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Old 28th May 2020, 02:32 AM   #1
tanaruz
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Default TBOLI KAMPILAN

Hello friends,

My new warrior friend? an old t'boli kampilan. unfortunately, no scabbard (but can be made here).

Not so sure, but I've seen a picture of a blaan datu having the same 'blade profile' blade. Is there a possibility that this could also be b'laan?

thanks and keep safe.

Yves
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Old 28th May 2020, 02:50 AM   #2
Battara
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It is possible that this is a Bila'an trade blade, but I doubt it. T'boli had this blade profile too.

I would say that this is T'boli all the way through, and without question the hilt.

Nice example.

Have you etched the blade yet just in case it might have laminations?
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Old 28th May 2020, 03:07 AM   #3
tanaruz
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Default tboli kampilan

Quote:
Originally Posted by Battara
It is possible that this is a Bila'an trade blade, but I doubt it. T'boli had this blade profile too.

I would say that this is T'boli all the way through, and without question the hilt.

Nice example.

Have you etched the blade yet just in case it might have laminations?


Hello Sir. Haven't etched it yet. Once etched, will post pics.

All the best,

Yves
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Old 28th May 2020, 04:07 AM   #4
Marbel
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Default Tboli

Hello Yves,
Thanks for posting the photos. Iím always happy to see these pieces.

It appears as if the guard is sort of flush with the top of the blade. Does it show signs of being ground down, or just cast that way?

Itís also interesting to see what looks like the blade being Ďrivetedí into the hilt (I can see a small circle that sort of looks like a rivet). Is that correct?

Are you able to post photos of the top and underside of the hilt? Iím wondering if there are patterns there.

Thanks again,
Craig
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Old 28th May 2020, 05:00 AM   #5
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That might be a casting flaw, but if not, I would wonder if the hilt might have been later.

In any case, close ups and better pics would help.
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Old 29th May 2020, 12:27 AM   #6
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Hello Yves,

I agree with Jose and Craig that, so far, this looks 100% T'boli-made blade and hilt. As you likely know, the cast hilts are constructed from wax models carved by women. A mold is then made around the wax model and molten brass is poured into the mold--the wax melts and a finely detailed casting is obtained. This "lost wax" (Fr. cire perdue) method has been employed by various groups for 6,000 years.

Ian.

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Old 29th May 2020, 09:17 AM   #7
tanaruz
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Default tboli kampilan

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marbel
Hello Yves,
Thanks for posting the photos. Iím always happy to see these pieces.

It appears as if the guard is sort of flush with the top of the blade. Does it show signs of being ground down, or just cast that way?

Itís also interesting to see what looks like the blade being Ďrivetedí into the hilt (I can see a small circle that sort of looks like a rivet). Is that correct?

Are you able to post photos of the top and underside of the hilt? Iím wondering if there are patterns there.

Thanks again,
Craig


Hi Craig,

Additional pics of the blade. 1) guard: the top part of the guard was broken in a skirmish during ww2. 2) hilt/riveted: there are 2 metal 'rivets' that holds the old hilt to the blade. Made during ww2 when it was 'used,'- these comments came from the son of a ww2 veteran who used this piece during ww2.
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Last edited by tanaruz : 29th May 2020 at 09:18 AM. Reason: additional picture
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Old 29th May 2020, 02:21 PM   #8
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Default Tboli

Thank you for the additional photos and background. He's a nice old piece, well-used and well-loved.

I'm always curious about the journeys of these Tboli swords. Can you please mention where your friend believes his father was during WWII? Are they Tboli?

While their territory sometimes appeared on maps and locals knew of their existence, the Tboli people remained quite remote and relatively unknown until well into the late 1950's-early 1960's. Amongst the other groups in the area - including the coastal Moros - trade was common, as well as war and intermarriage. Being able to pinpoint the location of a piece like this during WWII (or before) would be interesting.

Thank you.
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Old 29th May 2020, 08:20 PM   #9
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Well that history explains a lot about the broken guard and rivets.
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Old 31st May 2020, 08:00 AM   #10
tanaruz
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Default TBOLI KAMPILAN

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marbel
Thank you for the additional photos and background. He's a nice old piece, well-used and well-loved.

I'm always curious about the journeys of these Tboli swords. Can you please mention where your friend believes his father was during WWII? Are they Tboli?

While their territory sometimes appeared on maps and locals knew of their existence, the Tboli people remained quite remote and relatively unknown until well into the late 1950's-early 1960's. Amongst the other groups in the area - including the coastal Moros - trade was common, as well as war and intermarriage. Being able to pinpoint the location of a piece like this during WWII (or before) would be interesting.

Thank you.


Hi Craig,

Was able to get more info regarding this blade. The latest previous owner (from which I bought the kampilan) was the 4th person to have owned the piece. Lets identify him as # 4. Was able to call and talk to the seller who sold him the blade (#3) and I was informed that the blade came from his father (#2) who was a soldier fighting the Japanese in WW2. The It was a heirloom piece that came from his (#2) father (#1) who was once a Datu of the T'boli tribe in South Cotabato.

The blade, however, was originally owned by a more older person than #1, also a Datu and the father of #1.

The blade originally came from the T'boli tribe (Lake Sebu area).
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Old 31st May 2020, 11:56 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tanaruz
Hi Craig,

Was able to get more info regarding this blade. The latest previous owner (from which I bought the kampilan) was the 4th person to have owned the piece. Lets identify him as # 4. Was able to call and talk to the seller who sold him the blade (#3) and I was informed that the blade came from his father (#2) who was a soldier fighting the Japanese in WW2. The It was a heirloom piece that came from his (#2) father (#1) who was once a Datu of the T'boli tribe in South Cotabato.

The blade, however, was originally owned by a more older person than #1, also a Datu and the father of #1.

The blade originally came from the T'boli tribe (Lake Sebu area).
Excellent provenance! Seldom does one know these details. As the fifth or sixth owner of this piece, you have its entire history. It would seem that the sword was likely made in the late 19th C or early part of the 20th C. Given its heirloom status, one wonders why #3 would sell it. I know people need money, but it seems this was an important family heirloom and had been preserved in the family for four generations. At least it wasn't put up on eBay!
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