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Old 10th June 2019, 02:46 PM   #1
Via Dixiane
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Default Waterloo or not...

Hi everyone,
I bought a few years ago that "" battle field" memorabilia.
One big piece of hollow Canon ball mounted on 3 small ones.
Weight 2 kilos
Diameter of big one at least 100 mm
Small ones 40 mm
There is a solide brass plate on it... That's the beginning of the mystery... I can't read it... It seems to be handwritten Cyrillic...
It seems to have been important to made such efforts. The plate is very good quality and as old as the Canon ball. It's the reason why I wonder it would not come from Waterloo batte field. Some Russian troops took part in it..
Thanks sharing knowledge!
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Old 11th June 2019, 09:33 AM   #2
fernando
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Nice setup.
... with what appears to be four grapeshot or canister ammo balls; diameter and probable weight (250 grams) too small for one pound solid shot. The grenade fragment, if measured 13 cms. in diameter, would be for a 5 1/2" howitzer ... or similar equipment.
I confess i would never guess the inscription on the plate is Cyrillic !

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Old 11th June 2019, 10:34 AM   #3
Via Dixiane
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about the cyrillic... i'm not so sure... But i can not read it in french
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Old 12th June 2019, 02:29 AM   #4
batjka
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The inscription translates as "Memory of Sevastopol". Possibly a fragment of a shell shot during the Crimean War (1853 - 1856).

Last edited by batjka : 12th June 2019 at 02:41 AM.
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Old 12th June 2019, 06:07 AM   #5
Via Dixiane
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thanks a lot Batjka !
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Old 12th June 2019, 10:10 AM   #6
fernando
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So .. it was Cyrillic, after all .
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Old 13th June 2019, 05:57 PM   #7
Will M
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These are great pieces of history. No reason to doubt authenticity as tons of it is still in the ground. Seems they are digging up stuff for decades and more.
I have 93rd Highlander buttons from a seller in Russia, most likely from old graves dug up as you don't find lost buttons by the dozens. Seems wrong to me but well after 100+ years out of living memory graves tend to be more archeological and less sacred. I have no idea if British Crimea graves were well marked or not or a variation of unmarked and marked.
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Old 13th June 2019, 07:16 PM   #8
Jim McDougall
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Will M
These are great pieces of history. No reason to doubt authenticity as tons of it is still in the ground. Seems they are digging up stuff for decades and more.
I have 93rd Highlander buttons from a seller in Russia, most likely from old graves dug up as you don't find lost buttons by the dozens. Seems wrong to me but well after 100+ years out of living memory graves tend to be more archeological and less sacred. I have no idea if British Crimea graves were well marked or not or a variation of unmarked and marked.




As far as I know Will, there is a memorial marker to the British soldiers who fell during the 'Charge' in the location there (mostly vineyards now). It seems most graves, as often in battle aftermath situations, were largely unmarked, or whatever temporary markers now long gone.

Places of battle still give up relics and material from those events, and for example, in Nashville and surrounding areas there are constantly items found from the Civil War.

As young boys, my brother and I living in Utah at what was once a WWII air force training base (the war had only been over less than 10 years), we were walking through a field a in the tall grass found a (thankfully inert) 500 lb. training bomb. It was mostly empty, but we carried in home, to the dismay and horror of neighborhood folks as they looked out their windows! It is not hard to imagine the reaction of our parents.
After time, dad put in in the attic. Then we moved.....unloading our stuff states away, my brother and I wondered where the bomb was....dad apparently uh, forgot it in the attic...
I often wondered the reaction of the houses' new owners!
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