Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > European Armoury
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 29th July 2010, 07:46 AM   #1
Spiridonov
Member
 
Spiridonov's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Russia, Leningrad
Posts: 347
Send a message via ICQ to Spiridonov
Default auction arquebuse

Spiridonov is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29th July 2010, 04:41 PM   #2
Matchlock
(deceased)
 
Matchlock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Bavaria, Germany - the center of 15th and 16th century gunmaking
Posts: 4,310
Default

Thank you for posting this one, Alexander!

This interesting arquebus was sold San Giorgio Aste, Genova, Italy, in March 2010.

What I can say about this piece:

As Alexander brilliantly noted the date 'late 16th century' is way too rough to nearly get to the point.

The barrel actually seems to be from a Pilsen type long ca. 1520's snap matchlock (Nuremberg?) arquebus* - they too bear marks near the muzzle, although the present oxen head is unknown to me - , the pan is a Thirty Years War replacement (it is rectangular, with an thin wall, while the pans of 1520-30 had round troughs and rather thick walls), the pivoted cover is missing. The beechwood stock obviously dates from the later Thirty Years War (1618-48), it is very crude and the form of the belly butt is characteristic of the late 1640's to the 1650's. It is probable that the horizontal hole in the butt was for placing a finger there in order to directing the aiming of the gun while the transversal iron bar thru the forestock was most probably meant ro be stabilized in some kind of rest. Also the highly remarkable underside of the butt indented for fingers - a design known from the 'fingered' trigger guards of contemporary wheel-locks - certainly denotes the way the stock was handled. The barrel tang is from the time of re-stocking, this barrel originally had no or just a very short tang.

Another remarkable feature is that the long muzzle section (Mündungskopf) is not enclosed by the forestock. As I pointed out in earlier threads, this is a stylistic detail typical of German 1520's-30's barrels, as are the incised dividing lines. Interestingly enough, the stock maker of the 1640's respected this early feature; he doubtlessly knew the original stock which he replaced - and respectfully took this late Gothic stylistic detail over from his long gone by predecessor!

Please cf. my thread on my ca. 1640 Regensburg heavy haquebut using a re-stocked ca. 1490 Nuremberg barrel:



Like Fernando, I feel that links to other sites should not become regular here; copying the pics and posting them would be much better and more polite to fellow members; so this is what I did. I also reworked them the best I could.

* Please see my former thread on the Pilsen snap matchlock arquebuses.

Best,
Michail
Attached Images
         

Last edited by Matchlock : 29th July 2010 at 11:21 PM.
Matchlock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29th July 2010, 10:03 PM   #3
Matchlock
(deceased)
 
Matchlock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Bavaria, Germany - the center of 15th and 16th century gunmaking
Posts: 4,310
Default

These are the remnants of the original 1520's long block back sight removed later!

Best,
Michael
Attached Images
 
Matchlock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th August 2010, 02:05 PM   #4
Matchlock
(deceased)
 
Matchlock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Bavaria, Germany - the center of 15th and 16th century gunmaking
Posts: 4,310
Default

That's what the back sight originally looked like - detail of a ca. 1530 barrel.

Michael
Attached Images
 
Matchlock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th August 2010, 05:31 PM   #5
Matchlock
(deceased)
 
Matchlock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Bavaria, Germany - the center of 15th and 16th century gunmaking
Posts: 4,310
Default

For a similar piece with an even older barrel re-stocked in ca. 1640 from my collection, please see

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=10481

Please note the same belly butt characteristic of the 1640's.

Best,
Michael
Matchlock is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT. The time now is 06:57 PM.


Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.