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Old 27th February 2010, 03:51 PM   #1
junker
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Default Axe Display

Hello,
the post of the boarding axe let me to the question how to display axes.
I have some with different length (handle from 1,5 m to 25 cm) but no idea how i can display them, but some simple nails on the wall.
Have anyone of you a good example ?
regards
Dirk
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Old 27th February 2010, 10:31 PM   #2
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Having just a few axes myself, I tried several methods and what you can see in the photo works best for me. These are segments of security fence, made of welded, hardend steel rods. Each segment is 2X1m. I had cut the raw finials, welded six ferrules on each segment (to fit on the wall with screws and wall-plugs) and spray-painted the whole thing white. It can hold a lot of weight and it gives flexibility of arrangement.
Another way is to screw long, paralell wood strips and put nails into them.
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Old 28th February 2010, 04:14 AM   #3
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Holy Cow, BroadAxe! Just "a few" axes

I especially like some of your smaller bearded axes. Do you happen to have a copy of Hartzler and Knowles book on frontier axes/tomahawks? The second edition is more affordable. has more pics in it and is definitely worth the buy.
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Old 28th February 2010, 08:35 AM   #4
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Yep, a few indeed
The photo was taken at my old appartment. I had moved several months ago and brought the same system of display to my new place, now the method of arrange is more systematic.
I'm looking toaday also after smaller axes, I have some peculiar finds.
I do have that book, it is the revised edition and signed by Hartzler. I use it often.
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Old 28th February 2010, 06:00 PM   #5
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Hi broadaxe,
thanks for your idea.
Because they are too heavy axes will lie in my cupboard since now. This one is the biggest one and need a lot of place in it, so i search for a different kind of displaying it.
The seller told me it was used by fishermans, but i wont agree with that.
Dirk
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Old 1st March 2010, 10:33 AM   #6
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Fisherman's? good one... fishermen used mostly large cleavers, sometimes of special form. Here in Israel, they like the british WWII machetes.
I have to see its other side and geometry - is it canted, "side axe", or symmetrical.
Either way, it is a very nice european woodworking axe, judging from it shape to be 17th to late 18th century. That shape has currently been defined as "beheading axe" (not so wrongly though).
Weight & size of the axes are the reasons I have chosen the fence segments - it is very strong, can support the weight and also distribute the weight suspended from the wall. Wood beams will do as close.
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Old 30th March 2010, 01:40 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by junker
Hi broadaxe,
thanks for your idea.
Because they are too heavy axes will lie in my cupboard since now. This one is the biggest one and need a lot of place in it, so i search for a different kind of displaying it.
The seller told me it was used by fishermans, but i wont agree with that.
Dirk



Hi Dirk,

Maybe 13th to 14th century - by the latest.

Congrats and best wishes,
Michael
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Old 30th March 2010, 01:44 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by broadaxe
Yep, a few indeed
The photo was taken at my old appartment. I had moved several months ago and brought the same system of display to my new place, now the method of arrange is more systematic.
I'm looking toaday also after smaller axes, I have some peculiar finds.
I do have that book, it is the revised edition and signed by Hartzler. I use it often.



Hi broadaxe,

Your user name should say it all but now we got the proof: very well done!!!

I would be glad if you shared the new arrangement with us and would be especially interested in your earliest pieces which are sadly cut off in your present image.

Best,
Michael
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Old 30th March 2010, 04:15 PM   #9
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Thanks Michael
Well, as I wrote above, I use today the same way of dispaly, but I made an attempt to arrange the axes in a thematic/geographic order. It is better now than before, but since space is, after all, limited, I had no chioce but to spoil the good order for the sake of space. Nevertheless, I'll make some photos for you all to see, along your request. If by any chance I forget, say within 3-4 days, do not hesitate to nag me through PM. Happy holidays!
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Old 13th April 2010, 10:39 PM   #10
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Well, here are pics of my display. It's very hard to get good focus & lighting in such photos, so if you have special requests to see individual items please ask.
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Old 15th April 2010, 07:36 PM   #11
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Ohh, I have no words for that, thats amazing
Dirk
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Old 17th April 2010, 03:17 PM   #12
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That's what each monothematic collection should try to achieve: a perfectly constructed concept.

Congratulations,
Michael
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Old 18th April 2010, 01:47 PM   #13
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Thanks guys. Well, this is not so perfect, I had to do some compromises because of the space limit.
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Old 12th May 2010, 07:39 PM   #14
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WOW! THATS QUITE A COLLECTION OF AXES, I DIDN'T SEE ANY EXAMPLES OF OCEANIC FIGHTING AXES, IS YOUR COLLECTION MOSTLY EUROPEAN?. I HAVE NOT SEEN ANY AXES LIKE THE ONES IN YOUR SECOND PICTURE (ONES WITH HORSES, FOX, BIRDS AND A BEAR) WHAT WERE THEY USED FOR AND WHERE ARE THEY FROM?
I USE A SIMULAR SYSTEM FOR MOUNTING WEAPONS IT CAN SUPPORT A LOT OF WEIGHT AND PLASTIC TIE WRAPS CAN BE EASILY REMOVED TO REARRANGE THE DISPLAY OR REMOVE AN ITEM FOR STUDY. CONGRADULATIONS ON A GREAT COLLECTION.
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Old 12th May 2010, 07:50 PM   #15
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Wow! I can only imagine that display set in motion by an earthquake.
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Old 13th May 2010, 08:52 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VANDOO
WOW! THATS QUITE A COLLECTION OF AXES, I DIDN'T SEE ANY EXAMPLES OF OCEANIC FIGHTING AXES, IS YOUR COLLECTION MOSTLY EUROPEAN?. I did have in past many "ethnic" axes, mostly from Africa, India and the far-east. By choice I limit myself today to North America, Europe and the minor Middle-East. I HAVE NOT SEEN ANY AXES LIKE THE ONES IN YOUR SECOND PICTURE (ONES WITH HORSES, FOX, BIRDS AND A BEAR) WHAT WERE THEY USED FOR AND WHERE ARE THEY FROM? Oooh, these are domestic cleavers, a form of folk art that had appeared first in France, probably during the late 18th century and spreaded both to America and towards Russia.
I USE A SIMULAR SYSTEM FOR MOUNTING WEAPONS IT CAN SUPPORT A LOT OF WEIGHT AND PLASTIC TIE WRAPS CAN BE EASILY REMOVED TO REARRANGE THE DISPLAY OR REMOVE AN ITEM FOR STUDY. I agree. It also saves some holes in the wall. CONGRADULATIONS ON A GREAT COLLECTION.
Thanks!
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Old 13th May 2010, 09:28 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fearn
Wow! I can only imagine that display set in motion by an earthquake.


We have a saying about that (roughly translated):"Don't speak of the devil"
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