Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > European Armoury
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12th October 2009, 07:01 PM   #31
celtan
Member
 
celtan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: PR, USA
Posts: 679
Default

Guys,

Just found out that China and Russia have problems allowing sword imports.

Best

M



Quote:
Originally Posted by fernando
For European buyers,
Also important is to ascertain the place where the item is coming from.
It may happen that you are buying the piece from an European seller, setlle the respective payment with his European account, and then be told that the item is located outside Europe, whith its unexpected repercussion.
Instead of having your item coming through without any Customs harassment,
you end up having it inspected ... and seized; even though it may be an innocent harmless ethnographic piece ... which is something they expect you to prove ... with your sweat ... besides the heavy taxation.
I am narrating my experience.
Fernando
celtan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1st November 2009, 12:23 AM   #32
celtan
Member
 
celtan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: PR, USA
Posts: 679
Default

Just found this exclussion list on EBay. I wonder what's the problem with France, Gibraltar, Guernsey and Monaco?



Shipping to: Worldwide
Excludes: Africa, Central America and Caribbean, Brunei Darussalam, Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Macau, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam, Russian Federation, Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan Republic, Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, Georgia, India, Kazakhstan, Korea, North, Korea, South, Kyrgyzstan, Maldives, Mongolia, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Albania, Belarus, Cyprus, Germany, Gibraltar, Greece, Guernsey, Italy, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, San Marino, Svalbard and Jan Mayen, Ukraine



Quote:
Originally Posted by celtan
Guys,

Just found out that China and Russia have problems allowing sword imports.

Best

M
celtan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1st November 2009, 03:57 PM   #33
Jens Nordlunde
Member
 
Jens Nordlunde's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Europe
Posts: 2,239
Default

Hi Celtan,

I have no doubt that your list is correct, but it surprises me, as in some of the mentioned countries modern weapons seems, almost to be floating around, so why forbid import of antic weapons?

Jens
Jens Nordlunde is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2nd November 2009, 02:20 AM   #34
kahnjar1
Member
 
kahnjar1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: CHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAND (RISING FROM THE RUBBLE)
Posts: 2,143
Default

I can't help wondering who created this list. Seems to me most, though not all, of the countries mentioned perhaps are not "friends" of the US in the political sense??
kahnjar1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd November 2009, 01:15 AM   #35
celtan
Member
 
celtan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: PR, USA
Posts: 679
Default

Hi Stu,

Probably not, but then, does any nation have true friends, even in the political sense?

Heck, sometimes even the members of _our own families_ are anything but friendly. And that's way simpler than in a a macro-social world scale.

I recall a saying long ago +/- stating that "there is no such thing as friendly nations, only nations with similar interests".

: )

Now, taking things a little less seriously, I believe that the mutual factor in the list might be far more mundane, probably poorly regulated mail systems, or Custom Laws that may confiscate "weapons" imported into that country. Whatever it might be, it would be good to know.

I'm amazed that Spain, Israel, Denmark, Switzerland, Turkey and Portugal are not included.

Take care!

M

Quote:
Originally Posted by kahnjar1
I can't help wondering who created this list. Seems to me most, though not all, of the countries mentioned perhaps are not "friends" of the US in the political sense??
celtan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd November 2009, 12:34 PM   #36
bluelake
Member
 
bluelake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Gyeongsan, South Korea
Posts: 57
Default

South Korea (mentioned in the list) is a hard one to bring edged weapons into. It's not impossible, but you need special permits to do so legally. As shown in this newspaper article, the authorities in Korea are starting to get a little picky: http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/new.../117_48769.html

I had an experience with Korean customs several years ago that I now laugh about. I was bringing some antique arrows back to Korea for an archery museum here. When I picked up my luggage, I was stopped by customs and asked to open up the tube I had them in, which I did. Inside were many arrows, including a half-dozen antique (about 200 years old) bamboo arrows with razor sharp broadheads from India. The customs official touched the point with his finger and said, "This is a dangerous weapon; you can't have it." I assured him I could, and he argued the point with me. I even assured him I had Korean fletcher friends who could make even sharper ones for me; he said I was wrong. I further informed him that I've even had similar antique arrows mailed to me and they passed Korean customs. Nothing would convince this guy.

