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Old 2nd May 2017, 02:34 AM   #1
Rafngard
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Default A recently acquired tabak (from Apalit?)

Hello All,

I don't have this one in hand yet, and thus the pics are from the seller. I usually wait to post new pieces until I have them in hand, but I realized tonight that the tooled design on the scabbard of this tabak matches, nearly exactly, the design on a matulis I have from Apalit. The hilt shape also looks distinctly like others I know from Apalit. I suspect this then is also from Apalit Perhaps even the same maker.

The matulis in question is the first (and longest) one here.

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=22118

I'll post more pics when I have it in hand.

If I had to guess, I might place this at early 20th century?

What do people think?

Have fun,
Leif
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Old 2nd May 2017, 02:35 AM   #2
Rafngard
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And for comparison, the design on the previously posted Matulis
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Old 2nd May 2017, 03:35 PM   #3
Sajen
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Hi Leif,

agree with nearly all your observations but I think that the scabbard is much younger as the tabak.
The knife byself I would place between the 1920s until 1940s but the scabbard looks much younger. Courious to see your pictures.

Regards,
Detlef
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Old 2nd May 2017, 10:18 PM   #4
Rafngard
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sajen
The knife byself I would place between the 1920s until 1940s but the scabbard looks much younger.


Do you think the scabbard is significantly younger in both cases?

So it arrived today! Quick shipping. These are after a bit of light cleaning with soap, water, and for the brass ferrule, lemon juice and salt.

Both the Blade and the scabbard are marked with the number "12." One side of the blade as what might have been intended to say "Apalit EB," but the stamp is unclear. I'm including side by side comparison of the tooled patterns on the tooled leather scabbard. They're nearly identical. The rear side of the scabbard shows similar construction.

Also, does anyone have any thoughts on caring for the leather? It's rather "dry" at present.

Thanks,
Leif
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Old 3rd May 2017, 08:41 PM   #5
Sajen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rafngard
Do you think the scabbard is significantly younger in both cases?


No, you are correct, I think the tabak is complete (sword & scabbard) younger as the other sword.

I use shoe polish for leather scabbards, it works great for me.

Regards,
Detlef
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Old 18th June 2018, 05:59 AM   #6
Ian
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Leif:

You recently linked this thread in discussing another Apalit knife. I'm sorry I did not respond to your initial post--better late than never I guess.

Thank you for posting this example of a tabak with an Apalit hilt. I have not seen such a combination before, and I associate the tabak more with Ilokano examples, sometimes with a sinan kapitan hilt (the head of a guy in a military cap). This same blade style is seen in a Negrito weapon form that Fox* labeled as a katana and which he says was used for combat.

Very interesting mix of styles on your knife.

Ian.


* Fox, R.B. The Pinatubo Negritos: Their useful plants and material culture. Philippine Journal of Science 81: 260361, 1952. [For a transcription of the text and copies of the figures, see here.]

Last edited by Ian : 18th June 2018 at 06:17 AM. Reason: Added reference
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