs which are not set acceptable patterns. In this case all we had was an old photo of The Father of the UAE in the photo wearing his traditional design. He could have had a solid gold dagger made but that wasn't his style and it would never have occured to him to wear anything so over the top as that.. He was extremely highly regarded and could be thought of as the last of the great Bedouin.
I hope you like the dagger style. The UAE Khanjar.

Ibrahiim al Balooshi.



Hi Ibrahiim,

Thank you for helping us understand these subtle differences.
I humbly submit that these regional differences are worthy of an educational thread of their very own (with many pictoral examples to illustrate).

I do like the dagger style a lot. Very fine work indeed.

Best
Gene
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Old 2nd December 2011, 03:15 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kronckew
the japanese believe that even the most simple objects are beautiful. they also often include a deliberate but not obvious flaw, as man is fallible, only god is perfect.

sheik zayed was obviously a man of taste and refinement who knew that garish ostentation was not the sign of a cultured man, let alone a good ruler, who should be a servant of his people.

i am more familiar with the saudi styles, having lived there for 10 years, which i have always disliked and never bought because of the ostentation of the tons of silver wirework (and cleaning them must be a big headache!). personally i always did and do prefer sharp functional 'users' (which can have some tasteful decorations) rather than useless bejewelled decorative boat anchors.

thus, i hope this beautiful reproduction also has a proper forged and razor sharp blade (wootz?)


Salaams kronckew, Funnily enough cleaning khanjars is not as difficult as it seems ~ The quickest way is with a brass brush ! which sounds agressive but its not as the brass bristles which are softer than silver only takes away the silver oxidation and polishes the silver without a scratch.

The silversmith uses an enhanced method for example on stitched silver belts which are first cleaned in a solution called "sapun rita" (sapun means soap..see next para for how this is prepared) a smooth flat headed hammer is pressed firmly onto the silver decoration and pushed along the belt with moderate force...Burnished ... Cleaning the khanjar is a peculiar operation which sounds a bit majical ~

Sapun Rita is prepared by setting fire to a rita berry which when dropped into water disolves immediately forming a burnishing solution..into which the khanjar is dipped then brushed vigourously and given the mallet press treatment as above. It is a long lasting polish technique suited to filigree and needleworked silver stitching on Khanjar scabbard and belt.

Khanjar Blades (Naslah). On the subject of Wootz or Johar blades though a few may exist Omani and UAE Khanjars don't use such steel. Sheikh Zayeds Khanjar was, thus, not Wootz... but razor sharp on both inner and outer edges.

Regards Ibrahiim al Balooshi.

Last edited by Ibrahiim al Balooshi : 2nd December 2011 at 03:43 PM.
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Old 2nd December 2011, 03:41 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Atlantia
Hi Ibrahiim,

Thank you for helping us understand these subtle differences.
I humbly submit that these regional differences are worthy of an educational thread of their very own (with many pictoral examples to illustrate).

I do like the dagger style a lot. Very fine work indeed.

Best
Gene


Salaams Atlantia,

I use the words generally and usually quite liberally when describing the area from which a Khanjar originates~ In fact it is more likely that other than the Al bu Said Khanjar( Khanjar sa'idiyyah) which is really the only Khanjar which is "classifiable" in its own right ~ all other khanjars can be made in all silversmiths locations... these days. Having said that certain silversmiths specialise in this or that floral geometric or arabesque design but it is actually hugely difficult to pinpoint or even to say this is from Sur or this style is Bedu. Making it more difficult is the local habit of upgrading weapons; changing hilts, adding accoutrements to the waistbelt and so on but in general you could say a khanjar with a lot of leather showing on the lower scabbard is from the Interior (Dhakiliyyah) whilst massively stitched showing no leather is off the Coast. Daggers with rounded pommels are from the Sharqiyyah(east) whilst T shaped hilts are coastal (baatinah)or elsewhere ~ Generally !

Regards,
Ibrahiim al Balooshi.
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