After a time, I asked him to please bring his manual with all the rules about what is and is not allowed. He said, "It's all in Korean," to which I replied, "That's o.k., I can read Korean." He was quite surprised, but brought the manual. Quickly, I found the pertinent section, which stated that traditional and Olympic archery equipment was exempt from the weapons restrictions.

He slammed the book shut, took it over to where a group of customs officials were and, a few minutes later, a different, young official came over and asked me what my job was. I informed him I taught in a Korean university. He then announced to me, "You are a professor. You are not dangerous. You may go."
bluelake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd November 2009, 04:01 PM   #37
broadaxe
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 304
Default

Importing to Israel: short blades are usualy of no problem - excluding automatic knives which are forbidden (you can, however, own an automatic knife and keep it at home). Up to most recent days importing swords was quite easy. Anyone who is a registered society (Ethnic & Historic Egde Weapons Collectors in Israel) member could import any "cold" weapon. As we were informed, an old regulation has been revived, saying any sword needs a special import permit per case/person, from the ministry of trade & industry. Pure beurocracy, + the fact we must pay VAT according to the items value, minding it's an antique of over 100 years old. New knives are subjected to cutlery value customs, which are naturally higher.
Intersting enough, being an axe collector, I imported over 100 axes in past. Any axe fell under "used tools" criteria, not weapon...
broadaxe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd November 2009, 04:36 PM   #38
Sajen
Member
 
Sajen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Germany, Dortmund
Posts: 5,941
Default

Since I have seen that there is no report from a german member here it is:
Until now I never have had a problem when I received a ethnograhic weapon from a non EU country, all what I get I have to pick up by german customs in my city and I have to open the parcel that they can look what I get, not one time I have had a problem by this! Only one time I get something from Philippines what goes over France. France customs send the parcel back to the Philippines.

sajen
Sajen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd November 2009, 04:39 PM   #39
celtan
Member
 
celtan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: PR, USA
Posts: 679
Thumbs up

I can just imagine the guys face when you told him he was wrong over and over again, then actually read to him the pertinent section.



This type of minor officials swell up like puffer fish, and rule within their little niches by cowing the "supplicants" with their uniforms...

Poetic!

So, professors aren't dangerous..? I have always believed that knowledge is the most powerful weapon of all.



Best

M

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluelake
South Korea (mentioned in the list) is a hard one to bring edged weapons into. It's not impossible, but you need special permits to do so legally. As shown in this newspaper article, the authorities in Korea are starting to get a little picky: http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/new.../117_48769.html

I had an experience with Korean customs several years ago that I now laugh about. I was bringing some antique arrows back to Korea for an archery museum here. When I picked up my luggage, I was stopped by customs and asked to open up the tube I had them in, which I did. Inside were many arrows, including a half-dozen antique (about 200 years old) bamboo arrows with razor sharp broadheads from India. The customs official touched the point with his finger and said, "This is a dangerous weapon; you can't have it." I assured him I could, and he argued the point with me. I even assured him I had Korean fletcher friends who could make even sharper ones for me; he said I was wrong. I further informed him that I've even had similar antique arrows mailed to me and they passed Korean customs. Nothing would convince this guy.

After a time, I asked him to please bring his manual with all the rules about what is and is not allowed. He said, "It's all in Korean," to which I replied, "That's o.k., I can read Korean." He was quite surprised, but brought the manual. Quickly, I found the pertinent section, which stated that traditional and Olympic archery equipment was exempt from the weapons restrictions.

He slammed the book shut, took it over to where a group of customs officials were and, a few minutes later, a different, young official came over and asked me what my job was. I informed him I taught in a Korean university. He then announced to me, "You are a professor. You are not dangerous. You may go."
celtan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd November 2009, 10:28 PM   #40
bluelake
Member
 
bluelake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Gyeongsan, South Korea
Posts: 57
Default

Korean customs (and immigration) people are notoriously uninformed. Rules change from office to office and people within the office. I was polite to the officer (these are guys who can order "special" searches), but firm. His eyes went wide when I requested to see the manual (and informed him I could read Korean).

As for dangerous, the young customs guy never saw me with my bow and arrow or matchlock (I'm dangerous to all but my intended target)


Quote:
Originally Posted by celtan
I can just imagine the guys face when you told him he was wrong over and over again, then actually read to him the pertinent section.



This type of minor officials swell up like puffer fish, and rule within their little niches by cowing the "supplicants" with their uniforms...

Poetic!

