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Old 8th January 2014, 06:11 PM   #1
Matchlock
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Default Wheellock Mechanism Parts and Their Correct Labeling

I found this on wikipedia and posted it here before.


Let me please do so once again in a thread of its own; its worth it, I guess, especially as some members still seem to have difficulties choosing exact denominations.

The only sad thing about this is that the first image showing the outside of the lock mechanism is of course shown mirrored. I could not reverse it because of the script. Please do keep that in mind.

The lock mechanism is German, the locksmith was Georg Schneider in Nuremberg, ca. 1575-80.


Enjoy, and best,
Michael
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Last edited by Matchlock : 8th January 2014 at 06:23 PM.
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Old 8th January 2014, 08:17 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matchlock
... The only sad thing about this is that the first image showing the outside of the lock mechanism is of course shown mirrored. I could not reverse it because of the script. Please do keep that in mind....

What you mean mirrored, Michl ?

.
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Last edited by fernando : 8th January 2014 at 08:44 PM.
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Old 8th January 2014, 08:59 PM   #3
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O.k. then, you scoundrel,

When you're here with me in Bavaria you gotta show me how you did that, you computer crack!

Best, and thanks a million,
Michl, a bloody computer layman
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Old 12th January 2014, 11:28 AM   #4
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A finely etched, detached wheellock mechanism for a small arquebus, Ausgburg, Bavaria, ca. 1565-70, formerly in the author's collection; author's photographs.

This is one of the very rare instances that you can study a wheellock mechanism when completely dismantled down to all its tiniest parts, and the smallest of screws.


Best,
Michael
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Last edited by Matchlock : 12th January 2014 at 05:57 PM.
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Old 12th January 2014, 11:35 AM   #5
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A finely etched and gilt double lock and barrel wheellock pistol, made by Peter Peck in Munich, Bavaria, in ca. 1540-45, preserved in the Met and dismantled to all its single parts.

Have fun jigsaw-puzzling!


m
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Old 12th January 2014, 12:08 PM   #6
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What ... do you expect me to insert a legend in each part ?
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Old 12th January 2014, 12:30 PM   #7
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Well, 'Nando,


If anybody can manage to do that, then he must be a computer cracker like you!


Best,
Michl
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Old 12th January 2014, 12:47 PM   #8
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Don't keep telling those things or people out there beleives that ... and will conclude i flag such presumption. I am a complete ignaro; whom keeps hammering on the most basic keys till he gets some lousy (est) result
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Old 12th January 2014, 01:17 PM   #9
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Hello Matchlock

Indeed, it is a blessing to see gutted mechanisms. Here in Argentina we have no weapons wheel, maybe two and a museum least see them gutted. At most we spark Arms (There is only one copy of wick) (matchlock). Thank you very much.

Affectionately. Fernando K
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Old 12th January 2014, 01:29 PM   #10
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Thank you so much, Fernando,

I guess I perfectly understood that the translating machine you employed meant dismantled by 'gutted' and flintlocks by 'spark' arms.

Best/affectionately,
Michael
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Old 12th January 2014, 02:09 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matchlock
... I guess I perfectly understood that the translating machine you employed meant dismantled by 'gutted' ...

Not a wrong analogy, though
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Old 12th January 2014, 05:48 PM   #12
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That's exactly what I thought, 'Nando,


When looking up the meaning of the verb to gut, which was unknown to me.


Best,
Michl
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Old 13th January 2014, 07:22 AM   #13
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I think i did it
But some correction is probably needed


Last edited by Marcus den toom : 13th January 2014 at 09:36 AM.
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Old 13th January 2014, 09:13 AM   #14
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Hi Marcus,


Gosh, you actually did it!
Thank you so much. It was quite a joke between 'Nando and me, I would not have expected anybody to achieve this aim.


I have only very few suggestions to make as long as you can still edit and alter your post in the course of today:



3: wheel cover plate screws

9: dog with upper and lower jaw and tightening screw (it is not a hammer as it does not strike)

10: combined pan and wheel cover plate

15: dog retaining screw



5: combined wheel shaft, excentric and chain

7: pan cover

8: pan cover plate

14: dog with upper and lower jaw and tightening screw

18: dog retaining screw

19: safety catch spring

20: swiveling safety catch

21: saftey catch screw

28: combined left sear and right trigger release spring

31: left main spring pin

37: combined right sear and trigger release spring


Anyone with other sugggestions?


Best,
Michael
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Old 13th January 2014, 09:48 AM   #15
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Now, that's a cracker alright .
Thanks a lot Marcus .
Saved in my libraries..
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Old 13th January 2014, 10:51 AM   #16
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Hi,

Thank you both for your compliments
Fernando, did you save the altered version (i corrected a few names after Michael's input )
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Old 13th January 2014, 04:44 PM   #17
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I know its getting down to silly detail but their doesn't seem to be a general agreement about a descriptor for item 30/38. Proposed 'trigger release '
Other variations include 'trigger lever' or 'secondary sear'. I sometimes refer to it as a 'prop' because that describes what it effective does. That is props up the tail of the primary sear locking the primary sear into the wheel. I think my preferred descriptor would be 'secondary sear' in order to avoid confusion with some earlier locks that use a single sear .
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Old 13th January 2014, 04:48 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcus den toom
...Fernando, did you save the altered version (i corrected a few names after Michael's input )

Yes ... i checked it before; thanks for caring
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Old 24th May 2014, 12:54 PM   #19
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All photos in this thread are copyrighted by either the author of the thread, Matchlock, or the authors of the respective posts, except mentioned otherwise.
They may not be used except by written permission from the author.
All rights reserved.
Infringements will be pursued legally.

Michael

Last edited by Matchlock : 24th May 2014 at 06:29 PM.
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