So, professors aren't dangerous..? I have always believed that knowledge is the most powerful weapon of all.



Best

M
bluelake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th November 2009, 01:01 AM   #41
celtan
Member
 
celtan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: PR, USA
Posts: 679
Default

Yep, the velvet glove over the gauntlet. Everything is better if you can avoid an issue becoming a pissing contest...

From your description, our local government officials may be Korean spies from Customs and Inmigration. : )

Incidentally, I have had to explain federal mail regulations to USPS employees many times. Often, their computer programs lag behind the current regulations. Their faces are always a sight to behold when I point them to the specific items in their secret lore...

BTW, speaking of danger and muzzleloaders. Early this year at a reenactment, I lent my loaded musket to one of our fusiliers, since his was acting up. I loudly warned him that it was loaded, and went back to lead our men.

Apparently he was half deaf from the sound of the firing and did not understood me. He loaded a second charge, but left the frizzen half open and the igniter load spilled. Since he though there was only one charge in the barrel, he intentionally loaded a second charge so as not to waste the BP after priming the pan again. (We use two loads for demonstrations when we have few reenactors). So, in fact he had loaded three charges (375 mgs of FF BP..!) .

When he fired he was right beside me.

Suffice it to say we all stopped firing for a few seconds, just looking at each other.



Best

M


Quote:
Originally Posted by bluelake
Korean customs (and immigration) people are notoriously uninformed. Rules change from office to office and people within the office. I was polite to the officer (these are guys who can order "special" searches), but firm. His eyes went wide when I requested to see the manual (and informed him I could read Korean).

As for dangerous, the young customs guy never saw me with my bow and arrow or matchlock (I'm dangerous to all but my intended target)
celtan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th November 2009, 02:17 AM   #42
bluelake
Member
 
bluelake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Gyeongsan, South Korea
Posts: 57
Default

Youch!

The only thing I can say is, be glad he didn't mix up his can of FFg and FFFFg (Ahem, notice the voice of "experience" in that statement? ). It really gets your attention

Quote:
Originally Posted by celtan
BTW, speaking of danger and muzzleloaders. Early this year at a reenactment, I lent my loaded musket to one of our fusiliers, since his was acting up. I loudly warned him that it was loaded, and went back to lead our men.

Apparently he was half deaf from the sound of the firing and did not understood me. He loaded a second charge, but left the frizzen half open and the igniter load spilled. Since he though there was only one charge in the barrel, he intentionally loaded a second charge so as not to waste the BP after priming the pan again. (We use two loads for demonstrations when we have few reenactors). So, in fact he had loaded three charges (375 mgs of FF BP..!) .

When he fired he was right beside me.

Suffice it to say we all stopped firing for a few seconds, just looking at each other.



Best

M
bluelake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th November 2009, 07:28 AM   #43
Greybeard
Member
 
Greybeard's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 124
Default

I do quite frequently import old/antique kerises from Indonesia to Switzerland. So far, I never had any problem with it. By the way, I am a collector, not a dealer.

Regards,

Heinz
Greybeard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th November 2009, 11:09 AM   #44
celtan
Member
 
celtan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: PR, USA
Posts: 679
Default

Yep, youch...!

The sideways flash, even with the side-shield, almost seared my cheek, and I was three feet away....



Hmmm....Imagine a three pounder firing a Napoleonic 8 oz load of 4F.



Now, you are giving me dangerous ideas.

See? Knowledge is power...even if to blow ourselves up!

Best


M

Beware of things that go booom! in the night



Quote:
Originally Posted by bluelake
Youch!

The only thing I can say is, be glad he didn't mix up his can of FFg and FFFFg (Ahem, notice the voice of "experience" in that statement? ). It really gets your attention
celtan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th November 2009, 11:10 AM   #45
Bryan.H
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Australia
Posts: 51
Default

I don't understand all those excluded countries on that post either, but I have set limits in the past selling the odd item on Auction sites, as I only sell within Australia. If someone from another country shows genuine interest, and they sound trustworthy, I'd run a listing excluding everywhere but that country, and arrange a time via email for that person to purchase the item. As a seller, you want to be paid for your swords, not mucked around and in this day and age, there are many dreamers, scammers and those who just don't pay. I'm suprised this particular exclusion dismisses the entire african continent! I've sold items to S.A. no problems.
Bryan.H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th November 2009, 11:15 AM   #46
celtan
Member
 
celtan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: PR, USA
Posts: 679
Default

Hi Heinz, I'm a collector too, although I have started to unload some of my items. Too much stuff to care for.

I'm told that Switzerland is particularly problematic regarding the import of swords. Have you ever imported one?

Any first hand remarks or advice? I have had to refuse some offers from your corner of the world in the past, thus my interest.

Best

M


Quote:
Originally Posted by Greybeard
I do quite frequently import old/antique kerises from Indonesia to Switzerland. So far, I never had any problem with it. By the way, I am a collector, not a dealer.

Regards,

Heinz
celtan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th November 2009, 11:47 AM   #47
Greybeard
Member
 
Greybeard's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 124
Default

Hello Celtan,

I never imported anything bigger than a large keris (blade length ca. 40 cm). Maybe some might consider this as a sword ... Anyway, it went through directly to my address without any difficulty. Maybe I`ve just been lucky so far.

I regret not to be able to give you a special advice. All I normally do is to order a piece, pay for it and then receive it ... Of course, there are the usual taxes and fees.

I`m awaiting a parcel, containing a nice antique keris from Singapore right now. Just hope it`ll work as well as it usually does ...

Best regards,

Heinz
Greybeard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th November 2009, 10:24 AM   #48
celtan
Member
 
celtan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: PR, USA
Posts: 679
Default

Hi Broadaxe,

But, can you legally import antique swords to israel, after paying VAT etc...?

Germany and England had a similar mechanism in place, and it works reasonably well. That is, besides the aggravation of paying more to the govt.

How does Israel's mail compare to the US or British regarding shipments safety and predictability? Is it like Spain or Italy, where things often simply dissappear into thin air and nobody knows anything?

Best

Manuel




Quote:
Originally Posted by broadaxe
Importing to Israel: short blades are usualy of no problem - excluding automatic knives which are forbidden (you can, however, own an automatic knife and keep it at home). Up to most recent days importing swords was quite easy. Anyone who is a registered society (Ethnic & Historic Egde Weapons Collectors in Israel) member could import any "cold" weapon. As we were informed, an old regulation has been revived, saying any sword needs a special import permit per case/person, from the ministry of trade & industry. Pure beurocracy, + the fact we must pay VAT according to the items value, minding it's an antique of over 100 years old. New knives are subjected to cutlery value customs, which are naturally higher.
Intersting enough, being an axe collector, I imported over 100 axes in past. Any axe fell under "used tools" criteria, not weapon...
celtan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th November 2009, 10:28 AM   #49
celtan
Member
 
celtan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: PR, USA
Posts: 679
Default

Hear, hear !

That's exactly my worry. Also, I don't want any of my "babies" to fall into uncaring hands.

I'm following your advice, and also have included SA within my allowed countries list.

Best

M

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bryan.H
I don't understand all those excluded countries on that post either, but I have set limits in the past selling the odd item on Auction sites, as I only sell within Australia. If someone from another country shows genuine interest, and they sound trustworthy, I'd run a listing excluding everywhere but that country, and arrange a time via email for that person to purchase the item. As a seller, you want to be paid for your swords, not mucked around and in this day and age, there are many dreamers, scammers and those who just don't pay. I'm suprised this particular exclusion dismisses the entire african continent! I've sold items to S.A. no problems.
celtan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th November 2009, 04:02 PM   #50
Jens Nordlunde
Member
 
Jens Nordlunde's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Europe
Posts: 2,239
Default

Hello Heinz,

The trick is to avoid Germany, at any cost. I have had swords sent from England by FedEx; they fly to Paris, and from Paris to Basel, and I have never had any problems. So what you have to do, is to check the transport routes very carefully.

Jens

PS. I am not sure, but I think that most post routes from the US and the northern part of Europe goes over Germany - and land there!
Jens Nordlunde is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th November 2009, 05:53 PM   #51
broadaxe
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 304
Default

Celtan, yes, I can import lagally antique swords into Israel. It may take a little beaurocracy but our society members do so on a regular basis. Some of us are recognized by the customs officials...
The Israeli postal system is not perfect but quite ok. Within all the hundreds of overseas transaction I lost only one parcel that was sent to me, and two items I sent (to Italy, by registerted mail ). When I send primium items abroad I always use our postal currier service (EMS) which never failed me.
broadaxe is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT. The time now is 01:29 PM.


Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.